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Sinks and Toliets

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  • Member since
    May 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
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Sinks and Toliets
Posted by FRRYKid on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 10:38 PM

Got yet another for my Forum friends. What are the dimensions for sinks and toliets that were found in the original lightweight streamliners that ran from the 1930s to the 1970s and even a little beyond? I've seen pictures of commercially available interiors and kits that have those parts in them but for the number of cars. However, they are fairly expensive. As a result, I am building my own interiors. Thank you for any assistance that can be provided.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
  • Member since
    March 2017
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Posted by Track fiddler on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 11:42 PM

Sorry I ain't much one for telling stories

I'll just chalk this one up to the Amtrak train can and let someone else clear this one up so it doesn't end up so cloudy, swirly or Lord forbid Plungy

 

 

 

TF

  • Member since
    August 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 11:45 PM

There's lots of photos at the Barriger Library at Flickr from the ACF colletion that may be helpful to you.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/albums/72157649155982802

 

 Lot 3447033 by John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library, on Flickr

Trouble is, you have to sort through almost 5000 photos in this one album alone. High resolution Photos can be downloaded.

 Lot 3204 Neg 104825-G    007 by John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library, on Flickr

 lot 3140-H008 by John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library, on Flickr

Here are some floor plans, Pullman Standard C&O coach:

 Pullman_coach_edited-1 by Edmund, on Flickr

and one with the "serpentine" curved aisleways:

 Pullman_1a_edited-1 by Edmund, on Flickr

These are both C&O cars built for the "Chessie" from '47 to '51.

Hope that helps, Ed

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Posted by Track fiddler on Wednesday, October 14, 2020 12:17 AM

That did help Ed, ...Thanks

That 7550 plan was just the way I remembered it 20 years and an old train then 

I showed Judy the prints but she didn't seem to remember as well as I did but she did remember

 

But I remembered wellerStick out tongue

Whistling

 

 

LaughTF

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, October 14, 2020 10:58 AM

FRRYKid
...I am building my own interiors...

While I also enjoy adding details to models, and agree with the concept of making them, as opposed to buying them when the cost is too high, I wouldn't likely waste the time on adding those that would require disassembly of the model just to show them.
After all, those details won't even be visible through the windows, which are translucent.

I also "get" the idea of adding such details, just for the satisfaction of knowing that I could do so, but doing a number of such cars would take time away from other projects which could be more fulfilling, where the details are there, easily seen, whether the model is on a shelf or on your layout.

While I'll add seats and window shades, and eventually passengers, too, along with the partitions around the washrooms, nobody among those glued-to-their-seats passengers will ever use those washrooms, as they're all filled with blocks of lead...

...none of which are visible through the windows...



I'm not suggesting that you shouldn't model those details, but it's not something to which I would devote my time.

Wayne

  • Member since
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  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
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Posted by gmpullman on Wednesday, October 14, 2020 1:51 PM

doctorwayne
I wouldn't likely waste the time on adding those that would require disassembly of the model just to show them.

I agree —

Many of the Walthers Proto interiors are very well modeled yet in most cases there isn't even a window on the car to allow even a tiny peek:

 Superliner_population by Edmund, on Flickr

Another example is the Superliner kitchen, a beautiful rendition that is hidden behind solid styrene walls, no windows:

 Superliner_kitchen by Edmund, on Flickr

Walthers did a great job with the table placesettings and at least these can be seen, faintly, behind tinted windows:

 Superliner_tables by Edmund, on Flickr

Most of the detail in their heavyweight washrooms are hidden behind prismatic glass so the result is a barely recognizable interior.

Good Luck, Ed

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