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Stone Arch Viaduct / Bridge

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Stone Arch Viaduct / Bridge
Posted by railandsail on Thursday, August 29, 2019 10:05 AM

Stone Arch Viaduct / Bridge

I've included both names as I have seen folks address them with either name. I think what I am trying to create is principally a viaduct, but yesterday I inserted a bridge in a portion of it. I did it in a straight track portion, so I could alternately allow for it to be included in the final trackwork, or perhaps not.

The bottom deck of my layout is to represent principally the city Baltimore, home of America's start with the railroad industry. There is a neat stone arch bridge there in the suburbs, the Thomas viaduct that is even more famous as I read more about it. I wanted to include such a viaduct on my layout as a landmark representative of Baltimore.

I recently became aware that I had several photos I had posted of this viaduct that were not actually the Thomas viaduct, even thought they look very similar. One was a double track affair, the Thomas one, and one was a single track affair located in another state. I'll get into that later.

Turns out I have need of both a single track portion and a double track portion. How to construct them is another big question mark for me. I am making a mock-up using foamcore board right now, and it is presenting even more challenges than I originally anticipated.

Thomas Viaduct

from  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Viaduct

The Thomas Viaduct spans the Patapsco River and Patapsco Valley between Relay, Maryland and Elkridge, Maryland, USA. It was commissioned by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O); built between July 4, 1833, and July 4, 1835; and named for Philip E. Thomas, the company's first president.[3]

At its completion, the Thomas Viaduct was the largest railroad bridge in the United States[4] and the country's first multi-span masonry railroad bridge to be built on a curve. It remains the world's oldest multiple arched stone railroad bridge.[5] In 1964, it was designated as a National Historic Landmark.

 

Interestingly, it was commisioned and built so early on by B&O's first president,...and its still in use TODAY !!

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Posted by cowman on Thursday, August 29, 2019 5:37 PM

I think I  would use extruded foam.  I  have seen stone piers made from it, that were scribed to look like stone.  The foam is easy to cut and form, also strong enough to hold trains.  Hot wire/knife make smoother cuts, carving and and sanding make a mess, but don't create noxious fumes.

Good luck,

Richard

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, August 29, 2019 5:51 PM

Marklin of Sweden has a good video on creating a modern stone bridge.  No reason why you could not use his foam techniques to create the Thomas Viaduct

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by BATMAN on Thursday, August 29, 2019 5:59 PM

I was following a guy that built a massive viaduct out of extruded foam, it looked really good. The pier on the right is one I made out of extruded foam while watching the hockey game.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by "JaBear" on Friday, August 30, 2019 5:04 AM
Once upon a time, when I had time, I built this viaduct using 4” x 2” pine covered with 1/8” MDF, and card. I was lucky enough to have a fellow model railroader with a commercial laser engraver do the top brick work for me. I did the stone work with a dentist’s drill bit and a Dremel type hand tool.
 
Stone viaduct by Bear, on Flickr
 
It may be more robust than you need but then it is part of a modular exhibition layout.
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by hon30critter on Saturday, August 31, 2019 3:19 AM

JaBear!

That is a great piece of modelling! The accuracy of the joint lines is amazing!

I have to build some stone piers for the club because the commercial offerings aren't tall enough. I don't think that my hands are steady enough to carve the joints myself so I'm hoping I can find some suitable molded styrene sheets. If it looks half as good as yours I will be happy.

Cheers!!

Dave

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Posted by "JaBear" on Saturday, August 31, 2019 5:14 AM
Thanks Dave. I drew the lines with pencil before I started “carving” but if you click on the photo to enlarge it, you’ll see that my hand was not that steady at all!! Which actually aided me in obtaining that slightly irregular quarried stone look, I was trying to achieve.LaughLaugh
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by freeway3 on Saturday, August 31, 2019 12:00 PM

I grew up not far fron the Thomas Viaduct, and used it as a basis for my model.  My (previous) model RR is long gone, but my abandoned blog lives on:

viaduct1

viaduct2

...and a couple of under construction shots:

viaduct3

viaduct4

I made hydrocal castings from silicone molds, using CAD modeled & 3D printed (SLA) masters.  More (and larger) photos and a complete how-to on my blog (the how to posting is on the second page, dated Jan 13 2013):

http://basrr.blogspot.com/

 

 

Ed

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Posted by railandsail on Saturday, August 31, 2019 12:10 PM

BigDaddy

Marklin of Sweden has a good video on creating a modern stone bridge.  No reason why you could not use his foam techniques to create the Thomas Viaduct

I've reviewed that and there is just too much custom carving work involved.

 

 

 

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Posted by railandsail on Saturday, August 31, 2019 12:24 PM

freeway3

I grew up not far fron the Thomas Viaduct, and used it as a basis for my model.  My (previous) model RR is long gone, but my abandoned blog lives on:

viaduct1

viaduct2

...and a couple of under construction shots:

viaduct3

viaduct4

I made hydrocal castings from silicone molds, using CAD modeled & 3D printed (SLA) masters.  More (and larger) photos and a complete how-to on my blog (the how to posting is on the second page, dated Jan 13 2013):

http://basrr.blogspot.com/

 

 

 

Very nice looking job, but I could not find the 'complete how to'  ?

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, August 31, 2019 2:17 PM

railandsail
How to construct them is another big question mark for me.

.

The best viaducts I have seen were made by piecing O scale tunnel portals side by side for the length needed.

.

railandsail
Interestingly, it was commisioned and built so early on by B&O's first president,...and its still in use TODAY !!

.

Not surprising at all. There are ancient stone viaducts many times older than that one is use, or still standing, all around Europe.

.

A stone viaduct will last thousands of years. It is more work to remove one than it is worth. Many will probably remain for many lifetimes.

.

JaBear
Once upon a time, when I had time, I built this viaduct using 4” x 2” pine covered with 1/8” MDF, and card.

.

Holy Cats! Bear... that is amazing. I don't know if you have shared pictures of that before, but I love seeing it now.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Saturday, August 31, 2019 4:56 PM

freeway3

I grew up not far fron the Thomas Viaduct, and used it as a basis for my model.  My (previous) model RR is long gone, but my abandoned blog lives on:

viaduct1

viaduct2

...and a couple of under construction shots:

viaduct3

viaduct4

I made hydrocal castings from silicone molds, using CAD modeled & 3D printed (SLA) masters.  More (and larger) photos and a complete how-to on my blog (the how to posting is on the second page, dated Jan 13 2013):

http://basrr.blogspot.com/

Hey Ed-

Two things:

First, nice layout. You should post more often. And second, I just noticed your avatar: The Ruthless Toothless Broad Street Bully. They don't make 'em like that anymore.

Robert 

LINK to SNSR Blog


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Posted by garya on Saturday, August 31, 2019 5:11 PM

BATMAN

I was following a guy that built a massive viaduct out of extruded foam, it looked really good. The pier on the right is one I made out of extruded foam while watching the hockey game.

 

Gary

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Posted by BATMAN on Saturday, August 31, 2019 5:40 PM

garya

 

 
BATMAN

I was following a guy that built a massive viaduct out of extruded foam, it looked really good. The pier on the right is one I made out of extruded foam while watching the hockey game.

 

 

 

 

I am going through serious withdrawal and that doesn't help!Laugh Only a month to go.Pirate 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by garya on Saturday, August 31, 2019 6:54 PM

BATMAN
I am going through serious withdrawal and that doesn't help!Laugh Only a month to go.Pirate 
 

Gary

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, August 31, 2019 10:47 PM

ROBERT PETRICK
Hey Ed- nice layout. You should post more often.

.

Let me second that.

.

I would love to see you share some pictures of that gorgeous layout in the Show Me Something thread.

.

Please share more.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by railandsail on Sunday, September 1, 2019 6:05 AM

freeway3

I made hydrocal castings from silicone molds, using CAD modeled & 3D printed (SLA) masters.  More (and larger) photos and a complete how-to on my blog (the how to posting is on the second page, dated Jan 13 2013):

http://basrr.blogspot.com/

 

 

I could not find that 'complete how to' ?

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Posted by railandsail on Sunday, September 1, 2019 6:10 AM

Flexible Stone Walls

It was just recently suggested,....

Check out some of the products by Chooch Enterprises. I think that they might be of use to you.

https://www.choochenterprises.com/HOwalls.html

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Posted by freeway3 on Sunday, September 1, 2019 5:23 PM

Thanks Robert and Kevin for the kind words.  The only pictures I have of the defunt layout are on my old blog, so nothing new to post.  I guess I could look for suitable ones for "Show Me Something".

In the benchwork stages now on a smaller HOn3 layout, so I'm sure I'll become more active as I move along with this one. This forum has been a great resource for me, I do try to give back when I can.

ROBERT PETRICK
The Ruthless Toothless Broad Street Bully. They don't make 'em like that anymore.

One of my hockey heros from my teens! I also can't wait... preseason begins Sept. 15!

 

Ed

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Monday, September 2, 2019 10:19 AM

freeway3

Thanks Robert and Kevin for the kind words.  The only pictures I have of the defunt layout are on my old blog, so nothing new to post.  I guess I could look for suitable ones for "Show Me Something".

In the benchwork stages now on a smaller HOn3 layout, so I'm sure I'll become more active as I move along with this one. This forum has been a great resource for me, I do try to give back when I can.

ROBERT PETRICK
The Ruthless Toothless Broad Street Bully. They don't make 'em like that anymore.

One of my hockey heros from my teens! I also can't wait... preseason begins Sept. 15!

In those days I was more of a Howe/Hull/Esposito fan . . . Jesus saves! and Espo scores on the rebound. Then that scrawny kid from Brantford showed up, and it was like "Gordie who . . . ?"

Post photos of your new layout. Start a build thread. Photos of raw benchwork under construction and in progress count.

Robert 

LINK to SNSR Blog


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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, September 2, 2019 1:47 PM

If you are thinking of building this up from castings, consider Bragdon foam.  The castings are light, unlike most casting material, and can easily be cut with scissors.  Using the foam material and their high quality molds will produce superior rock walls and faces.

www.bragdonent.com

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by railandsail on Monday, September 2, 2019 7:04 PM

MisterBeasley

If you are thinking of building this up from castings, consider Bragdon foam.  The castings are light, unlike most casting material, and can easily be cut with scissors.  Using the foam material and their high quality molds will produce superior rock walls and faces.

www.bragdonent.com

 

Thanks for that video and info,...looks very promising !

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Posted by freeway3 on Wednesday, September 4, 2019 8:10 AM

railandsail
I could not find that 'complete how to' ?

http://basrr.blogspot.com/2013/01/mold-making-casting-for-viaduct.html

I thought it was easy enough to find..

It is a "complete" how-to in that it summarizes the steps involved.  It does not teach you CAD modeling, 3D printing, silicone mold making, and plaster casting.

 

Ed

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Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, September 4, 2019 9:10 AM

freeway3

 

http://basrr.blogspot.com/2013/01/mold-making-casting-for-viaduct.html

I thought it was easy enough to find..

It is a "complete" how-to in that it summarizes the steps involved.  It does not teach you CAD modeling, 3D printing, silicone mold making, and plaster casting.

 

 

Sorry Ed I did not find that particular link when I tried it at first.

Question?
I noticed that your one mold for 'half of the arch roof' was curved. Does this present a problem when trying to pour soupy plaster/hydrocal into it?? I thought most molds for casting needed to be relatively flat in order to coat all of their surfaces with a thin coat of plaster/hydrocal?

 

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Posted by railandsail on Thursday, September 5, 2019 9:36 AM

freeway3

Thanks for that link and the photos. i really think that is the way I am going to proceed.

I liked in particular:

a) the manner you included that vertical proud column in with the front facing mold,

b) casting of the curved arch roof

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Posted by freeway3 on Thursday, September 5, 2019 4:46 PM

railandsail
I noticed that your one mold for 'half of the arch roof' was curved. Does this present a problem when trying to pour soupy plaster/hydrocal into it?? I thought most molds for casting needed to be relatively flat in order to coat all of their surfaces with a thin coat of plaster/hydrocal?

You're right, it was a bit of a problem. I had to wait until the plaster was a bit less soupy. I kept troweling it to coax it "up the hill" until completely set.

Of course, that was on the back (unseen) side of the casting. Some did have thin spots, and I broke a few. Just made some more!

 

Ed

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Posted by railandsail on Saturday, September 7, 2019 9:07 AM

Closed Mold?

Please excuse my limited knowledge of 'plaster casting'.

Is it possible to have a 'closed mold' to cast plaster/hydrocal?....say a double sided one into which one would pour the mix?

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Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, September 7, 2019 12:47 PM

railandsail

Closed Mold?

Please excuse my limited knowledge of 'plaster casting'.

Is it possible to have a 'closed mold' to cast plaster/hydrocal?....say a double sided one into which one would pour the mix?

 
Not exactly a closed mould, but there's some info HERE on making simple moulds for casting geometric shapes.
 
Wayne
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Posted by jjdamnit on Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:52 PM

Hello All,

I recall seeing an article about scribing, painting and weathering wood to replicate a stone foundation.

As I remember the brick pattern was drawn on the wood. Then using a razor saw the horizontal morter lines were cut in. The vertical mortar lines were cut in using a small chisel blade in a hobby knife.

The wood was then painted brick red with primer. The mortar lines were highlighted by using drywall compound and rubbing off the excess.

This produced a brick facade and not a cut stone facade.

If a cut stone look is desired you could buy a single sheet of the Chooch product and make a master mold then pour as many sections with hydrocal or plaster of Paris.

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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Posted by freeway3 on Thursday, September 12, 2019 5:22 PM

railandsail
I could not find that 'complete how to' ?

Brian,

I, like you and I suspect many others here, enjoy perusing other modeling forums besides this one. I've noticed your penchant for posing the very same questions on multiple forums. Nothing wrong wth that. Research 'till it hurts, that's evidently your thing.

But imagine my surprise to find MY words, MY photos, and a link to MY blog that I supplied to you here, on another forum. NOT COOL.

My bad - won't happen again. I should have known better, you've been reprimanded here for cross-posting. Several times. Someone in the other forum thread I'm referring to mentioned the cross-posting as well. You ignored that. C'mon, man, grow up. Please respect the property (words, photos) and privacy of others.

Steve O - if I've crossed a line here, my appologies to you.

Ed

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