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Logging trestle

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  • Member since
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Logging trestle
Posted by tatans on Thursday, October 30, 2008 12:23 PM

So I start to build an HO logging trestle and find out they used far larger logs and timbers than standard wooden rail trestles, which is OK as I cut my own lumber to scale on my jig saw( I used hemlock) Twice I had to cut more lumber, it's amazing how much wood goes into a model. It is 18''x 7'' high, 2 large bents, 6 small bents with a large box frame in the middle. It seems to be a pretty standard trestle in the logging areas of British Columbia, it turned out great, THEN I get to painting and weathering the thing, I could have built 3 trestles in the time it took to paint it, I used craft acrylic with lots of water and grey to weather it.  Next time I will surely consider an Air brush, much faster and maybe as good a job as by brush, all in all it turned out great and thanks to a book Logging By Rail, the B.C. story I had lots of photos to guide me, The book was published in 1990 and is pretty rare, but full of information on logging.

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  • From: Southwest US
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Posted by tomikawaTT on Thursday, October 30, 2008 12:42 PM

Sounds great!  Nothing like following the prototype for optimum results.

Major bridges on the prototype for my narrow-gauge logging line (presently a static background feature) were steel, on masonry abutments.  Temporary track was built on continuous trestlework, low, followed the contours and looked as if it had been built from slash picked up off the forest floor...

I think there was a requirement that the line had to avoid disturbing the ground and the drainage.  Or, it might have been easier than trying to bring earthmoving equipment to the site through a tunnel not much larger than a one-car garage in cross-section.

Chuck (modeling Central Japan in September, 1964)

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Posted by gear-jammer on Thursday, October 30, 2008 12:47 PM

I used sticks from out back that I had dried for the logs  and bents.  There was much less weathering to do.  The hard part was to find two logs that match in diameter that were straight.

Do you have any photos of your trestle?

Sue

Anything is possible if you do not know what you are talking about.

  • Member since
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  • From: Vancouver Island, BC
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Posted by selector on Thursday, October 30, 2008 1:46 PM

And a fine trestle yours is, Sue (and Larry?).

Tatans, I cheated and went prototypical when it came to staining my timbers...I dipped the sucker in real creosote oil.  Wife wasn't thrilled first time she walked into the train room, but I assured her the smell would dissipate soon...and it had become unoticeable within three days.

I would advise those building a substantial treste, any trestle really, to dip the pieces in a white or light grey wash before construction, and to then spray the structure once completed with an alcohol-based India Ink wash to get it darker and more weathered.

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Posted by tatans on Thursday, October 30, 2008 1:49 PM

Nice photos, It seems logging in B.C. tended to use a lot of standard guage track, as opposed to narrow, and there were geared locomotives(Pacific Coast Shays) etc, but from the book it seems a lot of locomotives were typical steam, not huge, and a massive variety of types and makers, loggers here used a bunch of used cast-offs from standard railways so there was a great mixture of motive power along with improvising and creating equipment as needed, I guess that is what drew me to logging, you can be creative and still be sort of prototypical for the layout. Vancouver Island used diesels early on and had some odd looking units, some Baldwins and Alco's were prevalent and some strange GE things. 

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Posted by gear-jammer on Thursday, October 30, 2008 2:39 PM

The rickety log trestle is mine, and this is Larry's project.  He is finishing the last 2 bents and the girder for the middle span.  We both work differently so it has been a test.Laugh

Sue

Anything is possible if you do not know what you are talking about.

  • Member since
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  • From: Big Blackfoot River
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Posted by Geared Steam on Thursday, October 30, 2008 4:21 PM

Tatans

It's good to hear from another logging modeler, but your post is not as good without a PICTURE.

Smile,Wink, & Grin

GS

 Geared Steam's Blog

Railroads West, Always the Best


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  • From: Big Blackfoot River
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Posted by Geared Steam on Thursday, October 30, 2008 4:24 PM

gear-jammer

The rickety log trestle is mine, and this is Larry's project.  He is finishing the last 2 bents and the girder for the middle span.  We both work differently so it has been a test.Laugh

Sue

Sue

Awesome scenery, that is definately the northwest.

 Geared Steam's Blog

Railroads West, Always the Best


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Posted by tatans on Thursday, October 30, 2008 5:12 PM

My post is useless? I will have it removed immediatley.  You may notice that MOST of the posts do NOT include photos, If I had a camera, and if I took a 3 week course on how to apply the photo on this site, it might happen. SUE: nice trestle, sort of like mine(not curved) mine has a box frame connecting the middle bents, nice work, Pacific Coast eh?

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Posted by gear-jammer on Thursday, October 30, 2008 5:36 PM

Don't be concerned.  Everyone here likes to share in each others work.  You are just being prodded into sharing your work with us.    We are friends here.  I have posted photos from my cell phone before.   I use photobucket to transfer my photos.  When you are ready, we will help you.Thumbs Up

Sue

Anything is possible if you do not know what you are talking about.

  • Member since
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  • From: Big Blackfoot River
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Posted by Geared Steam on Thursday, October 30, 2008 9:39 PM

tatans

No disrespect, just want to see your trestle. As Sue says, I was just trying to get you to post a picture, I thought you have posted pics here before. At any rate, I edited my post. Wink

GS

 Geared Steam's Blog

Railroads West, Always the Best


  • Member since
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  • From: BC, CANADA
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Posted by Pathfinder on Thursday, October 30, 2008 9:56 PM

tatans

 Logging By Rail, the B.C. story

 

Great book.  Logging By Rail, the British Columbia Story.  Robert D. Turner.  Published by Sono Nis Press, Victoria BC, 1990.  Sono Nis Press is now based in the Okanagan area of BC.

My copy is signed too!

Mr. Turner is the former chief of historical collections at the Royal BC Museum (formerly the BC Provincial Museum) and has written many excellent books on transportation in BC.  If you can find copies of his Vancouver Island Railroads (1973 Golden West Books or the revised version, 1997 Sono Nis Press), there is lots if info on the Islands logging railways too.

And for you modern types, have a old logging trestle on your pike:

Picture is of an old Bloedel Stewart and Welch trestel south of Port Albernie, BC.  Taken in 2005.

Keep on Trucking, By Train! Where I Live: BC Hobbies: Model Railroading (HO): CP in the 70's in BC and logging in BC
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Posted by gear-jammer on Thursday, October 30, 2008 11:14 PM

COOL.

Anything is possible if you do not know what you are talking about.

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