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Amish buggies

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Amish buggies
Posted by davemiller7 on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 3:37 PM

I'm modeling 1953 Pennsylvania in HO and I'd like to add 1 or 2 Amish buggies to my railroad. Does anyone know of any models or prototype plans so that I might scratchbuild them? Any info would be much appreciated.

Thanx,

-Dave

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Posted by galaxy on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 4:10 PM

Hi

I tried to do an exhaustive google search looking for dimensions of Lancaster County PA Amish buggy styles. Or any Amish buggy design dimensions for that matter. I could find no such information on dimensions, just lots of photos and listings for buggy rides. I found one promising site but every link seemed to dead-end in a "page not found".

I can tell you the standard gray enclosed buggy they use down there is relatively small in size and amazing at times how many people they can cram into one.

Walthers seem to have them listed as unavailable in N and Z scale, but none in  HO.

You could try doing the google search for the buggy rides or buggy sales and calling them to see if they can direct you to a place where you might find the dimensions.

Good luck finding one, or the dimensions to scrap build one.

-G .

Just my thoughts, ideas, opinions and experiences. Others may vary.

 HO and N Scale.

After long and careful thought, they have convinced me. I have come to the conclusion that they are right. The aliens did it.

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Posted by Motley on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 4:15 PM

Hmm... about these Amish buggy's. Wouldn't the buggy's have been exactly the same in 1910 as in 2010?

LOL Think about it. Crazy thought.

Michael

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Posted by Heritagefleet1 on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 4:36 PM

Dave...

wow...what a great post.  Never thought about modeling anything in that period . Just a wild guess, but you may want to contact the Pennsylvania Railroad Museum - they may know of a source for the demensions and drawings. I've been there several times(lived near Gettysburg,PA) and the Model Railraod Shop there had a huge book store on the second floor with all kinds of reserch on that area.

Just an idea but it may help.

Good luck,

HeritageFleet1

 

 

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Posted by Steam4Ever2 on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 4:36 PM

Try using BING as your search engine.  I typed Amish Buggy Plans, and got some hits on plans you can buy.  Hope this helps more than it hurts

 

Kevin

If it looks like a train, and usually stays on the tracks, by golly, its probably a train. Remember that model railroading is fun!
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Posted by howmus on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 4:43 PM

Try a search on Old School Mennonite (Aka Old Order Mennonites and Anabaptists).  Many of the "Amish" we see out there aren't "Amish" they are Old School Mennonite.  The buggies they use are almost identicle (except for the color of the top). 

The Amish are a breakoff group from the Mennonites way back when and are today a different sect.  If you still can't find what you are looking for, then stop in at a Mennonite or Amish store.  Here in the Finger Lakes region of NYS they are very common.  I am sure someone there would be glad to steer you in the right direction to find the information you are seeking.

Good luck!

73

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Posted by maxman on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 4:49 PM

Motley

Hmm... about these Amish buggy's. Wouldn't the buggy's have been exactly the same in 1910 as in 2010?

 

 

Well, we replaced the hitch three times and the canvas cover twice.  Three of the wheels are OEM, but we had to replace the fourth because the oldest kid ran it without air.  And of course, we wore out a couple horses.  But otherwise, yes, it is the same wagon we've had since 1910.

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Posted by maxman on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 5:02 PM

These are 1/12 scale, but they'll give you an idea.  Scroll down about 3/4 of the way:

http://amishshop.com/hazel-doc/woodentoys.htm

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Posted by howmus on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 5:04 PM

maxman

 

 Motley:

 

Hmm... about these Amish buggy's. Wouldn't the buggy's have been exactly the same in 1910 as in 2010?

 

Well, we replaced the hitch three times and the canvas cover twice.  Three of the wheels are OEM, but we had to replace the fourth because the oldest kid ran it without air.  And of course, we wore out a couple horses.  But otherwise, yes, it is the same wagon we've had since 1910.

Oh and don't forget many have changed out to electric lights for night time rather than the old kerosine ones....

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Posted by tomikawaTT on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 5:47 PM

Another idea to think about.

When I visited the Strasburg RR, I noticed that some of the locals were using big-wheeled stand up push scooters, apparently made from circa 1950 fat-tired bicycles.  The platforms were big, and the baskets attached to the handlebars were even bigger.

While they were in common use, no two were exactly alike.  I suspect that they were cobbled up by individuals working with junk yard parts.

So, now, when did they first appear?  Deponent knoweth not.

Chuck (Modeling Central Japan in September, 1964 - bicycles, si; buggies and scooters, no)

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 6:50 PM

How demanding are you on the prototype?  Jordan Miniatures has a buggy that looks like this:

To me, a buggy is a buggy.  They also have wagons and a number of other horse-drawn vehicles.  I can't tell one from the other.  No horse sense, I guess you'd say.

These are kits.  They are small, but after you do one or two, you start to get into the Zen of Jordan kits, and they become easier.  Patience and tweezers will get you there.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by Hamltnblue on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:19 PM

The Hobby shop at Strasburg sells the Amish Buggies and horses. I believe they are made by the amish.

I have one I picked up during a visit last year.

This might be the link but doesn't have a pic.  Just give them a call and I'm sure they'll be happy to help.

http://www.strasburgrailroadstore.com/Vehicles_HO_p/1930.htm

Springfield PA

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Posted by HarryHotspur on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:22 PM

Are you looking for a powered or unpowered version?

- Harry

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Posted by Hamltnblue on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:24 PM

They make powered model horse drawn buggies?

 

Springfield PA

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Posted by HarryHotspur on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:26 PM

Hamltnblue

They make powered model horse drawn buggies?

Sure.  One horsepower is standard.

- Harry

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Posted by HarryHotspur on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:28 PM

Here's a link with lots of photos.  Maybe it will help.

http://www.google.com/images?q=amish+buggy&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&biw=1016&bih=630

- Harry

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Posted by CTValleyRR on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:33 PM

This may sound like a crazy idea, but many Amish folk are amazingly talented with their hands.  I have several beautiful wooden toys of Amish construction.  If you explained what you wanted, you might find someone willing to scratchbuild one for you.

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Posted by Hamltnblue on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:35 PM

As I noted earlier, I beleive the ones at Strasburg RR are made by the amish.  It is right in the middle of Amish farmland.

Springfield PA

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Posted by Hamltnblue on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:43 PM

Here's a pic of the one I picked up there.

Springfield PA

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Posted by CTValleyRR on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:44 PM

MisterBeasley

Jordan Miniatures has a buggy that looks like this:

http://www.discounttrainsonline.com/graphics/360/L108.jpg

Well, this looks nothing like an Amish buggy, but it could probably be kitbashed into one fairly easily.  Get a '50s panel truck and stick the sides and the back on this model, and shorten the wheelbase and roof.

Connecticut Valley Railroad A Branch of the New York, New Haven, and Hartford

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Posted by rockislandnut on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 8:26 PM

Like its Amish counterpart, the Mennonite Courting Buggy is used by young Mennonite men during the "courting" years.

 

Hmmm, my pic looks like your pic, whats not Amish about it??

Wadda ya mean I'm old ? Just because I remember gasoline at 9 cents a gallon and those big coal burning steamers.

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 8:31 PM

Hamltnblue

Here's a pic of the one I picked up there.

http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll17/hamltnblue/Layout/IMG_0009.jpg

That looks I like the ones I see crossing on the overpasses while I am driving on the toll road in northern Indiana.

Rich

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Posted by inch53 on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 8:40 PM

You try Musket Miniature. I bought a couple horse drawn wagons and some other things from them.

 http://www.musketminiatures.com/

 inch

http://www.trainboard.com/railimages/showgallery.php/cat/500/ppuser/4309

DISCLAIMER-- This post does not clam anything posted here as fact or truth, but it may be just plain funny
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Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 8:47 PM

 I KNOW the make them, because we used to have one on our old layout when I was a kid. No idea where it came from. Probably the same ones that are available in Strasburg, although back then there was no train shop.

 You might also want a plain flatbed version, seen carrying stuff between farms on working days. About the only difference you'll find between a 1910 period one and a modern one are the orange triangles and electric lights - yes, they have electric lights, run with a battery.

                           --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

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Posted by gondola1988 on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 10:30 PM

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Posted by G Paine on Thursday, September 30, 2010 11:16 AM

galaxy

I can tell you the standard gray enclosed buggy they use down there is relatively small in size and amazing at times how many people they can cram into one.

When my wife and I visited Lancaster County a few years ago, I noticed that there were 3 colors for the top of the Amish buggys - black, gray and brown. I was told there were 3 groups of Amish with slightly different beliefs and each used their own color for the buggy tops. If you consider the standard buggy as a station wagon, some were driving a pickup truck style. It had a single seat with a low box on the back made from welded chrome checkered plate.

As to lights, the more consertative group still hang an oil lantern on the back  while others have battery powered LED taillights, some even with turn signals. All had the reflective orange triangle on the back like you see on slow moving farm equipment.

One day we were stopped at a traffic light, and an Amish gentleman drove his buggy by us in the turn lane, and made a right turn into the local WalMart.

George In Midcoast Maine, 'bout halfway up the Rockland branch

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Posted by ZYDACO on Thursday, May 29, 2014 6:40 PM
have not see an amish buggy in ho or n scale TO DATE. WITH ONE EXCEPTION there is a toy store about halfway between Strausburg and rt.30 on 896 that has a pewter mosdel with horse in a close N scale.the last 5 years I have requested woodland scenic and preiser to make N scale models of peoples and buggies to no avail. DO MNOT WASTE YOUR TIME ON ETCHED BRASS MODELS.

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