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Track to wall offset for planning (HO Scale)

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  • Member since
    April 2003
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Track to wall offset for planning (HO Scale)
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, July 19, 2003 3:21 PM
I have a question regarding backdrops and benchwork. I am planning my around the walls layout for a 21' x 18' space. Along one wall the layout will be double decker. How far off the wall should the nearest track be if this area will be used for a classification yard and decorated with a backdrop of a city scene? I figure the benchwork will be approximately four and one-half inches thick, the backdrop will be a quarter to a half inch and the nearest track would be two inches from there. This gives me something like seven to eight inches. I was figuring on using ten inches for planning purposes. Is this a bit high? also, on the other portions where backdrops will be used but not double decked, I figure I can expect to get the nearest track four or five inches from the wall if I need to. Do these numbers sound right to y'all?

Thanks for your help. Ed
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Track to wall offset for planning (HO Scale)
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, July 19, 2003 3:21 PM
I have a question regarding backdrops and benchwork. I am planning my around the walls layout for a 21' x 18' space. Along one wall the layout will be double decker. How far off the wall should the nearest track be if this area will be used for a classification yard and decorated with a backdrop of a city scene? I figure the benchwork will be approximately four and one-half inches thick, the backdrop will be a quarter to a half inch and the nearest track would be two inches from there. This gives me something like seven to eight inches. I was figuring on using ten inches for planning purposes. Is this a bit high? also, on the other portions where backdrops will be used but not double decked, I figure I can expect to get the nearest track four or five inches from the wall if I need to. Do these numbers sound right to y'all?

Thanks for your help. Ed
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Clarion PA
  • 38 posts
Posted by RichS1 on Saturday, July 19, 2003 7:29 PM
I have my track on the top level as close to the front edge as I could get. My top level is about 55" to 60" high. I have 6 tracks in the space to class. my cars (HO) I used 3/4" plywood with homosote glued on top. I support the whole level with shelf brackets that you can buy at any hardware store. I mounted the brackets every 16". Which is where the studs are in the wall. It turned out pretty good. Although, some of my operators cannot reach the rear track because they are too short. If I had to it over again (and I still might do it) I may lower it down a tad......
"Rich"
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Clarion PA
  • 38 posts
Posted by RichS1 on Saturday, July 19, 2003 7:29 PM
I have my track on the top level as close to the front edge as I could get. My top level is about 55" to 60" high. I have 6 tracks in the space to class. my cars (HO) I used 3/4" plywood with homosote glued on top. I support the whole level with shelf brackets that you can buy at any hardware store. I mounted the brackets every 16". Which is where the studs are in the wall. It turned out pretty good. Although, some of my operators cannot reach the rear track because they are too short. If I had to it over again (and I still might do it) I may lower it down a tad......
"Rich"
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, July 19, 2003 8:47 PM
My plan is to have the upper level at 72 inches from the floor and he lower level something arounf 44 to 48 inches. I anticipate having eight classification tracks and two additional tracks to emulate he main line running by the yard so the classification area will be about ten tracks wide. If the first track is eight inches from the wall, then the upper deck has to be about 30 inches wide minimum measured from the wall. Then I have to create a step up for operators which is no big deal but I want to make sure I have the numbers right. What does you experience tell you about the ten inch figure for planning? Am I being realistic or too generous?
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, July 19, 2003 8:47 PM
My plan is to have the upper level at 72 inches from the floor and he lower level something arounf 44 to 48 inches. I anticipate having eight classification tracks and two additional tracks to emulate he main line running by the yard so the classification area will be about ten tracks wide. If the first track is eight inches from the wall, then the upper deck has to be about 30 inches wide minimum measured from the wall. Then I have to create a step up for operators which is no big deal but I want to make sure I have the numbers right. What does you experience tell you about the ten inch figure for planning? Am I being realistic or too generous?
  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: Guelph, Ont.
  • 1,476 posts
Posted by BR60103 on Saturday, July 19, 2003 11:32 PM
If you can do it, go for it.
my rear track is 2"-3" from the wall and there is just room for the backdrop. A few layers of backdrop and some 3d scenery in front of it will look best.
When you have a yard, try to have as little sticking up at the front as possible, as it will get knocked when you reach in to do something.
What is the "benchwork" that is 4 1/2 inches thick? a vertical 2x4? can you put at least part of the backdrop right on the wall? make some taller structures to hide the benchwork and then some railroady stuff to separate the city from the tracks.

--David

  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: Guelph, Ont.
  • 1,476 posts
Posted by BR60103 on Saturday, July 19, 2003 11:32 PM
If you can do it, go for it.
my rear track is 2"-3" from the wall and there is just room for the backdrop. A few layers of backdrop and some 3d scenery in front of it will look best.
When you have a yard, try to have as little sticking up at the front as possible, as it will get knocked when you reach in to do something.
What is the "benchwork" that is 4 1/2 inches thick? a vertical 2x4? can you put at least part of the backdrop right on the wall? make some taller structures to hide the benchwork and then some railroady stuff to separate the city from the tracks.

--David

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, July 20, 2003 8:29 AM
Well, the 4 and one-half inch thickness comes from the benchwork supporting the upper layer. A 2x4 will be used for the main member and diagonal bracing of 1x4 will also be used. So combining these I get 3.50 in. + 0.75 in. = 4.25 in. with a quarter inch gap to the existing drywall. Now it is certainly possible that I could do something that would reduce this thickness above the upper layer, but I cant reduce it behind the lower layer. I don't want to put the backdrop right against the wall because this is a finished room and I don't want to do anything that would compromise that. I don't think that would survive Right-of-Way negotiations, if you get my meaning. Thanks - Ed
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, July 20, 2003 8:29 AM
Well, the 4 and one-half inch thickness comes from the benchwork supporting the upper layer. A 2x4 will be used for the main member and diagonal bracing of 1x4 will also be used. So combining these I get 3.50 in. + 0.75 in. = 4.25 in. with a quarter inch gap to the existing drywall. Now it is certainly possible that I could do something that would reduce this thickness above the upper layer, but I cant reduce it behind the lower layer. I don't want to put the backdrop right against the wall because this is a finished room and I don't want to do anything that would compromise that. I don't think that would survive Right-of-Way negotiations, if you get my meaning. Thanks - Ed
  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: Guelph, Ont.
  • 1,476 posts
Posted by BR60103 on Sunday, July 20, 2003 8:57 PM
Sorry, I didn't mean actually on the wall, but at the level of the back of the 2x4, if you have a big open rectangle there. You would have about 3" of space to put in various levels of backdrops. You would still have to cover the front of the 2x4 with some sort of large structure, but that's where your artistic talents come in. Then assorted buts of railroady stuff on the flat surface, or possibly a street.
I picture a dirty grey sky with some downtown skyscrapers in front of it (not much detail), then some seedier low rises in front of that.

--David

  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: Guelph, Ont.
  • 1,476 posts
Posted by BR60103 on Sunday, July 20, 2003 8:57 PM
Sorry, I didn't mean actually on the wall, but at the level of the back of the 2x4, if you have a big open rectangle there. You would have about 3" of space to put in various levels of backdrops. You would still have to cover the front of the 2x4 with some sort of large structure, but that's where your artistic talents come in. Then assorted buts of railroady stuff on the flat surface, or possibly a street.
I picture a dirty grey sky with some downtown skyscrapers in front of it (not much detail), then some seedier low rises in front of that.

--David

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, July 20, 2003 9:11 PM
David,

I had to read your last post twice to get the picture, but I agree I could recess the backdrop to create a 3D backdrop and improve the appearence. But because of the thickness of the 2x4, I still have to put the track in the same place away from the wall. Thanks for the idea of recessing the backdrop. I'll have to look at it on paper. - Ed
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,278 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, July 20, 2003 9:11 PM
David,

I had to read your last post twice to get the picture, but I agree I could recess the backdrop to create a 3D backdrop and improve the appearence. But because of the thickness of the 2x4, I still have to put the track in the same place away from the wall. Thanks for the idea of recessing the backdrop. I'll have to look at it on paper. - Ed

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