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The Little Things

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The Little Things
Posted by The Jet Clipper on Thursday, April 12, 2018 9:25 PM

There are few small things, relating to E and F Units, so without further ado...

  • What are those little things mounted on the Union Pacific's E8/9 units? The things that look like car spoilers on the hatches
  • What are alternates to MU doors on the nose?
  • How long were the drop grabs on the nose?
  • Who makes pre-molded grabs that were used on the sides of the nose? The ones that came on the F and E Units of a few roads standard with their intial deliveries (UP, GN, NP, SP)
  • What's the significance between a single light and dual light (one nose, one door) unit? 
  • Were E Units ever used for freight outside of the Rock Island. I heard that the Erie Lackawanna used them, but I haven't seen a picture
  • Member since
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Thursday, April 12, 2018 9:55 PM

The Jet Clipper

There are few small things, relating to E and F Units, so without further ado...

  • What are those little things mounted on the Union Pacific's E8/9 units? The things that look like car spoilers on the hatches
  • What are alternates to MU doors on the nose?
  • How long were the drop grabs on the nose?
  • Who makes pre-molded grabs that were used on the sides of the nose? The ones that came on the F and E Units of a few roads standard with their intial deliveries (UP, GN, NP, SP)
  • What's the significance between a single light and dual light (one nose, one door) unit? 
  • Were E Units ever used for freight outside of the Rock Island. I heard that the Erie Lackawanna used them, but I haven't seen a picture
 

OK, I will answer a few of these. 

Not a UP modeler, would need a picture for that question.

Front MU connections - If I recall correctly, EMD did not think it would happen much, so as delivered it could only be done by leaving the nose door open, there was an MU receptacle inside the door. Once railroads decided they needed to do it, they cut little hatches in the nose or mounted the receptacle above /next to the door. 

One headlight or two? - locos with two have a regular headight and a Mars light. Different roads made different choices about that.

Yes, the Erie Lackawanna used their E units for freight after passenger service declined.

Just because you can't find a photo, does not mean it never happened......

I would bet a few others pressed E units into freight service from time to time, but the Erie and theRock are known for using them regularly for freight. The Erie did regear them for the job.....

Sheldon

 

    

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  • From: Omaha, NE
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Posted by dehusman on Thursday, April 12, 2018 10:02 PM

Dave H. Painted side goes up.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, April 12, 2018 10:17 PM

PRR very famously tried E units on some of the TrucTrain consists, as the need for passenger power began to fall off.

This led to comedy fairly quickly as freight engineers, used to automatic backward transition on F units, discovered Flashover City when trying to operate E units a little forgetfully ...

  • Member since
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  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
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Posted by gmpullman on Thursday, April 12, 2018 11:14 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
Yes, the Erie Lackawanna used their E units for freight after passenger service declined.

 

 EL E8A 826 at 130th St. and Torrence Ave., Chicago, IL on November 25, 1966 by Marty Bernard, on Flickr

Photo by Roger P u t a public domain.

I've seen E8s used on freights, but most frequently the UPS trains, on the E-L through Ohio in the early 1970s. I've seen a few photos of PAs in freight service on the E-L, too.

Regards, Ed

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  • From: Mpls/St.Paul
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Posted by wjstix on Friday, April 13, 2018 2:29 PM

The Jet Clipper

Who makes pre-molded grabs that were used on the sides of the nose? The ones that came on the F and E Units of a few roads standard with their intial deliveries (UP, GN, NP, SP)

I believe several companies make suitable grabs, maybe try a search on Walthers website. Note that if you mean (as I assume you do) the grabirons on one side of the nose of E or F unit, those were required to be added in the early 1960's - after E and F unit production ended. I don't know that any railroads bought engines with grabs like that; I think it was all retrofit to the engines later.

The Jet Clipper

What's the significance between a single light and dual light (one nose, one door) unit? 

 

The first standard production E and F units had one headlight, the one in the upper position. Some railroads added a second light in the door on the nose of the engine, usually to house a flashing Mars light on engines used in passenger service. Most railroads found that it worked better to have the regular headlight be the lower one, and have the upper be the Mars light. Some railroads also had a red upper light that would go on in an emergency stop situation. Some railroads (like New York Central) only used one headlight on their passenger engines, but in general if you see and E or F unit with two headlights, it's a passenger or dual-service engine.

Stix
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    February, 2015
  • 201 posts
Posted by NHTX on Saturday, April 14, 2018 4:19 PM

     Maine Central regeared some E-7s and used them in freight service after the cessation of passenger service.  The New Haven's PA-1s ran out their final years in freight service.  They were regular power on a job known as the "Drop" which worked the non-electrified yards and sidings between the New York City area and New Haven.  They also appeared on piggyback trains between New York and Boston on a regular basis. Railroads that had both E units and PA's were more apt to choose the Alcos over the E's for freight service due to the robust GE electricals.  After all, New Haven was one of the pioneers in the dual-service diesel concept when they used their DL-109s on passenger trains in the daytime and freights at night.

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