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Wire new Bachmann motor to DCC

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JRP
  • Member since
    November, 2006
  • From: Upland, CA
  • 187 posts
Wire new Bachmann motor to DCC
Posted by JRP on Sunday, September 03, 2017 12:19 AM

Hi, I have been trying to wire this new Bachmann motor to DCC.  I tested this first on DC by attaching the black wires you see in the picture to my DC throttle.  The motor ran very well.  I then soldered the orange decoder wire (+) and the gray decoder wire (-) to the same points on the motor.  I also soldered the red right wheel pick ups to the wheel sets and the black left wheel pick up to the frame.  NOTE:  There are two small capacitors soldered to the motor, but I read that they could be cut off (were not necessary).  The decoder is a new Econami 100 (also tested and working).  My DCC throttle is the DCS-50 and I have JMRI hooked up.  Nothing happend.  No decoder light, no movement what so ever.  Any ideas on what I may be doing wrong (or not doing?  Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.

JRP

 

  • Member since
    October, 2006
  • From: Western, MA
  • 7,389 posts
Posted by richg1998 on Sunday, September 03, 2017 12:41 AM

No decoder light says no power to the decoder.

Check your connections with a multimeter. You should see 14 to 16 vac.

If no meter, a auto light would work.

You can short the two leads from the DCC controller. The controller will just shut down. When connected to the track, some do a quarter test. Quarter across the rail with shut down the controller proving there is power.

The past few years I have done all three.

Rich

N

  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • 2,112 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, September 03, 2017 8:18 AM

JRP
I tested this first on DC by attaching the black wires you see in the picture to my DC throttle. The motor ran very well. I then soldered the orange decoder wire (+) and the gray decoder wire (-) to the same points on the motor.

Just to be absolutely clear.  The orange wire went to the attachment of black wire A and the gray wire went to the attachment of black wire B?

Did you try a reset?

The capacitors were removed?

 
 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 22,970 posts
Posted by rrinker on Sunday, September 03, 2017 11:35 AM

 Does the loco actually pick up power through the frame? That's the old Athearn and Proto way. I thought Bachmann ran wires to both trucks.

                            --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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    January, 2015
  • 170 posts
Posted by RR Baron on Sunday, September 03, 2017 8:57 PM

JRP,

If you are installing the motor and decoder into one of the older model Bachmann HO locomotives with split frame, then --

Drill and tap 2-56 hole into each frame. Insert a 2-56 brass screw into each hole. 

Connect using the screws the decoder's Black wire to left frame and Red wire to right frame.

Also, make sure motor and lights are isolated from frames and each frame is correctly picking up power from the powered trucks.

 

RR Baron 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2006
  • From: Western, MA
  • 7,389 posts
Posted by richg1998 on Sunday, September 03, 2017 11:51 PM

Which Bachmann loco?

Rich

N

JRP
  • Member since
    November, 2006
  • From: Upland, CA
  • 187 posts
Posted by JRP on Monday, September 04, 2017 4:27 PM

RR Baron and others, thanks.  I was planning on using these Bachmann motors on Athearn frames and locos.  I have isolated the motor from the frame (using Kapton tape), I have that "swivel plastic strip" (It is the plastic cover plate that runs the length of the motor and isolates the can motor from the frame) face down on the Kapton tape to assure the motor is isolated.  I have the orange and gray wires soldered to each individual motor connection, the red right wheel pickup wires soldered to each wheel set, and a black wire soldered to a screw that I drilled and installed in the frame for left wheel pickup.  Theoretically the LED light on the decoder should light up when the power is applied thru my throttle.  But it shows nothing.  Yet the same motor runs when connected to DC.  I'm stumped!!  And yes, I removed those small capacitors from the motor.  What are those for anyway??

JRP 

  • Member since
    October, 2006
  • From: Western, MA
  • 7,389 posts
Posted by richg1998 on Monday, September 04, 2017 4:49 PM

The caps are used with the two 4.7 uhnry inductors for filtering. The UK and EU requires this.

Some Bachmann have wire wound inductors. Some ferrite inductors that look like green resistors.

No caps, the inductors are essentially a short piece of wire.

Again, no LED, no DCC voltage to the decoder. Assuming a good decoder. One or both pickup wires are not connected to the red and black wires into the decoder. You can verify with voltmeter.

Rich

N

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Posted by jjdamnit on Monday, September 04, 2017 5:37 PM

Hello all,

JRP
Yet the same motor runs when connected to DC. I'm stumped!!

It's metering time!

Using the continuity or buzzer function of your meter "trace" the electrical path(s).

I prefer to use the continuity or buzzer [➔+))) ] function rather than the resistance [Ω] function.

With my meter, it not only gives a visual reference of resistance but also an auditory indication of the strength of the electrical path.

Since you know the motor functions on DC you can eliminate that right off the bat.

I prefer to begin from the wheels to the motor.

Begin by placing one probe from the meter on a "powered" wheel. Then place the other probe on the corresponding wire that attaches to the decoder; Black or Red.
(Hint: you can use alligator clips on the ends of the probes.)

If all is well you should get a nice loud buzz or tone from you meter.

If you don't...

  • Check the wheel pickups. Sometimes these get bent or lose their ability to contact the wheel or axle depending on the arrangement.

With one probe still on the wheel see if you can get the tip of the other probe where the wheel wiper meets the wire to the motor. Most of these connections are soldered. Some are a set-screw. Make sure this connection looks solid.

Again, you should get an indication of continuity from your meter.

If you don't...

  • Check the wire(s) from the wheel pickups to the motor.

Keep one probe on the wheel pickup(s) and move the other probe from the wheel to the end of the wire that attaches to the motor.

Again, you should get an indication of continuity from your meter.

If you don't...

  • Look for breaks or kinks in the wire.

When I need to replace the wire(s) from the wheel pickups to the motor I pull and disassemble the truck(s) and gear tower(s). This makes soldering much easier.

Repeat on the opposite side.

Then on the other set of powered trucks (if applicable).

If you are using the frame as an electrical pathway, meter the points on the frame; screw heads, prongs, etc.

On some of the older Athern Blue Box locos you need to isolate the frame from the bottom of the motor and isolate the truck pickups from the frame. 

If you have not planned on using the frame as an electrical pathway make sure there is no crossover or shorts from the frame to the trucks or motor.

Put one probe on the wheel or wire to the motor and touch the other probe to various places on the frame.

You should get NO continuity! NO buzzer, NO tone, nothing, zilch!

If you do get an indication of unintended continuity you need to isolate that path.

Don't be afraid to jiggle wires and move trucks through their travel. 

With electrical contacts and connections there are always gremlins.

For no apparent reason replacing a wire or pickup will solve the problem(s).

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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