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Data Placement

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  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 1,525 posts
Data Placement
Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, February 12, 2018 12:56 PM

On another thread, Rick J. posted a picture of a NEW HAVEN box car that has the initials, number, and weight capacities on the right side of the door (when looking from the side).

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I always thought that this was supposed to be on the left of the door.

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Was this just a common practice, or was it required at some point?

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I have a couple of decal sets with large heralds like that NH car has, and this would make decal placement much easier.

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • 4,760 posts
Posted by 7j43k on Monday, February 12, 2018 1:18 PM

If New Haven did it, it must have been "legal".

If you want to do it, too, I think that would be "legal", also.  Yes, unusual.  But you already noted that.

If the New Haven car is dramatically out of your era, I can see your concern.

 

Is it?

 

Ed

  • Member since
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  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
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Posted by "JaBear" on Monday, February 12, 2018 3:28 PM
Gidday Kevin, this link should help you decal your free lanced cars, without having a guilty conscience!! Wink
 
 
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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  • From: Canada, eh?
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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, February 12, 2018 10:54 PM

The Pennsy had house cars, usually automobile cars, with the lettering positioned the reverse of what might be called "normal"...

...and a quick check in a book of freight car photos showed similar examples from Wabash, Seaboard, Maine Central, New York Central, and Northern Pacific.

Wayne

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 2:27 AM

doctorwayne
The Pennsy had house cars, usually automobile cars, with the lettering positioned the reverse of what might be called "normal".

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On a double door boxcar that kind of makes sense. The car number can still be easily read with the door open.

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Nordonia Hills, OH
  • 1,446 posts
Posted by dti406 on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 7:27 AM

7j43k

If New Haven did it, it must have been "legal".

If you want to do it, too, I think that would be "legal", also.  Yes, unusual.  But you already noted that.

If the New Haven car is dramatically out of your era, I can see your concern.

 

Is it?

 

Ed

I also remember reading where the New Haven got in trouble with the AAR as the door covered the capy and load limity information, and they had to change the way the lettered the cars when they were repainted.

The Wabash was one railroad that many times reversed the normal layout and had the capy data on the left and the reporting marks on the right and there was no rhyme or reason which car was that way or the normal way.  The Wabash also left a space between the last 3 digits of the car number and the leading digits.

Rick Jesionowski

Rule 1: This is my railroad.

Rule 2: I make the rules.

Rule 3: Illuminating discussion of prototype history, equipment and operating practices is always welcome, but in the event of visitor-perceived anacronisms, detail descrepancies or operating errors, consult RULE 1!

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 1,525 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, February 15, 2018 10:45 PM

Gidday Kevin, this link should help you decal your free lanced cars, without having a guilty conscience!!

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Hey Bear,

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I have used that sheet as a guide for as long as I can remember. If you look over pictures of the freight cars I have posted, they follow those guidelines pretty close.

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The exception is the flat cars. I letter mine differently as far as positioning goes. I just don't like where they say to put the loading weights. I have looked at lots of pictures of prototype flat cars, and these seem to be much more random for where data gets placed. Maybe because there is so little space and no door to obscure the data.

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Thanks!

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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