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NCE Cab-06 controlling (or not) a Walthers Plymouth

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  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,828 posts
NCE Cab-06 controlling (or not) a Walthers Plymouth
Posted by bearman on Sunday, February 03, 2019 10:20 AM

I was switching an industry with a Walthers Plymouth using one of my Cab-06's, the one with a line on the rheostat knob.  Trouble is, when I tried to stop the locomotive it kept going, both when it was in reverse and forward.  Had to hit the opposite direction on the CAb-06 to stop the Plymouth.  I tried to run another locomotive with the cab, and it appears to run the other loco with no problem, it stops when the knob is all the way over counterclockwise.  Is this a decoder problem?

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
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  • From: Reading, PA
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Posted by rrinker on Sunday, February 03, 2019 10:59 AM

 Is the track in that area maybe dirty? The Plymouth has a keep-alive built in, so if it didn;t see the speed 0 command, it would just keep right on going. Mine runs for several feet - off the rails and on the plastic sheet on top of my workbench! Does it happen consistently on all parts of your layout? What about when you use the big throttle, does it stop when commanded from that one?

                               --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
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  • From: Phoenix, AZ
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Posted by bearman on Sunday, February 03, 2019 11:39 AM

Randy, you da man!  The track is dirty, in fact I have been cleaning track for the past couple of days, but did not reach that industry section yet.  On the dirty track, the big throttle is hit or miss.  I moved the Playmouth to a section of track that was just cleaned this morning and both the big throttle and the Cab-06 work fine.

Conclusion:  dirty track.  Back to the denatured alcohol and elbow grease.

But your response begs the question as to what is a keep alive, and why is there one?

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
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  • From: Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada
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Posted by CNR378 on Sunday, February 03, 2019 12:00 PM

bearman

But your response begs the question as to what is a keep alive, and why is there one?

 
From Walthers website:
DCC-equipped units include built-in CurrentKeeper(TM) to maintain performance during brief power interruptions over switches and dirty track.
 
Peter
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  • From: Northeast OH
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Posted by tstage on Sunday, February 03, 2019 12:09 PM

A "keep alive" (KA - Trademarked by TCS) is a super-capacitor connected to (or built into) a decoder so that a locomotive can glide over "interruptions" in continuity on your track due to dirtiness or isolation (e.g. a dead turnout frog).  The smaller keep alives can power for 1-2 secs; while larger ones can go for upwards of 20 secs.

My MTH 20th Century Limited passenger cars came with keep alive modules.  It takes about 1 min. for the caps to charge up but there is ZERO flicker as it travels around the layout.  When power to the layout is turned off, it takes about 5 mins. before the LEDs go completely black.

Tom

http://www.newyorkcentralmodeling.com

Time...It marches on...without ever turning around to see if anyone is even keeping in step.

  • Member since
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  • From: Phoenix, AZ
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Posted by bearman on Sunday, February 03, 2019 12:32 PM

At this point, all I can contribute is that the Keep Alive in my Plymouth apparently is not only alive but doing very well.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
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Posted by rrinker on Sunday, February 03, 2019 12:42 PM

 That little short guy needs all the help it can get to run over even the tiniest bit of dirt. But I really think it has too much. Headlights on, full throttle, I can lift it off the rails and put it on my work bench and I have to pick it up a few times and move it back because it runs out of workbench. The new runs ar supposedly coming with ESU Lokpilot decoders. If they are using ESU's 3 wire power pack, it will be possible to set how long it keeps going via a CV. The ESU 3 wire types allow the decoder to shut off the power after a set amount of time, even if there is still charge left in the capacitor. This way you don't have a loco take off rampaging across your landscape if it derails.

 Some day if I feel ambitious enough I may try to get sound in this little thing. 

                                      --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,828 posts
Posted by bearman on Sunday, February 03, 2019 1:47 PM

Sound would be nice, but is there room in the shell for a speaker.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 26,093 posts
Posted by rrinker on Sunday, February 03, 2019 2:17 PM

 Well, those little GE 25 tonners from Grandt Line are even smaller, and they have been done with sound...

                                         --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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