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What power input is this?

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What power input is this?
Posted by gthomson on Sunday, February 10, 2019 3:11 PM

Can anyone tell me what type of power pack or transformer I would need for this type of input plug? 

power input

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Posted by RR_Mel on Sunday, February 10, 2019 3:46 PM

More info please.  OD & ID of the shell and OD of the center pin.  What does it power?
 
 
 
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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, February 10, 2019 3:47 PM

I've never seen that type before, but I did do a little searching around, and it looks like this one, I repeat, LOOKS like:

https://sg.element14.com/lumberg/1614-15/chassis-socket-psu-panel-mount/dp/1243249

Not that it's a big help, but maybe you can track it down from there.

What does it say above that jack?  The right jack says Track Power.

Is this a European layout?  

Mike.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 10, 2019 3:52 PM

Henry

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 10, 2019 4:04 PM

It says Switch power.  Mike is in the running too. 

Whatever it is, it could be swapped out by an Ebay connector for less than the price of a powerball ticket.

If you are at work, I strongly suggest you not search "plug" on EbayEmbarrassed

Henry

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Posted by gregc on Sunday, February 10, 2019 4:07 PM

the thread on the outside confused me.  it looks like a a pretty standard DC connector that a wall wart plug into

what's the purpose?   does it provide a power so circuitry or is it track power?

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by betamax on Sunday, February 10, 2019 4:25 PM

gthomson

Can anyone tell me what type of power pack or transformer I would need for this type of input plug?  

Could be anything. You will have to take things apart to see exactly what is connected to this jack. There are too many variables to just guess at exactly what this jack is for.

 

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Posted by richg1998 on Sunday, February 10, 2019 4:49 PM

Specs? It does resemble an audio connector. I did audio many years ago.

Rich

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Posted by rrinker on Sunday, February 10, 2019 4:53 PM

 Yeah, the threads on the outside were throwing me off too, I'm used to PCB mounted sockets, not panel mounts for those types of plugs.

 I too lean towards the larger 2.5mm size, the smaller sizes ususally don;t have a split int he center pin. 2.5mm is a standard size used in many places. 2,1mm is more common these days, it seems, but the amount of current the connector cna handle is directly related to the size of the center pin.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 10, 2019 5:00 PM

I was totally focused on the plugs and missed the tamper proof screws as well as the question, what transformer. For some reason, I also thought phono plug size, but that is not the female end of a phono plug.

Just because I think I see Switch power, doesn't mean it is or still is, after all, there is a big hole where there is supposed to be Track Power.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, February 10, 2019 5:26 PM

Tamper proof screws?  I'm missing something.  The 4 screws that hold the cover plate on are common, not tamper proof.  Technical name is a Roberstson head.

If you look inside the track power hole, you see the same plug as the side we're all looking at.

I think the close-up picture had me thinking it was bigger.

Oh well, I guess I'll wait and see what it ends up being.

Mike.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 10, 2019 5:32 PM

mbinsewi
Tamper proof screws? I'm missing something. The 4 screws that hold the cover plate on are common, not tamper proof. Technical name is a Roberstson head.

From the Internet, (therefore it must be TRUE)  67 years of accumulating tools and I don't have any. Big Smile

The Robertson screw and screwdriver, the best kept The Robertson screw and screwdriver, the best kept secret outside of Canada. Robertson developed the socket head screw which revolutionized an industry

Henry

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Posted by rrinker on Sunday, February 10, 2019 7:07 PM

 My set that includes various tamper proof types includes Robinsons in various sizes. 

 When I saw the picture I figured the OP must be Canadian. Went back to the thread, well his avatar says Toronto Maple Leaf so I would assume that would be true. 

 Don't seem them much around here. It may be the one thing Canadians have kept to themselves. They've exported their beer, their bacon, and their favorite game. Laugh

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, February 10, 2019 7:18 PM

Those screws are all over out here.  My deck boards are scewed down using those.  All the hardware, lumber yards, and big box like Menards, Home Depot, and Lowes stocks them.

The clutch head is pretty popular too.  Kind of a reversed gear shape with teeth.  The old philipps are still around, but any of the others work better,  giving a better grip.

Yes there are couple of different sizes.

So,  I guess we wait for more info on the socket the OP shows.

Mike.

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Posted by gthomson on Sunday, February 10, 2019 7:52 PM

gregc

the thread on the outside confused me.  it looks like a a pretty standard DC connector that a wall wart plug into

what's the purpose?   does it provide a power so circuitry or is it track power?

 

thank you everyone for the responses and the help. I tihnk Greg has it as someone mentioned Wal Wart plug but I don't know what this is? 

It's not as complicated as it seems I don't believe. It's a trolley traction layout I inherited with ovehead and track power. The one connector is power to the overhead and track and the other is to the FROG switches but I don't understand why it wouldn't be a standard transformer?

I'm pretty much a newbie and understand hooking up a transformer to a track but not experienced with more complicated electronics.

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Posted by richg1998 on Sunday, February 10, 2019 8:19 PM

 

Well, that threaded arrangement will keep it captive.

 

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 10, 2019 8:23 PM

A wall wart is a generic name for a tranformer that plugs into the wall and supplies power. 12 V is common, but computer power sources are much higher.  It's an inexpensive power source available from Amazon or Ebay.

gthomson
The one connector is power to the overhead and track and the other is to the FROG switches

You just threw us a BIG monkey wrench.  All turnouts have frogs.  The frog is the little wedgie shaped thing where the rails diverge.  Frog power isn't A or B, but changes from A to B when the switch (turnout) is thrown.  Therefore it is never a constant.

There is something called a Frog Juicer, which is a DCC reverser, and figures out which polarity the frog needs right here and right now.  We don't know that you have one of those, but it could be powered by a wall wart and it would "know" what needs to happen down stream.

DCC reversers aren't compatible with DC systems.  So there is no equivalent of a Frog Juicer for DC. 

There are DC switch machines, like RIX which can power the frog.  25 years ago I powered the turnout with a momentary switch, but I don't remember how I did it.

Atlas can power the frogs too, but I'm not the one to explain that.  For sure, the power from the transformer doesn't go directly to the frogs.

I apologize for not knowing what a Robertson bit or screw is, I'm ignant. (sp)

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, February 10, 2019 8:54 PM

BigDaddy
I apologize for not knowing what a Robertson bit or screw is, I'm ignant. (sp)

Henry, I had to look up the real name, I (and just about everybody else that uses them) call them square head drive screw, there's a little one, and a bigger one. 

You go to any of the hardware stores and ask for the Robertson head screw, most of the clerks look at you funny.  

Anyway, wouldn't there have to be some kind of a controller/trottle between the wal wart and the layout?

As in his question "what power pack or transformer"

I mean you don't just plug in the wal wart in the wall, and into the layout, would you?  

I knew the enlarged photo was throwing me off.  It just looked like some huge jack.

Maybe the OP could show more pictures of what he's got.

Mike.

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Posted by gthomson on Sunday, February 10, 2019 9:00 PM

Huh, I did not know that the Robertson screw/screw driver was CDN but it had nothing to do with my inquiry and glad it provided some mystery to my southern brothers :) I guess my inquiry was a bit confusing. There are these 2 inputs for power; 1 powers the track and the other the 4 switches. I'm not familiar with powering a layout with a standard DC power supply (Wal Wart). I have dozens of Wal Warts which powered portable CD players, portable phones, etc.. Can any of these be used or do I need to ensure a specific voltage?

Sorry update, their are 4 tortoise switcher mechanisms which require power.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 10, 2019 9:02 PM

mbinsewi
Anyway, wouldn't there have to be some kind of a controller/trottle between the wal wart and the layout? As in his question "what power pack or transformer" I mean you don't just plug in the wal wart in the wall, and into the layout, would you?

mbinsewi
Anyway, wouldn't there have to be some kind of a controller/trottle between the wal wart and the layout? As in his question "what power pack or transformer" I mean you don't just plug in the wal wart in the wall, and into the layout, would you?

By all means, let's leave Robertson behind, it does the OP no good.

The picture lacked any reference to size, so it was open to interpretation.

To get back to your point, a tranformer has to power something:

  • Track
  • Turnout motors, aka switch machines
  • Accessories
  • Led indicators.
  • Mel's arduino stuff, which I barely understand Surprise

Now I see the OP has told us there are tortoise switch machines.  I'm still not sure if we are talking about a DC or DCC layout, so I have no more to say, at present.

Henry

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, February 11, 2019 12:39 AM

BigDaddy
...By all means, let's leave Robertson behind, it does the OP no good....

True, but when P.L. Robertson invented the socket-head screw, Henry Ford was highly impressed by the design, and sought a licensing agreement.  Unfortunately. Robertson turned him down, likely missing out on a golden opportunity, and dooming America, at least at that time and for some years longer, to life with the Phillips screw.

Wayne

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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, February 11, 2019 2:04 AM

mbinsewi
Henry, I had to look up the real name, I (and just about everybody else that uses them) call them square head drive screw, there's a little one, and a bigger one. 

Sorry to perpetulate the Robertson discussion, but there are actually five sizes. They all work really great.

I do apologise for Mr. Robertson's refusal to make a deal with Mr. Ford. If he had cut a deal the USA would have benefitted enormously, just like they have from Canadian snow birds, hockey, beer and donuts!Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughLaugh

Dave

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Posted by rrinker on Monday, February 11, 2019 6:44 AM

 Most of the screws Ford would have been using would be flathead, or slotted types, in that time period. As anyone who has lost a chunk of skin to the blade of the screwdrive slipping out of the slot will attest, those things were the worst.

 Anyway - on the original topic - have you done any investigation unerneath as to where those wires go? To power Tortoises, you will want something that puts out 9-12 volts, no higher. If there are only 4 of them, a rating of 125ma is more than sufficient. You can probably find a discard from a broken piece of equipment with the correct rating. 

 For the other one, if that goes to the overhead and the rail, then you need a variable power pack for DC, to control the speed and direction. Just need a plug to fit that socket, and some wire to connect the plug to the power pack's variable DC out to get some trolleys running.

                                         --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, February 11, 2019 6:47 AM

Never mind.  See Randy's post.  Smile, Wink & Grin

Mike.

 

 

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Posted by gregc on Monday, February 11, 2019 7:25 AM

gthomson
It's a trolley traction layout I inherited with ovehead and track power. The one connector is power to the overhead and track and the other is to the FROG switches but I don't understand why it wouldn't be a standard transformer?

maybe the trolley is self controlled and doesn't need a throttle, just power.   It could just run continuously with return loops or have some automation that stops the trolley at stations.  The turnouts could also be controlled automatically.

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, February 11, 2019 7:30 AM

Like the Lion's subway?  

Mike.

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Posted by gthomson on Monday, February 11, 2019 8:48 AM

there are 4 switches for the turn outs (which I didn't show in the image, my apologies) so these I change manually but I just a 12 V power supply that fits in? the power to the track is still a bit confusing.

I guess it could have been meant to just run non stop and the operations are just working the turn outs or like you said, I could get some kind of adaptor to go from my controller to the layout. I can include a picture of the layout if anyone is interested, the craftmanship is beautiful. Just wonder why they chose to power it that way? The layout came with numerous trolley magazines and articles so maybe I should scour through them to find an answer.

BTW Chris, great looking layout

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, February 11, 2019 9:17 AM

gthomson
the power to the track is still a bit confusing.

Yea it is confusing.  I think you need to figure out how it's powered and how it operates.

No body around from whom you inherited it from who might have a clue as to what made it go? How it's controlled?  No extra or unopened boxes that might contain some type of power pack or controller?

Did you have to move this layout to your place? (Just curious)

Lots of questions.

Pictures would great! 

Mike.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, February 11, 2019 9:50 AM

I missed your post that they were tortoises.  The power that makes the tortoises move is always different than the power to the tracks.  The tortoises may have connections to track power to power the frogs, if that makes sense.

Yes by all means we would like to see pictures.   How big a layout are we talking about?   It might be feasible to make a video with your cell phone, post it in youtube and link it here so people could take a look at the wiring. 

Henry

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Posted by gregc on Monday, February 11, 2019 10:10 AM

gthomson
Just wonder why they chose to power it that way?

this is a common connector for most power supplies that plug into a throttle.   That's why i suggested it might just be the power supply connection to automation circuitry.

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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