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Reporting Mark Placement on Double Door Boxcars

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  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Reporting Mark Placement on Double Door Boxcars
Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, March 04, 2018 10:32 AM

I was told a long time ago that on double door boxcars the reporting marks had to be positioned so that they would still be visible when the doors were fully opened.

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Looking at this Accurail model of a CENTRAL OF GEORGIA boxcar, that does not seem to be true. I did an an image search, and it absolutely is not true. In fact, I could not find a single example of a car that WAS NOT obscurred when the doors were open.

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So, was it ever a rule that the railroad initials and car number had to be visible with the doors open?

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-Kevin

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Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
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  • 6,142 posts
Posted by 7j43k on Sunday, March 04, 2018 11:01 AM

SeeYou190

I was told a long time ago that on double door boxcars the reporting marks had to be positioned so that they would still be visible when the doors were fully opened.

 

So, was it ever a rule that the railroad initials and car number had to be visible with the doors open?

 

No.  It was not a rule.  I just did a very quick look at a picture book of freight cars, and found exceptions to that "rule" right away.

Hence:

 

NO.  It was not a rule.

 

But it would be a convenience not to have the reporting marks covered, on that day when someone would like to read them.  But, clearly, some railroads did not take that into consideration in their painting diagrams for these cars.

 

 

 

Ed

  • Member since
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  • From: California - moved to North Carolina 2018
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Posted by DSchmitt on Sunday, March 04, 2018 3:58 PM

Reporting marks are also painted on the ends of the car where they are not hidden by an open door. 

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

  • Member since
    August, 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 8,443 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, March 04, 2018 5:08 PM

DSchmitt
Reporting marks are also painted on the ends of the car where they are not hidden by an open door. 

In addition, thewre would be stenciling on the inside of the doors and overhead on the "side plate" or door header:

 PRR_X51 by Edmund, on Flickr

I have seen photos of cars inside large warehouses where the configuration of loading bays would make it difficult to see much of the outside of the cars. Clerks and loaders would have to rely on the interior markings.

Thank You, Ed

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 7:35 AM

gmpullman
Clerks and loaders would have to rely on the interior markings.

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Wow, I had no idea there were markings inside the car. Your explanation makes perfect sense and something I never considered.

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Strange, because I have been in lots of warehouses where the only thing visible is the inside of a van trailer, and they are all well marked on the interior so the forklift operator can identify the correct trailer. I should have assumed railroads did the same thing!

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I am amazed some times at how little I know.

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-Kevin

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Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
  • 9,538 posts
Posted by dehusman on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 8:31 AM

Wow, I had no idea there were markings inside the car. Your explanation makes perfect sense and something I never considered.

There are also reporting marks on the frame and sometimes on the trucks.  During the 1970's a shortline was taking PC boxcars, repainting them for the shortline and putting them out as their cars.  They got caught when people noticed that the frames and inside had different reporting marks and they were still valid.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

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    January, 2015
  • From: Southern California
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Posted by Lone Wolf and Santa Fe on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 1:15 PM

Looking at my collection of double door boxcars I think only the Burlington Northern car has a number that gets coverered when the door is open. All of the other roads look like the number is far enough to the left that it is clear.

http://www.trainweb.org/lonewolfsantafe/bn247908.jpghttp://www.trainweb.org/lonewolfsantafe/cop7341.jpghttp://www.trainweb.org/lonewolfsantafe/lp52010.jpghttp://www.trainweb.org/lonewolfsantafe/summit2.jpghttp://www.trainweb.org/lonewolfsantafe/uo1524.jpghttp://www.trainweb.org/lonewolfsantafe/yw25134.jpg

Modeling a fictional version of California set in the 1990s Lone Wolf and Santa Fe Railroad

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