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Converting a 2-10-0 to a 0-10-0.

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Converting a 2-10-0 to a 0-10-0.
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 19, 2004 3:55 PM
Hey all;

Besides being interested in the B&O, I also really like the Pennsylvania.

I was considering the idea of converting a PRR I1 2-10-0, into an 0-10-0. By at the minimum shortening the pilot deck, removing the air tanks; the lead truck of course; and the feed water heater on the side. What do you all think of this conversion?

One concern I have is that it may look rather cartoon like as the I1 is not a small loco by any stretch of the imagination.

Alvie.
  • Member since
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  • From: Elgin, IL
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Posted by orsonroy on Thursday, August 19, 2004 4:03 PM
If you're talking about freelancing an 0-10-0, go for it. Many roads, especially east of the Mississippi, had a few gigantic 0-10-0s used for transfer and hump yard service. The Belpare boiler might look a bit odd, unless the rest of your freelance roster has them too.

If you do decide to go with this conversion, I'd suggest a completely new cab and tender as well, to get away from that Pennsy look. And if you're using the Bowser kit as the basis of the kitbash, remotor it with (at least) one of the Alliance Helix Humper can motors; it'll make a world of difference in slow speed control.

Ray Breyer

Modeling the NKP's Peoria Division, circa 1943

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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 19, 2004 6:06 PM
Hi Ray;

Thanks for the input, but I'm sorry that I forgot to mention that I want the model to retain all the Pennsy flavor.

Whether the Pennsy had 0-10-0s or not, I'm not sure, but I thought it'd be interesting to do one.

I haven't picked a base model yet. I've been thinking that an old Sunset or PFM brass model would be a good starting point.

Thanks again,
Alvie.
  • Member since
    June 2004
  • From: Pacific Northwest
  • 3,864 posts
Posted by Don Gibson on Thursday, August 19, 2004 10:53 PM
Removing the pilot trucks is easy. changing to a 'Switcher type pilot will require some work. Try Cal Scale first.
Don Gibson .............. ________ _______ I I__()____||__| ||||| I / I ((|__|----------| | |||||||||| I ______ I // o--O O O O-----o o OO-------OO ###########################
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  • From: Milwaukee WI (Fox Point)
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Posted by dknelson on Monday, August 23, 2004 8:32 AM
The B&O converted some 2-8-0s to 0-8-0s. But what they did about rebalancing the engine (since the pilot wheel does carry some locomotive weight) I do not know. Presumably some rebalancing issues would exist if the prototype had converted a 2-10-0 to an 0-10-0.
An 0-10-0 would be a big switcher. The "Union" type was an 0-10-2 -- a trailing truck to support the big firebox.
Me, I am enough of a Pennsy fan to keep the engine as it is. The Pennsy had a few huge 0-8-0, and it might be interesting to compare the boiler size with the I1 class.
Dave Nelson
Dave Nelson
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 23, 2004 11:47 AM
As the I1was a road engine, it has 62" drivers. It could reach 50 mph. The C&O 0-10-0, a hump and transfer engine, had 51" drivers. I think the Union had 57" drivers, but I'm not sure on that. An 0-10-0 with 62" drivers may not look right. The B&O 2-8-0s were light enough to downgrade to switching service without the leading truck, though they also had 62" drivers, I think. B&O converted some 2-10-2s to 0-10-0. A heftier boiler on the Spectrum 2-10-0 minus the lead truck might look better, but what a lot of work.
smyers

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