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Walthers Switch Control System

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  • Member since
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Walthers Switch Control System
Posted by Don1942 on Thursday, May 30, 2019 7:48 AM

I have a two level DCC N scale layout. On the majority of my layout I use Peco turnouts with ground throws and have no problems but there are some areas where I need to use NCE's Snap-Its with Atlas turnouts and have derailments all of the time. I have to get rid of these Atlas turnouts.

I was looking into using the Walthers Control System and replacing the Atlas turnouts with Peco but I do not know if I can use the switch controlers due to the fact I use 1/8 inch plywood and 1 inch foam and even 2 inches of foam in some areas. From what I can find out it seems that the throw arm can only be adjusted up to 1/2 inch. 

Is there any way I can use the Walthers controllers? Need help. Thanks.

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Posted by RR_Mel on Thursday, May 30, 2019 9:24 AM

The Peco PL-10 switch machine works for both HO & N gauge.  I use the Peco PL-10 as a replacement for the Atlas #65 switch machines.  They require a large hole but easily covered with .02” sheet Styrene.
 
The Atlas turnouts require a modification (added Peco spring) to use a PL-10 but work great on Peco turnouts.
 
 
  
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by rrinker on Thursday, May 30, 2019 9:31 AM

 The Walthers machines themselves are insanely huge for what is really a tiny little servo. You might want to take a lo at am Valley Depot and their controllers. The actual mechanism that goes udner the layout to move the points is VERY tiny. I used this stuff on my last layout, and will be using it again, although with my own controller, on my new layout. My last layout had TWO layers of 2" foam plus 1/4" plywood, and there were no problems. Granted those were Atlas turnouts, but Pecos move just as freely once you remove the spring from the points.

 The servos themselves, are easily obtained from numerous sellers on eBay, usually about 6 of them for under $15. I used the Singlet controller, which have buttons and LEDs for local control and also are DCC stationary decoders, but depending on your needs there are other options that cost less per turnout by using one board to drive more servos, like the Octopus which drives 8 servos.

The tiny size of servos is perfect with multi-deck layouts where you want to reduce how far the stuff under the upper deck hangs down. 

                                    --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by RR_Mel on Thursday, May 30, 2019 9:46 AM

I totally agree with Randy, the micro 3.7G servo is tiny and very powerful.  I’m gradually replacing my switch machines with the SG90 servos, there a bit larger but easier for me to work with on HO turnouts.
 
 
 
They require a much smaller hole under the turnout.
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by rrinker on Thursday, May 30, 2019 2:49 PM

 Oh - I use the SG90/9G servos. I do have one or two of the 3.7G one laying around, they are strong enough to move an hinged HO or N scale turnout (Peco without the spring - not sure if the really tiny ones can overcome the spring easily) but the 9G ones aren't that much larger, and seem to be a bit cheaper. 

                                    --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by Don1942 on Thursday, May 30, 2019 3:33 PM

Took your advice and looked up the SG90 servos. They are advertised for RC planes and cars. Is there any source I can go to to learn how to use them on train layouts? Really have no idea of what a servo is. One reason I favored the Walthers was it seem to be a very simple plug and play type of control. Plus I could use my NCE Cab to control them on my DCC layout.

Late edit. I just went to Tam Valley Depot website and was looking into some of there products. Like I said I really don't even know what a servo is so I need to do some reading and video watching. The servo route may be a little too advanced for me. 

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Posted by York1 on Thursday, May 30, 2019 3:40 PM

I have several of the Walthers Horizontal switch machines for my N Scale.  I'm not sure they will reach through 2" of foam, but I think they would through 1".  They extend only about 1⅝ below the table.  They do cost more, about $18 or $19 on ebay, but the connections are easy and the fascia controls are also easy.  Extension wires all plug together.

With N Scale, the hole for the actuator wire only needs to be about ¼ wide, and that is even larger than needed.

 

Saints Fan John

Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room.

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Posted by rrinker on Thursday, May 30, 2019 5:11 PM

 The Walthers system IS servos. If you are buying a commercial controller, Walthers, Tam Valley, ro some other one, they are almost always "plug and play" - the servos have a cable with a 3 pin connector on it, that simply plugs in to the controller board. Plus 2 wires for a power supply to the controller. No more difficult than hooking up an Atlas Snap Switch to the control box. Easier, actually, since it's a plug, not wires to screw terminals.

The INCLUDED actuating wire with most devices of this sort, including Tortoises, is too short for 2" or multiple layers of 2" foam. But the fix is as close as the nearest hobby shop - even ones that have little or no trains. Music wire, or piano wire, is readily available and it's easy to replace the stock wire that comes with the turnout motor with a slightly stiffer and longer wire.

                                   --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, May 30, 2019 5:17 PM

This thread needs a pic of a servo with home built base, to give the rest of us an idea of how to use them. 

 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by RR_Mel on Thursday, May 30, 2019 6:45 PM

Ok Henry, how about my drawing of the SG90 for an Atlas turnout.
 
 
I’m always so deep into what I’m doing I forget to take pictures.  Randy likes the Tam Valley servo mounts, I just like tinkering around and building stuff myself.  The SG90 servo above will drop in a 1½” hole.
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, May 30, 2019 7:48 PM

So the servo is glued to the 4x4 styrene tubes?  Does the sheet styrene just cover up the holes or add strength?

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

  • Member since
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  • From: Reading, PA
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Posted by rrinker on Thursday, May 30, 2019 8:22 PM

 Plenty of pictures of how servos are installed on the Tam Valley site

http://www.tamvalleydepot.com/support.html

                                    --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • 4,077 posts
Posted by RR_Mel on Thursday, May 30, 2019 9:48 PM

BigDaddy

So the servo is glued to the 4x4 styrene tubes?  Does the sheet styrene just cover up the holes or add strength?

 

The sheet Styrene is used for the pivot hole for the throw rod between the servo arm and the moving tie.   
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
  • Member since
    February, 2019
  • 55 posts
Posted by DRGWGJCO on Thursday, May 30, 2019 11:01 PM

rrinker
Plenty of pictures of how servos are installed on the Tam Valley site http://www.tamvalleydepot.com/support.html

This site is new to me but it is great. I have RC planes and never thought of using servos for switch machines. This looks like a great idea to me. I am going to try these out.

Thanks to all who suggested it.

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