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any clues on turntable wiring?

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  • Member since
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  • From: K.I.S.S- Keep it simple stupid
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any clues on turntable wiring?
Posted by teen steam fan on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 4:53 PM

I have a Walthers 90' turntable I am installing. I lost the directions and have no clue on how to wire it up. Any ideas.
Thanks

 

If you can read this... thank a teacher. If you are reading this in english... thank a veteran

When in doubt. grab a hammer. 

If it moves and isn't supposed to, get a hammer

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Posted by MikeFF on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 5:44 PM
Try Walthers Customer Service. They have always been great for me and will get you instructons. If it is the inexpensive 90 footer, good luck with that. I've been fighting with mine for a year. Still...you solder a wire to the inside of each of the brass rings and run them up through the slots in the sides of the pivot, through the bridge and solder to each rail, then, glue down the rail. The brass wipers in the kit ride on the installed rings. Get some phosphor bronze and make new wipers, or you will have contact problems forever.

Mike

 

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Posted by teen steam fan on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 7:04 PM

yeah I have no idea what the price was. I got it as a christmas present years ago. (ironic hu) I have the pit installed and am working on the approch tracks. Now I am trying to find a roundhouse that will protect my engines from a little feline that resides in the basement

If you can read this... thank a teacher. If you are reading this in english... thank a veteran

When in doubt. grab a hammer. 

If it moves and isn't supposed to, get a hammer

If it doesn't move and is supposed to, get a hammer

If it's broken, get a hammer

If it can't be fixed with a hammer... DUCK TAPE!

  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Vancouver Island, BC
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Posted by selector on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 7:37 PM

There should be two very thin wires that must be soldered to the rails.  You solder them under the rail feet, and then feed the other ends down through the hollow pivot tube.  The falling ends are to be soldered inside the two brass rings that should be included in the pit.  Then the two rings are slid into position partway up the shaft...the hollow pivot.  Two phosphor bronze or copper wipers are to be mounted on a bracket so that each one wipes one of the brass rings.  Wires wrapped around the screws retaining the wipers get power from the track bus or directly from your DCC system.

Good luck with this kit.  It is a bear to get working well.

-Crandell

  • Member since
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  • From: Upstate NY
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Posted by MikeFF on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 7:56 PM
Some things I did to try to make this kit work better. Cement some strips strips of styrene to the bottom, making sure that you're not interfering with any other parts. This keeps the pit from flexing. which is a major flaw as it seems to change shape by the minute. Make sure that ALL the flash is off the wheels on the ends of the bridge and that they are truly round. Some builders have tried replacing them with N or Z wheels cut from wheel sets. If the bottom of the pivot is not exactly square, it can tilt the whole works as it rotates. If you are using the powering kit, make sure all the flash is off the big gear. Cut a whole in the bottom housing to allow you to clean the contacts. The shame is that this builds up into a good looking turntable. The engineering is just weird. Why put the motor in the bottom housing instead of on the bottom of the pit for easy servicing? What is the real purpose of the big washer and why isn't it made of something slippery like Teflon? Mine will work great one day and be awful the next. Current trick: Is runs smoothly around most of the swing, then hesitates for the rest. Or the bridge drops a scale 3 inches when a locomotive goes on, but not tomorrow.

Mike

 

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Posted by Allegheny2-6-6-6 on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 11:28 PM

 Trust me when I tell you this!

Stop your frustration and if you insist on keeping it and not throwing it in the trash where it belongs use it as a manual turntable and simply us logn enough wires to make a singe 359 degree spin. That means don't go all the way around multiple times make one almost complete revolution and then go back the other way.  You ever hear of the old expression you can't make a silk pure out of a sows ear well that applies to that kit turntable. It's complete and utter junk. I found this out after giving up after getting 4 driver gears from Walthers and having them all brake. the method with the two wipers contacting the brass pieces on the shaft is total bush league engineering. I know the built up one is a lot of money but at he $45 or so dollar they get for the kit your a couple of hundred shy on a built up that has a dependable drive system and an indexing system and a reliable bridge. If you search the ent I am sure there are sales on those things or maybe find one used some where.

Sorry to sound like a killjoy but I hate throwing good money after bad and thats what I did with that piece of junk, if you choose to do the same thats up to you. Check out CMR's  90' T/T it's $163.00 I have built theirs and it's a great kit well made and well engineered.

 

 

http://www.custommodelrailroads.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just my 2 cents worth, I spent the rest on trains. If you choked a Smurf what color would he turn?
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Posted by nedthomas on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 8:13 AM

Walthers posts the 90" turntable instruction sheet on line on their website. #933-2840. Good place to start. Look under technical resources..

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Posted by teen steam fan on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 9:49 AM

I am jerry rigging the wiring to suit my needs. This is actually going to be my first layout section wired for DCC. I am still working on the conversion.

If you can read this... thank a teacher. If you are reading this in english... thank a veteran

When in doubt. grab a hammer. 

If it moves and isn't supposed to, get a hammer

If it doesn't move and is supposed to, get a hammer

If it's broken, get a hammer

If it can't be fixed with a hammer... DUCK TAPE!

  • Member since
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  • From: Utica, OH
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Posted by jecorbett on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 10:59 AM

Allegheny2-6-6-6

 Trust me when I tell you this!

Stop your frustration and if you insist on keeping it and not throwing it in the trash where it belongs use it as a manual turntable and simply us logn enough wires to make a singe 359 degree spin. That means don't go all the way around multiple times make one almost complete revolution and then go back the other way. 

I actually took this a little farther. I just installed this TT on my branchline and it's sole function is to turn the steam loco end for end so it can make the return trip. It has a single lead track and no roundhouse or stall tracks to service. Therefore, I don't even need 360 degree operation. 180 degrees is sufficient which is good because the TT only operates about 200 degrees. The loco enters the TT and I rotate the bridge 180 degrees counter clockwise and the loco exits. Next time I rotate it 180 degrees clockwise. I use the operator's shack to keep straight which way to rotate it. I always rotate the shack inward away from the aisle. I can actually use the motor for this limited operation. Operating this way means I don't need to use the wipers. I ran the wires directly from the bridge to the connection with my auto reverser.  

I have to agree that this TT is a piece of junk. If I needed it to service a roundhouse, I don't think this limited operation would be useful. I had heard all the horror stories about this TT before I built it and discovered that the stories were accurate. Fortunately for me, I don't need full operation and it suits my purpose. If you can get by with limited operation like this, you might be content with this TT. If you need it to be fully operational, I think it will be a source of frustration for you. I've never read about anyone who got this TT to work the way it is suppose to.  

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Posted by MikeFF on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 11:14 AM
Alan Gartner has an excellent how-to on wiring turntables for dcc: www.wiringfordcc.com

Mike

 

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Posted by donhalshanks on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 1:15 PM

I had pretty decent results with this turntable, because I couldn't really afford a different one.  It works fine and goes 360 for me.  It can be done. 

Search the forums and you'll find threads from others with what it takes to make it work ....with patience.  As I recall the main things for me were to glue the styrene strips on the square seat underneath the pit to take out the wobble, file and round the ends of the bridge to be sure nothing touches the side wall as it goes around,  use an extra washer on the shaft to take out wobble, bypass wiring the the pick up collars (but leave them on the shaft) and run long wires out a hole cut in the motor box to handle the rotation of the bridge.  I found the latter was not an issue and the wires do not tangle as the bridge goes around.  The extra washer also tightened up the parts on the shaft, so that the teeth on the big gear wheel stayed engaged as it rotated.  I use an old DC train transformer to power it,  have the power set to make it move easily and steadily but no faster, use a push button switch on a console to give it power, and a throw switch on the console to reverse the power for changing the direction the turntable is to move. All track is powered with DCC from the layout. 

I worked on it at the work bench by setting the pit on a wood frame to lift it off the table top to clear for the stuff underneath.  I got it all working there, and then dropped it into the hole on the layout when it was ready to go.

I use it to service a 2-stall service building, 4 storage or repair tracks, and two tracks in and out to the layout.  The tracks are such that I seldom need to go 360 degrees and more. It is a  poor design underneath.  But it weathers nicely and is very realistic on top. 

Some types are handymen and figure they can get anything to work no matter how hard.  Others want it to come easier and quicker and go on to more modeling....which is ok too.  This turntable is definitely for the former.  If you have the money, you may want to bypass it.  But the challenge was there, and fun, and successful in the end.

Hal 

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Posted by teen steam fan on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 4:09 PM

Thanks for the advise, but I have it set up good enough for now. When I get the money to convert to DCC, I'll buy an auto reverser and wire the TT tracks that way. For now, it's set up fine.

If you can read this... thank a teacher. If you are reading this in english... thank a veteran

When in doubt. grab a hammer. 

If it moves and isn't supposed to, get a hammer

If it doesn't move and is supposed to, get a hammer

If it's broken, get a hammer

If it can't be fixed with a hammer... DUCK TAPE!

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: New Hampshire
  • 660 posts
Posted by sparkyjay31 on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 4:41 PM
If all else fails just think of it as an Armstrong turntable! Jay
  • Member since
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  • From: Utica, OH
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Posted by jecorbett on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 5:17 PM

sparkyjay31
If all else fails just think of it as an Armstrong turntable! Jay

Actually, this was Plan B if I hadn't been able to get the motorized unit working.

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