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Glue for Wooden Kits

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Glue for Wooden Kits
Posted by Walnut on Monday, February 22, 2010 4:12 AM

Hi Guys

Can you please advise on which is the best type of glue to use on small wooden building kits 

Thanks

Alan

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Posted by Railphotog on Monday, February 22, 2010 5:28 AM

Ordinary white glue as made by Elmers, or yellow carpenters' glue.

 

 

Bob Boudreau

CANADA

Visit my model railroad photography website: http://sites.google.com/site/railphotog/

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Posted by Walnut on Monday, February 22, 2010 5:53 AM

Thanks for that advice

I thought that might be the case but just wanted to be sure before I started

Alan

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, February 22, 2010 8:34 AM

I use mostly white glue too.  For some parts, particularly very small ones or places where there is only minimal contact between parts, I will sometimes use CA (cyanoacrlyate) glue.

In either case, apply the glue sparingly with a toothpick.  When you have glue oozing out from the seams, it seals the wood and then paint and stain won't take well.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by simon1966 on Monday, February 22, 2010 10:05 AM

My personal preference it Titebond wood trim glue.  It is also a yellow carpenters glue, but it has a bit more tack and I like the control that this provides me.  I also apply sparingly with a toothpick.  This type of glue does not accept stain, so if you are planning to stain the wood and or siding, do that first, because any of this glue on the surface will show quite clearly after the rest is stained.

Simon Modelling CB&Q and Wabash See my slowly evolving layout on my picturetrail site http://www.picturetrail.com/simontrains and our videos at http://www.youtube.com/user/MrCrispybake?feature=mhum

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Posted by dstarr on Monday, February 22, 2010 11:40 AM

 For joints requiring real strength,  say end blocks in a wood passenger car  or corner joints in a building, the "PVA" glues are good as it comes.  These include Elmers, Bordens, the white glues issued to school children, and various brands of yellow carpenters glue.  They dry to a bond as strong as the wood itself, and you cannot ask for more than that.  They all should be clamped while drying to get maximun strength and to prevent parts from slipping out of place.  They need an over night dry for real strength.  Glue spills and sqeeze outs will prevent wood stain from penetrating the wood.  If you are using a stain, I would stain before glueing.  The yellow carpenter's glue is more waterproof than the white glues, but unless you have running water on your layout, you don't care. I generally use a yellow glue, 'cause I have it in the shop, but a white glue is plenty good enough for model work.

For less demanding joints, say trim pieces, the old nitrocellulose cement (Duco cement or Ambroid's cement) are strong enough and they dry strong in minutes.  

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Posted by markpierce on Monday, February 22, 2010 1:22 PM

I've used all the above, but in recent months I've become fond of canopy glue.  It has the color and consistency of white glue, dries clear, sets relatively fast, is strong-holding, and works with dissimilar materials such as plastic to wood and metal to wood.

Mark

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Posted by toot toot on Monday, February 22, 2010 1:53 PM

i have been in the hobby since my older sister gave me her train set when she left for college in 1962.  I was active in the hobby until i moved in 1992, when everything got boxed.  three moves and four jobs later i still have many of the models i built back in the 60s.  i'm sorry to report the train boxes were not handled with the greatest of care.  In 2005, a new house and a new layout.

Several of my ambroid and labelle passenger cars were assembled using ambroid glue.  The glue has become brittle and most of my favorite coaches now reside on the workbench repair shelf.  many houses and bridges done with elmer's white glue have quite a few pieces loose, (most windows and some wall assemblies.)  Some Binkley passenger cars with cardboard sides which i put together with "Goo" came through with no more than the loss of a handrail.  Most models assembled with CA+, well, they have returned to kit state in the intervening years.   

white glue takes a whole lot of clips and clamps and drying time.  I suggest a contact cement, like Goo, for wood models. 

 

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Posted by mokenarr on Monday, February 22, 2010 3:13 PM

 i use a yellow carpenters glue on wood ...  one advantage over white glue is it sands better...  also on titebond there are different set up times , which can allow more time to move thngs around if needed.

Old Steam loco's never die, they just lose thier fire.
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Posted by shayfan84325 on Tuesday, February 23, 2010 12:05 AM

markpierce

I've used all the above, but in recent months I've become fond of canopy glue.  It has the color and consistency of white glue, dries clear, sets relatively fast, is strong-holding, and works with dissimilar materials such as plastic to wood and metal to wood.

Mark

Thanks for this post.

I've seen canopy glue in the Micro Mark catalog, but never tried it.  Your description is very helpful.

Phil,
I'm not a rocket scientist; they are my students.

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Posted by Walnut on Tuesday, February 23, 2010 3:20 AM

 

Many thanks for all your help guys

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Posted by Walnut on Sunday, September 09, 2012 2:47 PM

Thanks again guys

I have purchased an old TK Model mixed wood and white metal kit of a station building, I followed you advice before and used white glue, but what would you use to join white metal and wood together ?

Also what do you use to stain the wood, I used thinned down wood stain, was I right ?

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Posted by dstarr on Sunday, September 09, 2012 3:21 PM

Hmm,  thread revival from some time ago. 

For white metal castings,  you can use nitrocellulose cement or white glue.  Neither will be very strong, but they are strong enough for most cases.  For real strength, use a contact cement like Walther's Goo or Pliobond.   Or epoxy or CA.   In all cases, you should wash the metal parts in soap and water to get the grease off them and then pickle them in a mild acid (I use supermarket vinegar) for an hour or so.  This etches the surface and gives some "tooth" for adhesive and paint  to grab onto. 

  If the wood stain gives the color you like, it's the right stuff.  I use Minwax when I have it.  Thinned down paint works, so does india ink in alcohol. 

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