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Brake Hoses on locomotives?

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Posted by Allegheny2-6-6-6 on Thursday, July 9, 2009 9:47 PM

 Sargent coupler are what they use I ordered a bunch today, not cheap but I feel their worth the money. FYI you can use the magnetic uncoupler from Ricks Products without the trip pin aka ugly looking fake hose I tried it several times and it works fine. I'm not sure about the under tack magnets becasue none are in place as of yet. but shouldn't be too hard to mock up tomorrow.

Just my 2 cents worth, I spent the rest on trains. If you choked a Smurf what color would he turn?
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Posted by wjstix on Thursday, July 9, 2009 5:59 PM

Well the trip pin / hoses are usefull in creating derailments when they catch on the track going thru a turnout - usually while you're showing the layout to someone.

Another alternative would be looking into Sergeant uncouplers, they look and operate more like the real ones. Since I found the magnet uncouplers didn't work that well for me, I've thought about the Sergeant ones but not sure I want to re-equip 200+ cars and locomotives at this point.

Stix
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Posted by cv_acr on Thursday, July 9, 2009 5:25 PM

Allegheny2-6-6-6

Finally some one who understands the question, so it's primarily there for function so I guess cutting them off isn't a good idea then.......lol

If you don't use magnets to uncouple, you can easily do away with the "trip pins." A lot of modellers do, because not having that thing dangling from the coupler head itself is more realistic. Then, a proper brake hose detail is put on the car _beside_ the coupler, where it is located in real life.

So if you don't plan to ever use magnets to uncouple on your layout, by all means, cut them off.

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Posted by fwright on Thursday, July 9, 2009 9:45 AM

Allegheny2-6-6-6

wjstix

 

Allegheny2-6-6-6

 I was on the "Details West" website earlier marveling at some of the example of the super detailing kits on various models and noticed that most of them had couplers with no hose or should I say simulated hose connected to it. Is this becasue the MU hoses would be hooked to the first car in the consist?

Kadee and Kadee-clone model couplers have an uncoupling device sticking out under them to simulate a brake hose that would be connected between couplers in a set of cars or between a car and a locomotive. Real couplers don't have hoses that stick out like that when they're not connected to anything...so a modeller making a very detailed model may choose to use a scale dummy coupler in place of a Kadee on the front of the locomotive. 

 

Finally some one who understands the question, so it's primarily there for function so I guess cutting them off isn't a good idea then.......lol

The uncoupling trip pin is required to open magnetic couplers using magnets in or under the track.  It is possible to uncouple Kadee couplers without using magnets - a twist of a bamboo skewer inserted into a knuckle is a well-known technique.  Kadee even offers a similar manual uncoupler.

If you use the skewer or similar technique for all uncoupling, the trip pins are no longer required and can be cut off just below the coupler head.  More realistic looking air hoses can be installed for the ultimate in detailing.  Before you go down this road, consider carefully reaches into spots to uncouple with skewers that might be a little too far or too difficult or might knock some carefully detailed scenery.  Also, passenger car diaphrams will interfere with skewer uncoupling.

Most mr's end up with a combination of skewer uncoupling with magnetic uncoupling reserved for the more difficult to reach places.  Which means the trip pins have to be left on unless the layout was planned for all manual uncoupling.

my thoughts, your choices

Fred W

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Posted by Allegheny2-6-6-6 on Thursday, July 9, 2009 8:22 AM

wjstix

 

Allegheny2-6-6-6

 I was on the "Details West" website earlier marveling at some of the example of the super detailing kits on various models and noticed that most of them had couplers with no hose or should I say simulated hose connected to it. Is this becasue the MU hoses would be hooked to the first car in the consist?

Kadee and Kadee-clone model couplers have an uncoupling device sticking out under them to simulate a brake hose that would be connected between couplers in a set of cars or between a car and a locomotive. Real couplers don't have hoses that stick out like that when they're not connected to anything...so a modeller making a very detailed model may choose to use a scale dummy coupler in place of a Kadee on the front of the locomotive. 

 

Finally some one who understands the question, so it's primarily there for function so I guess cutting them off isn't a good idea then.......lol

Just my 2 cents worth, I spent the rest on trains. If you choked a Smurf what color would he turn?
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Posted by wjstix on Thursday, July 9, 2009 12:43 AM

 

Allegheny2-6-6-6

 I was on the "Details West" website earlier marveling at some of the example of the super detailing kits on various models and noticed that most of them had couplers with no hose or should I say simulated hose connected to it. Is this becasue the MU hoses would be hooked to the first car in the consist?

Kadee and Kadee-clone model couplers have an uncoupling device sticking out under them to simulate a brake hose that would be connected between couplers in a set of cars or between a car and a locomotive. Real couplers don't have hoses that stick out like that when they're not connected to anything...so a modeller making a very detailed model may choose to use a scale dummy coupler in place of a Kadee on the front of the locomotive. 

Stix
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Posted by WSOR 3801 on Thursday, July 9, 2009 12:28 AM

 Maybe this photo will help.

The trainline hose is the one directly under the coupler.  This hose runs from the lead engine, through the power consist, and through all the cars.  The other three hoses closer to the camera are the MU hoses.  These allow for the extra features of the engine braking system.  

One of the hoses works the independent brakes thoughout the consist.  When applying the brakes in the train, the engines will also set up.  Another hose is hooked up to the independent brake valve to release the brakes on the consist only (Bailing off).  The rest of the train will still set up.  The third hose hooks together the main air reservoirs. 

The orange cable hanging down is the 27 pin MU cable.  This relays the electrical commands from the lead engine to the rest of the consist (direction, power/braking, headlight control, fault detection, etc.).  

Mike WSOR engineer | HO scale since 1988 | Visit our club www.WCGandyDancers.com

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Posted by markpierce on Wednesday, July 8, 2009 11:16 PM

MU "hoses" are connected between locomotives to permit train/locomotive control from the cab of one locomotive unit.  A locomotive's brake hose is connected to the adjacent car to control braking on the remainder of the train..

Mark

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Brake Hoses on locomotives?
Posted by Allegheny2-6-6-6 on Wednesday, July 8, 2009 10:57 PM

 I was on the "Details West" website earlier marveling at some of the example of the super detailing kits on various models and noticed that most of them had couplers with no hose or should I say simulated hose connected to it. Is this becasue the MU hoses would be hooked to the first car in the consist?

Just my 2 cents worth, I spent the rest on trains. If you choked a Smurf what color would he turn?

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