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Converting a MR track plan into a software

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  • Member since
    November 2019
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Converting a MR track plan into a software
Posted by JamesKY on Monday, November 4, 2019 2:29 PM

Hi

Has anyone succesfully managed to port the Inyo & White Mtn RR track plan from MRM into a software package? I am having difficulties with the turnouts. I am especially having issues trying to model the passthrough / storage area towards the bottom of the track plan.

I am pretty much set on using Atlas code 83 track as I have previously invested in it.

Any tips would be greatly appreciated

Thanks

James

Modelling USA RR in Europe

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Posted by cuyama on Monday, November 4, 2019 5:13 PM

Welcome to the forum. Your first few posts are moderated and so may be delayed. But that passes quickly.

JamesKY
Has anyone succesfully managed to port the Inyo & White Mtn RR track plan from MRM into a software package? I am having difficulties with the turnouts. I am especially having issues trying to model the passthrough / storage area towards the bottom of the track plan. I am pretty much set on using Atlas code 83 track as I have previously invested in it.

If you are trying to use sectional curves and straights, it may not be possible. The original was built with flextrack and curves as tight as 18" radius. There are also curved, double-slip, and three-way turnouts used that don’t have exact equivalents in the Atlas Code 83 line.

Note also that the entire layout was designed to roll away from the wall for access – otherwise it’s too deep for access (unless you have enough space for aisles all around).

Once you consider space for aisles and access, many different track arrangements would fit.

Good luck with your layout.

Byron

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Posted by JamesKY on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 3:29 PM

Thanks Byron for confirming my hunch.

i have the space and was planning on using a mix of flex and set track. Looks like I may need to look into some Peco #5 turnouts.

thanks again

James

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Posted by Motley on Thursday, November 7, 2019 7:51 PM

Man that is a really cool trackplan. Looking forward to seeing your new layout with the Mountain railroad.

I have a 9x12 space that will connect to the main room layout (still laying track there) for the steel mill. And I can't even come close to all those things included in that mountain trackplan. Maybe I need to redesign that plan.

Michael


Director -
Mile-HI-Railroad
Prototype: D&RGW Moffat, UP, GN. BNSF 

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Posted by wvg_ca on Thursday, November 7, 2019 8:00 PM

unless you have some idea of what software was used the create the layout, and more more importantly the brand and gauge of the track and turnouts used [the first time] you won't be able to recreate it exactly, best you can hope for is close ...

a lot of the magazine layouts aren't done using layout software, rather they use design software specific to the magazine ..

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Posted by TxPitmaster on Friday, November 8, 2019 7:50 AM

I use scarm software.  About the only way to get a plan transfered that I found was a take a JPG and use it as the background and adjust it with trial and error till it fits the area your going to use then use flex or segments and come as close as possible to match your background picture in scarm.

TxPitmaster

Cognitive Thought & Opposable Thumb RR

NE Texas

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Posted by rrinker on Friday, November 8, 2019 1:50 PM

 MR definitely does not use track planning software. They said a while back what they use, a general graphics program for Macs. Adobe Illustrator is what a staffer said in a thread about this a while back.

                         --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by mobilman44 on Friday, November 8, 2019 2:08 PM

My question is "why".   The track plan is self explanatory and putting it onto another platform seems a waste of time and energy.  Maybe I'm missing something here, but I just don't think so............

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

Living in southeast Texas, modeling the "postwar" Santa Fe and Illinois Central 

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Posted by JamesKY on Sunday, November 10, 2019 12:38 AM

Thanks everyone for your feedback.

to answer the "why", I was expecting to be able to print out at 100% to help with laying the track.

does anyone know if I can take the layout from the MR site and print at 100%, would that work?

 

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Posted by cuyama on Wednesday, November 13, 2019 7:56 PM

JamesKY
does anyone know if I can take the layout from the MR site and print at 100%, would that work?

Probably not, for a couple of reasons. The first is that the resolution of the .pdf is likely not high enough. When enlarged to 1:1 dimensions, the details probably won’t be fine enough to help much with track–laying. The second is that (I think) you are using a different manufacturer’s components, so it won’t fit exactly. The third is that the published track plan was created in drawing software (Illustrator), not CAD. So it may not even match the components the original builder used exactly, especially if the builder provided the Kalmbach artists with a hand-drawn plan to begin with (as happens sometimes).

In earlier days, folks used the grid printed on the track plan and a corresponding grid drawn on the floor or benchwork to manually determine track locations relative to the grid. That might be a way to approach it -- but it still may not be perfect and you'll need to make adjustments.

Good luck with your layout.

Byron

 

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