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Jeeps, err, I mean Geeps as in GPs...

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Jeeps, err, I mean Geeps as in GPs...
Posted by NWP SWP on Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:05 PM

I have a few questions about Geeps like the early ones as in GP9/10s.

1. What is the box like thing that is behind the cab on GP10s, it looks like a modified air intake of some sort, what is it?

2. On some GP9s and 10s, what's the box on the roof at the end of the long hood?

3. On Milwaukee units what's the point in the spark arrestors on some units, did other roads so equip their units with them?

4. On Milwaukee units what's the purpose of the bay window things on the cabs of some units?

Thanks.

Steven

Crooner, Imagineer, High School Graduate, living with Aspergers, President of the Republica Pacifica micronation,  President of the NWP-SWP System.

Hook'em Longhorns! 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:38 PM

With out a doing a search of the locos you ask about, the "bay window" thing is  usually only on the engineers side, and it is called an all weather window.  These were helpfull for a road unit/ road switcher so the engineer could lean out and look to the rear, and not be pellted by rain, snow, etc. 

The box on top of the long hood is probably a winterization hatch.  They are used over one of the radiator fans, so warm air, instead of being expelled by the radiator fan, could be directed back into the engine compartment.

The hood that is behind the cab, is exactly what you think it is, and I can't think of the name for these.  I think they are called a "Horst" ox-yoke style air intake hoods.

The spark arrestor things might be because of certain areas that the switcher worked.  Not sure why some had, and some didn't.

Mike.

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Posted by bogp40 on Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:42 PM

Steven,The box behind the cab (usually fireman's side) is an electrical cabinet. These may vary in placement and size from differing roads.

The box on the long hood is a winterization hatch usually used in cold climates and is placed oer the last fan.

The window boxes are all weather windows also used in cold climates. The protruding "bay window' provides an engineer's better forward or back view without opening the window (slider)

Spark arrrestors are just that, actual use on different units baffles me, may be added when shopped,

Modeling B&O- Chessie  Bob K.  www.ssmrc.org

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Posted by NWP SWP on Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:53 PM

Mike has the right idea I'm thinking of Horst Ox-Yoke Intake Hoods, the question now is what was their advantage?

The all weather window makes sense.

It must be a winterization hatch I was seeing.

And the spark arrestor thing is still a little confusing, I didn't know that a diesel engine in normal operation spew sparks.

Just did a search for "Horst air intake" turns out that they're some sort of filter for the intake.

Steven

Crooner, Imagineer, High School Graduate, living with Aspergers, President of the Republica Pacifica micronation,  President of the NWP-SWP System.

Hook'em Longhorns! 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Saturday, April 14, 2018 11:15 PM

If I remember, Horst also made air filters and intake manifolds that were used on race cars.

The air intake, for locomotives, went though some changes. The early version used an oil bath type, which was a mess to change, and the newer use the paper filter box, which made replacement a lot easier and cleaner.

The advantage of the Horst filter, it was a direct air intake.

They were found usually on GP9 rebuilds.

Mike.

 

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Posted by jeffhergert on Sunday, April 15, 2018 6:20 PM

mbinsewi

With out a doing a search of the locos you ask about, the "bay window" thing is  usually only on the engineers side, and it is called an all weather window.  These were helpfull for a road unit/ road switcher so the engineer could lean out and look to the rear, and not be pellted by rain, snow, etc. 

Mike.

 

The times I've had to switch with them on yard jobs or locals I didn't find them that good.  You can't lean out enough to really see the trainman/switchman more than a few cars back.  I'd rather be able to fully open the window and get wet and be able to lean out enough to see the ground man.

Jeff 

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  • From: Mpls/St.Paul
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Posted by wjstix on Sunday, April 15, 2018 10:38 PM

NWP SWP

I have a few questions about Geeps like the early ones as in GP9/10s.

First, just to clarify things...the first GP was the GP-7, first introduced 1949, followed by the GP-9 in 1954. They had short hoods, as did most of the GP-18 and many of the GP-20 engines that started being made in 1959.

The name "GP-10" came from a program of Illinois Central's in the 1970's, upgrading/rebuilding early GPs with things like improved electronics and a "chopped nose" low short hood. EMD never made a GP-10, nor were any around in the 1950's-60's.

2. Without a pic of what you mean, it's kind of a guess, but you might be seeing a winterization hatch. These were placed over one fans on the roof, and allowed hot air from the body of the engine (that normally would be vented out of the engine in hot weather) to be kept inside the engine in cold weather. It had vents that the crew could open or close to keep air in or to vent it out. It's a little bit like the setting on your car's A/C that allows you to either bring in air from outside to cool down, or to recirculate cool air (like when the car has been sitting in the sun and you're trying to cool it down fast).

Stix
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Posted by NWP SWP on Sunday, April 15, 2018 11:03 PM

I'm petty sure it's a winterization hatch I'm seeing.

Steven

Crooner, Imagineer, High School Graduate, living with Aspergers, President of the Republica Pacifica micronation,  President of the NWP-SWP System.

Hook'em Longhorns! 

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