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What Was (Is?) a Crawlair?

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  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Portland, Oregon
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What Was (Is?) a Crawlair?
Posted by Attuvian on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 12:19 AM

May as well start here as elsewhere.  I've just been combing through the Southern Pacific MoW Car Roster of January, 1956.  Among other fascinations, I noted 9 of their former B-50 revenue boxcars that were placed in MoW service in '52 and '53 and associated with "crawlair" use.  The first three (MW 755, 756 and 760) add "compressor" after crawlair.

What kind of contraption was (still is?) this crawlair and for what was it used?  Are their any photos out there?  Not sure that what I find on the 'net under this likely trade-name term is related particularly to railroad use 65 years ago.

John - in smokey Portland (forest fire ash coating local cars and garden RRs this evening)

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 2:40 AM

Attuvian
What kind of contraption was (still is?) this crawlair and for what was it used?  Are their any photos out there?

Just speculating here but Crawlair was an Ingersoll Rand brand name for a rock drill.

http://ewdrilling.com/Products/Details/20419/Ingersoll-Rand-ECM-350-Crawler-Air-Rock-Drill-SOLD

See the nameplate photo "I-R Crawlair"

 I imagine that the S-P had enough rock to push through that they may have invested in these machines. The cars probably had a good-sized air compressor along with tools and equipment to maintain the machines.

Regards, Ed

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Posted by DSchmitt on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 4:05 AM

gmpullman probably correct 

Crawlair - a drilling machine - mounted on crawler treads

http://www.prattandsons.com/uploads/misc/1302615627_IR-ECM350-Crawlair.pdf

---------

a type of crawler

Railway Age Vol 91  (1931) has two referencences to "crawler"  

https://books.google.com/books?id=3XNCAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA507&lpg=PA507&dq=southern+pacific+crawler&source=bl&ots=pomM8nDkH5&sig=wv6QU1j5AOXUeJPolH1pw_bHx6M&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiumoDD043WAhVGwVQKHZ8OAzgQ6AEISzAL#v=onepage&q=southern%20pacific%20crawler&f=false

 

Page 314

A tractor equiped with crawler threads for rough ground - equipped with bumpers for pushing or accessories for special uses - such as cranes, power brooms or plows.

Page 507

Photo of crawler mounted dragline at Donaldsonville Pit (Lousiaiana)  - which supplied material for doubletracking a portion of the Texas & Pacific. 

 

 

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

  • Member since
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  • From: Portland, Oregon
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Posted by Attuvian on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 8:51 AM

Thanks, guys.  Finally dawned on me after thinking about maintenance, deveopment and expansion of roadway. Surely toted these things around on their flat cars. Interesting feature of the Car Roster is how many of their MoW flats were created from former box cars.

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  • From: Reading, PA
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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 9:07 AM

 I remember those things well. My Dad and Grandfather both worked for IR, though neither at the division that made the drilling machines. Though after he retired, my Grandfather took a night watchman job at the Rock Drill division plant - in the summer I would occasionally go to work with him, lots of neat equipment in that building.

 ANd shortly after we moved to the house I spent most of my early life in, they installed public sewers. I remember seeing one of these work its way down the street.

                           --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by j. c. on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 11:46 AM

ran a twin boom  IR drill in mine when they were sloping down to next coal seam but don't remember is being a crawlair brand but it was made for underground use, but man could it drill  and a lot easer than a jackleg.

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  • From: Nordonia Hills, OH
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Posted by dti406 on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 12:50 PM

In the 1980's the Ingersol Rand Units were replaced with TamRock's

Rick Jesionowski

Rule 1: This is my railroad.

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Rule 3: Illuminating discussion of prototype history, equipment and operating practices is always welcome, but in the event of visitor-perceived anacronisms, detail descrepancies or operating errors, consult RULE 1!

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Posted by maxman on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 1:51 PM
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Posted by Bayfield Transfer Railway on Wednesday, September 06, 2017 3:44 PM

A "crawlair" is a French cruller.

 

Disclaimer:  This post may contain humor, sarcasm, and/or flatulence.

Michael Mornard

Bringing the North Woods to South Dakota!

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Posted by Attuvian on Friday, September 08, 2017 11:58 AM

You're a man after my own heart, Michael.  My 'Net connection has been out for a few days, hence the tardiness of this response.  Good humor deserves better.

John

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