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Modeling Clamshells

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  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 1,495 posts
Modeling Clamshells
Posted by FRRYKid on Monday, July 29, 2019 3:01 PM

I have decided to reuse another part of my old layout on my new layout. On that section I built a river with provisions for a couple of sandbars. I wanted to put something on them to represent clamshells. I had posted and gotten information to model them using glass delica beads. I had purchased the suggested beads. Unfortunately, from that point to now the beads have gotten lost. (The layout was partially disassembled and I moved the beads to try to keep them safe.) Now I can't find the post with the information in order to replace them. What would be the right size and color of bead for modeling river clam shells?

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • 5,443 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, July 29, 2019 5:33 PM

Quohogs?  Is that prototypical where you live?

In Chesapeake Bay country, I've never seen a clam at low tide.  They would cook in the summer.  They can't be too deep because in the winter, birds drop them on our pier and then eat them after the shell breaks.

In higher latitudes, where tides are more extreme and the temps are cooler, it may be different.

Cherrystones (the definition is a bit regional) are only maybe twice as big as the head of the rail spike.  A very small bead.

Steamers, known as soft shell clams, are about 2" and have a disgusting snout and you shouldn't model those.  https://tinyurl.com/y54t5ylo

Chowder clams are big, 4-5"  I've seen 1/2 shells wash up at the beach.  

Off Ocean City we have far more horseshoe crabs wash up.  Now there would be a 3D project.  Some are big 14" across. 

For you flatlanders, horseshoe crabs have been around since the dinosaurs.  They are not considered edible.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 1,495 posts
Posted by FRRYKid on Monday, July 29, 2019 6:01 PM

These are river clams I am describing. The river that runs by the ranch where I grew up gets them on a sandbar on the opposite bank from the property. IMS the shells were ovalish about 3-4" on the wide side and 1.5 to 2" on the narrow side.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • 5,443 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, July 29, 2019 6:04 PM

I've learned something.  Our rivers are brackish waters.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

  • Member since
    November, 2002
  • From: US
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Posted by wp8thsub on Monday, July 29, 2019 6:59 PM

FRRYKid
IMS the shells were ovalish about 3-4" on the wide side and 1.5 to 2" on the narrow side.

That scales out to around .040" or so for HO.  Maybe you could squash some .040" styrene rod into an oval cross section, then use slices of it.

Rob Spangler

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 1,495 posts
Posted by FRRYKid on Monday, July 29, 2019 7:49 PM

That dimension is what I had come up with. (Scale converter app on my cell phone.) Reason I went with the beads is that they have just enough shine to replicate the shine that could be seen on a sunny day off the shells.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 9,424 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, July 29, 2019 7:53 PM

wp8thsub
...Maybe you could squash some .040" styrene rod into an oval cross section, then use slices of it.

I'm no expert on clamasaurs and oysterettes, but  .040" round rod, cut on an angle, should yield an oval shape.

Wayne

  • Member since
    November, 2002
  • From: US
  • 2,284 posts
Posted by wp8thsub on Monday, July 29, 2019 9:21 PM

doctorwayne
I'm no expert on clamasaurs and oysterettes, but  .040" round rod, cut on an angle, should yield an oval shape.

Well yeah if you want to state the obvious that I somehow wasn't even picturing. Sad

Rob Spangler

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 4,922 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Tuesday, July 30, 2019 6:00 AM

BigDaddy
Off Ocean City we have far more horseshoe crabs wash up.

.

We get lots of dead Horseshoe Crabs washing up onto Fort Myers Beach in the winter time. I have only seen live ones in aquariums.

.

I never thought of modeling one of them. They are unique and would add something to a beach scene.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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