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AC44 Long hood forward

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AC44 Long hood forward
Posted by BigDaddy on Friday, May 04, 2018 6:17 PM

This was discussed in Jeffreys Diner, but others may have more knowledgeable opinions.

The 360 Webcam at Deshler OH faces an ethanol plant.  There were two locos, nose to tail leading the train.  They left the train, turned in the wye, hooked up to the train and led long hood forward.  Not what the couch potato railfans expected. 

Modern isn't my era, but the Internet says CSX 74 is an AC44.  So we are not talking about RS or early GP's running short or long hood forward 50 years ago.  Someone in the diner thought maybe the cab signaling was down in the original lead loco.  Any other thoughts?

 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by BRAKIE on Friday, May 04, 2018 9:44 PM

BigDaddy
Someone in the diner thought maybe the cab signaling was down in the original lead loco.

Thats one possibility the other being the horn or ditch lights stopped working.

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.
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Posted by pajrr on Saturday, May 05, 2018 3:36 AM

Maybe the train was bein rearranged for the trip back home and the wye was the only place to turn the locomotives, even though it was not quite to its outbound destination yet. That is quite common. In Erie RR steam days, there were trains on one line where the entire train was turned and then backed 3 miles, passengers and all, to the final station. The reason? The locomotives were too big for the old turntable in the destination yard.

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, May 05, 2018 2:38 PM

Periodically the local turn on the ex-Southern NS line through East Memphis and Collierville will have a 4400hp GE running long-hood first, most recently (about a week ago) coupled to another locomotive, so likely not a 'failure' issue that could be solved by switching the consist around.  Ditch lights operating on the 'front' and bell continuously sounding; I suspect running at some restricted speed and perhaps slowing approaching areas with many grade crossings, but certainly not dawdling.

This likely involves operational switching concerns, as I don't recall any locomotive operating westbound with the long hood leading.

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Posted by wjstix on Monday, May 07, 2018 9:47 AM

Just to clarify, the earlier discussion(s) re long-hood vs. short-hood really don't have anything to do with this situation. I can't imagine a 1955 railroad train lead by two RS-3s working backwards together stopping the train and going thru a wye to reverse their direction just so they were now both pulling forward. Railroads bought road switchers like GPs and RS units in part specifically because they ran equally well in either direction.

Stix
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Posted by jeffhergert on Monday, May 07, 2018 10:23 AM

I believe both CSX and NS have ditch lights on the back end of their modern road power.  I know I've been on NS wide nose engines that have a speedometer on the back wall of the cab to aid the engineer when running "backwards." 

Someone mentioned cab signals.  I would think if the lead locomtive lost it's cab signals, or anything else that made it unsuitable to lead, they would just rearrange the consist.  It begs the question if CSX units are equipped for cab signals in both directions?  That would require receiver gear on both ends.  It's allowed by the FRA to run without cab signals when they fail enroute, but indivdual railroads may have more restrictive rules.

Jeff 

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Posted by BRAKIE on Monday, May 07, 2018 11:11 AM

jeffhergert
I would think if the lead locomtive lost it's cab signals, or anything else that made it unsuitable to lead, they would just rearrange the consist.

I mention the cab signals because I've  seen NS do both ways. The why part I do not know.

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.
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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, May 07, 2018 2:22 PM

I'm going with PAJRR's idea.  Getting repositioned where there is room.  Who knows what it's like at the ethanol plant, or it's staging yard.

These are not 1950'3 RS's, or steam swithchers, these are are big honkin road diesels, in 2018.

Wonder if we'll ever find out.  What say the chat group on the camera, Henry? any inkling on what was found?

Mike.

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Posted by ricktrains4824 on Sunday, June 03, 2018 8:41 PM

I would say, if it wasn't what PAJRR has suggested, that it would have to have been an issue with the lead unit otherwise, and they were changing to the other unit to lead with.

It could be anything from a failure in the air conditioning system, to something more serious. 

But, I would be willing to say it was PAJRR's suggestion ias more likely.

Ricky W.

HO scale Proto-freelancer.

My Railroad rules:

1: It's my railroad, my rules.

2: It's for having fun and enjoyment.

3: Any objections, consult above rules.

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