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CAD Model RR Planning

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CAD Model RR Planning
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 9:46 PM
Poll: If you used a CAD computer program to design a layout, which one was it? Perhaps CAD RAIL, or 3rd Planet... Let me know which one you used! Thanks.
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CAD Model RR Planning
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 13, 2003 9:46 PM
Poll: If you used a CAD computer program to design a layout, which one was it? Perhaps CAD RAIL, or 3rd Planet... Let me know which one you used! Thanks.
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 14, 2003 4:40 PM
I use AUTODESK 2000 BUT HAD TO DESIGN MY OWN COMPONENTS.
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 14, 2003 4:40 PM
I use AUTODESK 2000 BUT HAD TO DESIGN MY OWN COMPONENTS.
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Posted by vsmith on Thursday, August 14, 2003 4:41 PM
Same here, Autocadd 2000i, same thing with components (track, switches, etc.).

   Have fun with your trains

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Posted by vsmith on Thursday, August 14, 2003 4:41 PM
Same here, Autocadd 2000i, same thing with components (track, switches, etc.).

   Have fun with your trains

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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 14, 2003 5:02 PM
TurboCad 3.0, have to design own components
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 14, 2003 5:02 PM
TurboCad 3.0, have to design own components
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 14, 2003 5:49 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Chessie7

Poll: If you used a CAD computer program to design a layout, which one was it? Perhaps CAD RAIL, or 3rd Planet... Let me know which one you used! Thanks.
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 14, 2003 5:49 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Chessie7

Poll: If you used a CAD computer program to design a layout, which one was it? Perhaps CAD RAIL, or 3rd Planet... Let me know which one you used! Thanks.
  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 14, 2003 5:52 PM
I used AutoCADLT 2002. I have a large plotter and was able to print "bedsheets" full size. Watch out, though. Have one of each major special component (turnout, crossing, etc) so you don't start curves and transitions too suddenly.
QUOTE: Originally posted by Chessie7

Poll: If you used a CAD computer program to design a layout, which one was it? Perhaps CAD RAIL, or 3rd Planet... Let me know which one you used! Thanks.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 14, 2003 5:52 PM
I used AutoCADLT 2002. I have a large plotter and was able to print "bedsheets" full size. Watch out, though. Have one of each major special component (turnout, crossing, etc) so you don't start curves and transitions too suddenly.
QUOTE: Originally posted by Chessie7

Poll: If you used a CAD computer program to design a layout, which one was it? Perhaps CAD RAIL, or 3rd Planet... Let me know which one you used! Thanks.
  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 15, 2003 1:19 PM
Thanks! Where did you get AUTODESK? Pardon my lack of computer knowledge, but what do you mean that you "had to design my own componets"?
QUOTE: Originally posted by burt olinger

I use AUTODESK 2000 BUT HAD TO DESIGN MY OWN COMPONENTS.
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 15, 2003 1:19 PM
Thanks! Where did you get AUTODESK? Pardon my lack of computer knowledge, but what do you mean that you "had to design my own componets"?
QUOTE: Originally posted by burt olinger

I use AUTODESK 2000 BUT HAD TO DESIGN MY OWN COMPONENTS.
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 15, 2003 1:24 PM
Thanks! Where did you get Autocadd 2000, and pardon my lack of computer knowledge, but what do you mean by " had to design you track/switch components?
QUOTE: Originally posted by vsmith

Same here, Autocadd 2000i, same thing with components (track, switches, etc.).
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 15, 2003 1:24 PM
Thanks! Where did you get Autocadd 2000, and pardon my lack of computer knowledge, but what do you mean by " had to design you track/switch components?
QUOTE: Originally posted by vsmith

Same here, Autocadd 2000i, same thing with components (track, switches, etc.).
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 15, 2003 1:26 PM
Thanks! Where did you get TuboCad 3.0? Pardon my lack of computer knowledge, but do you mean by you had to design you own components?
QUOTE: Originally posted by gchenier

TurboCad 3.0, have to design own components
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 15, 2003 1:26 PM
Thanks! Where did you get TuboCad 3.0? Pardon my lack of computer knowledge, but do you mean by you had to design you own components?
QUOTE: Originally posted by gchenier

TurboCad 3.0, have to design own components
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 15, 2003 1:31 PM
Originally posted by Chessie7

Thanks! Where did you get AUTODESK? Pardon my lack of computer knowledge, but what do you mean that you "had to design my own componets"?
[i]

You need to measure turnout frog angles and lengths if not already known, then create the pattern for your CAD to use. Not a big deal, but no built-in 'library' of track sections etc until you build your own CAD models of them. Gives the freedom of cutting rail to exact length required for any configuration.

Having used CAD which allows virtual tracklaying to see what will fit and what won't; and being able to try different arrangements to MAKE something fit, makes one appreciate the effort that must have gone into trackplanning in pre-computer times. Sometimes i really hate this silly machine, but wouln't be without it!
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 15, 2003 1:31 PM
Originally posted by Chessie7

Thanks! Where did you get AUTODESK? Pardon my lack of computer knowledge, but what do you mean that you "had to design my own componets"?
[i]

You need to measure turnout frog angles and lengths if not already known, then create the pattern for your CAD to use. Not a big deal, but no built-in 'library' of track sections etc until you build your own CAD models of them. Gives the freedom of cutting rail to exact length required for any configuration.

Having used CAD which allows virtual tracklaying to see what will fit and what won't; and being able to try different arrangements to MAKE something fit, makes one appreciate the effort that must have gone into trackplanning in pre-computer times. Sometimes i really hate this silly machine, but wouln't be without it!
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Posted by jwfoise on Monday, August 18, 2003 5:00 PM
RR Track
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Posted by jwfoise on Monday, August 18, 2003 5:00 PM
RR Track
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 4:22 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by gchenier

You need to measure turnout frog angles and lengths if not already known, then create the pattern for your CAD to use. Not a big deal, but no built-in 'library' of track sections etc until you build your own CAD models of them. Gives the freedom of cutting rail to exact length required for any configuration.



I am very proficient at AutoCAD 2000 and many times I have started designing my layout on it. I have run into the same problem though: the components. I would think that with all the people using AutoCAD for their layouts, there would be components prebuilt on the web somewhere for download.

Otherwise, my problem is, where can I find the measurements for the components? Do I just need to get one and then measure it all out?

Also, if you want to share your templates, maybe I can offer something in return...

Thanks,
Ken
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 4:22 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by gchenier

You need to measure turnout frog angles and lengths if not already known, then create the pattern for your CAD to use. Not a big deal, but no built-in 'library' of track sections etc until you build your own CAD models of them. Gives the freedom of cutting rail to exact length required for any configuration.



I am very proficient at AutoCAD 2000 and many times I have started designing my layout on it. I have run into the same problem though: the components. I would think that with all the people using AutoCAD for their layouts, there would be components prebuilt on the web somewhere for download.

Otherwise, my problem is, where can I find the measurements for the components? Do I just need to get one and then measure it all out?

Also, if you want to share your templates, maybe I can offer something in return...

Thanks,
Ken
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    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 4:33 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by ken_heaps
I am very proficient at AutoCAD 2000 and many times I have started designing my layout on it. I have run into the same problem though: the components. I would think that with all the people using AutoCAD for their layouts, there would be components prebuilt on the web somewhere for download.

Otherwise, my problem is, where can I find the measurements for the components? Do I just need to get one and then measure it all out?

Also, if you want to share your templates, maybe I can offer something in return...

Thanks,
Ken



Yes; if the mfg doesn't provide the data, get the component(s) and measure and try. Print a 1:1 scale of your CAD model and lay the component on it to check your accuracy. I find that using a very thin centerline to represent the track works better than a thick line or line pair to represent the rails.

Another nice CAD feature is the ability to print 1:1 scale on several sheets. Cut the sheets to slightly less than their boundaries and tape in place on your layout in the corners of the sheets, measure with a rule to ensure any printer error is 'fixed' by the small separation between the edges of the sheets. Then slip a piece of carbon paper, or tracing paper from a fabric shop, between the paper and the wood through the gaps between individual sheets, and using a pointed instrument trace the pattern onto your layout.
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 4:33 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by ken_heaps
I am very proficient at AutoCAD 2000 and many times I have started designing my layout on it. I have run into the same problem though: the components. I would think that with all the people using AutoCAD for their layouts, there would be components prebuilt on the web somewhere for download.

Otherwise, my problem is, where can I find the measurements for the components? Do I just need to get one and then measure it all out?

Also, if you want to share your templates, maybe I can offer something in return...

Thanks,
Ken



Yes; if the mfg doesn't provide the data, get the component(s) and measure and try. Print a 1:1 scale of your CAD model and lay the component on it to check your accuracy. I find that using a very thin centerline to represent the track works better than a thick line or line pair to represent the rails.

Another nice CAD feature is the ability to print 1:1 scale on several sheets. Cut the sheets to slightly less than their boundaries and tape in place on your layout in the corners of the sheets, measure with a rule to ensure any printer error is 'fixed' by the small separation between the edges of the sheets. Then slip a piece of carbon paper, or tracing paper from a fabric shop, between the paper and the wood through the gaps between individual sheets, and using a pointed instrument trace the pattern onto your layout.
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Posted by preceng on Thursday, August 21, 2003 10:00 PM
Use AutoCAD 2004. Great if you know how to use. You need to draw every line by hand (so to speak). UPSIDE: The accuracy is outstanding. I use it to design track layouts, wiring schematics (great reference when something breaks), my control panel layout, etc. I use it to design kit-bashed and built from scratch structures. The DOWNSIDE: $3500.00

I have not used other software.

For those who use AutoCADD, and Bachman EZ Track (HO Scale). I have all track components as AutoCAD 2000 blocks.

ALSO:
Benchwork (table) designs for 4'x8' w/ 2'x3' wing. My current track layout w/ control panel schematics. Atlas swiches, and More.

If you ask, I will supply

Good Luck
Allan B.
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Posted by preceng on Thursday, August 21, 2003 10:00 PM
Use AutoCAD 2004. Great if you know how to use. You need to draw every line by hand (so to speak). UPSIDE: The accuracy is outstanding. I use it to design track layouts, wiring schematics (great reference when something breaks), my control panel layout, etc. I use it to design kit-bashed and built from scratch structures. The DOWNSIDE: $3500.00

I have not used other software.

For those who use AutoCADD, and Bachman EZ Track (HO Scale). I have all track components as AutoCAD 2000 blocks.

ALSO:
Benchwork (table) designs for 4'x8' w/ 2'x3' wing. My current track layout w/ control panel schematics. Atlas swiches, and More.

If you ask, I will supply

Good Luck
Allan B.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 21, 2003 10:49 PM
I HIGHLY reccomend Autodesk Quick CAD 8.0
You can buy it online via Amozon for $37 and it is a very full featured CAD program that should do all you need without going to a full blown AutoCAD package.

I started (and finished REV 1) of the layout I am currently building using the Atlas right track software. That was good - but was hard to put in the "things" around the basement (furnace, wall studs, etc) that really helped in the benchwork phase.

A CAD package allows you to use "layers" that you can turn "on" and "off" so you can see only the benchwork, or the trackwork, etc. that you want to at that time (GREAT for keeping benchwork away from future turnout motors).

I was lucky in that my modeling buddy had already created the elements for #5 and #6 turnouts and gave them to me. We hand-lay our track, so these may not match commercial turnouts exactly. I have also created an element for the Walther's turntable and roundhouse. I'm happy to share - Contact me at rwichmann@voyager.net if needed - HO scale.

Quick CAD 8 comes with a great "CAD for Dummies" type lesson book to get you going quickly if you have never used a CAD package before.

Note that you can't get the "virtual view" of the layout like in the layout design packages, but that didn't interest me, personally. Also QC-8 is a 2D package, so you have to figure your elevation changes manually.

-Bryan
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 21, 2003 10:49 PM
I HIGHLY reccomend Autodesk Quick CAD 8.0
You can buy it online via Amozon for $37 and it is a very full featured CAD program that should do all you need without going to a full blown AutoCAD package.

I started (and finished REV 1) of the layout I am currently building using the Atlas right track software. That was good - but was hard to put in the "things" around the basement (furnace, wall studs, etc) that really helped in the benchwork phase.

A CAD package allows you to use "layers" that you can turn "on" and "off" so you can see only the benchwork, or the trackwork, etc. that you want to at that time (GREAT for keeping benchwork away from future turnout motors).

I was lucky in that my modeling buddy had already created the elements for #5 and #6 turnouts and gave them to me. We hand-lay our track, so these may not match commercial turnouts exactly. I have also created an element for the Walther's turntable and roundhouse. I'm happy to share - Contact me at rwichmann@voyager.net if needed - HO scale.

Quick CAD 8 comes with a great "CAD for Dummies" type lesson book to get you going quickly if you have never used a CAD package before.

Note that you can't get the "virtual view" of the layout like in the layout design packages, but that didn't interest me, personally. Also QC-8 is a 2D package, so you have to figure your elevation changes manually.

-Bryan

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