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SP C-40-3 Caboose - What Is The Little Louvered Disc?

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  • Member since
    December 2010
  • From: Portland, Oregon
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SP C-40-3 Caboose - What Is The Little Louvered Disc?
Posted by Attuvian on Friday, January 17, 2020 12:33 AM

The photo shows the SP C-40-3 caboose on display next to the parking lot of a Portland OR nursery.  Someone at the business is keeping it in great shape!

Can anyone tell me what the little louvered disc is that's below and to the right of the car number?  Seems like a ventilator for something or other.  Does anyone make them as a detail part?

Thanks,

John

{Update]  Arrgghh! The photo showed in my draft window but disappeared when I posted it!  Let me try this again for those that deserve to see this superbly preserved caboose . . .

Tags: SP Cabooses
  • Member since
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  • From: Portland, Oregon
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Posted by Attuvian on Friday, January 17, 2020 12:40 AM

Attuvian

{Update]  Arrgghh! My photo showed in my draft window but disappeared when I posted it!  Let me try this again for those that deserve to see this superbly preserved caboose . . . 

 

Here we go:

(for a close-up, click on it twice, centering the cursor on it each time)

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Posted by doctorwayne on Friday, January 17, 2020 1:10 AM

Yeah, it definitely looks like a vent, but I don't recall seeing anything similar as a detail part.

The only vents of which I'm aware that might be suitable for a caboose are ones from Detail Associates, like those on this doodlebug:  the rectangle on the front below the front window, and another one on the upper area of the side, just behind the door...

 


They're DA part #229-1902, meant for roof or side mounting on diesels or cabooses.  They also offer three other styles, but none like on that caboose.

You may be able to create a facsimile, though, with a disc punched from thin brass or styrene, then use some Archer 3-D weld-bead decal to create a suggestion of the louvres.
Personally, I'd go with .002" or .003" brass shimstock, since the thinnest styrene available, as far as I'm aware, is .005", a little too thick.

Wayne

 

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  • From: Omaha, NE
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Posted by dehusman on Friday, January 17, 2020 7:40 AM

Its either a vent for the bathroom or a vent for an fuel storage area.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

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Posted by Attuvian on Friday, January 17, 2020 8:59 AM

dehusman

Its either a vent for the bathroom or a vent for an fuel storage area.

 
Thanks, Dave.  I'm inclined toward the former.  Was there a sanitary holding tank?  Forgot to mention that this pic and others found in Espee archives show them on the left (battery box?) side only, and perhaps for C-40s only.  Layout of the interior would probably answer the question of what they serve as.
  • Member since
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Posted by rrinker on Friday, January 17, 2020 9:19 AM

 Yep, a floor plan would be your friend here. As for the toilet - when built I doubt they had a holding tank. Even passenger cars didn;t have holding tanks - hence the signs to not use the toilet when sitting at a station stop! Later in life they would have - assuming they lasted in service that long.

                               --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by dknelson on Saturday, January 18, 2020 11:58 AM

In terms of modeling that small vent, I think just about any applied detail part would seriously overdo its thickness and the visibility from a "modeled" normal viewing distance of the parallel louvers, which look thinner than a human finger.  I would think a punched out circle of the thickest decal paper you have handy would be about the correct thickness - unless you have some extremely thin styrene. 

Modeling the tiny louvers without overdoing it is a challenge too.  I wonder if very precise and controlled scribing with a dental pick into the surface of the caboose side, followed by applying the small disc of decal paper over it, followed by SolvaSet or other decal solvent, would capture this believably.  While the louvers are not indentations, if the decal settles into the small striations in the surface it might capture this look, once it is painted over.

Or not.

Having just written this I confess that my hand and eye are no longer capable of the fine work I am proposing.  But I am full of good ideas for those with more ability than I have.

Dave Nelson

 

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  • From: Portland, Oregon
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Posted by Attuvian on Saturday, January 18, 2020 1:06 PM

To be frank about it, guys, my questions were more out of curiosity. The more I'm reading here, the more the modeling aspect of one of these gizzies becomes an exercise in hype-accuracy.  I dare not use the common term for this aspect of the hobby as I don't want to stir the pot too much on a Saturday. Wink

John

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