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Help with Alaska APU Spur Design

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Help with Alaska APU Spur Design
Posted by SpartanCook on Friday, May 24, 2019 7:24 PM

Hello All,

After much discussion with my wife I think we have realized that the house we just built with a dedicated train room will not be our home long term. We most likely will be moving with my work in the next 2-5 years. This rules out a large around the walls type layout as i had been planning. Now i would like to build a switching layout of the alaaska APU spur. This will help we also understand switching before the eventual start to my basement empire when we finally settle down. The spur design i believe i have down, and i will basically use google map and copy the layout from  https://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/8981?fbclid=IwAR1aBIWhvmKF2Ns9nd9SXB03BWou4EPwR-ramqDOeZl8Vpl24KFaGwK1EdM

 

My Question to you all is this. How would you set this switching up where it will eventually connect to a large anchorage yard? The plan is to make this spur completely moveable in sections so that i can transport it and use it eventually in my basement empire. I would like a small section of the anchorage yard represented and i have plenty of space, i just dont know enough on how to switch this spur to design what i need.

Thanks in advance

  • Member since
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Posted by SPSOT fan on Sunday, May 26, 2019 12:06 PM

I’d say you could make a start to the yard ladder on one end or the layout, and then add on to the yard later when you put it in your permanent plan. Or you could model a small section of the main line that could later connect to the yard when you expand.

The plan you have linked to has a bit of what looks to me like the ARR main line heading to anchorage yard. I’d say you just add on to that. You may want to leave a bit of space at the edge of the plan to be able to possibly cut some of the layout to fit it’s future home.

To be honest I am a bit confused about what you are asking. Hope this helps. I suspect some other forums members may have more experience and ideas with your situation.

Regards, Isaac

I model my railroad and you model yours! I model my way and you model yours!

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, May 26, 2019 12:34 PM

SPSOT fan
To be honest I am a bit confused about what you are asking

Me too. 

Some people make 4' modules, but to me that complicates turnout placement.  I made one of mine 7' and that was too long as it is difficult to get it to the stairway and too long for my SUV.

As for the track plan, that is short yard lead for all those spurs.  I'll be curious as to what Cuyama says about mixing facing and trailing point spurs.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by gregc on Sunday, May 26, 2019 2:03 PM

SpartanCook
i just dont know enough on how to switch this spur to design what i need.

i don't see any passing sidings (runarounds) so that the locomotive swap train ends and switch the spurs facing in both directions.   It also means pushing the train in both directions.

it would be nice if you could post the track plans on MRH here.

it looks like the pair of spurs at the back of the plan represent the staging at anchorage.   If a train is pulled out of those track (going right to left), it enters the spur on the left and then pushes the train thru the main part of the trackplan you're most interested in.   But without any runarounds, it can only switch cars on the facing point spurs.

i think it needs several runarounds where the loco can swap ends of the train.   A turnout could be added connecting the ends of the spurs on the left side of the plan so that the loco can pull the train out of the staging, swap ends and then pull the train thru the mainline.   All the trailing point spurs can be switched in this direction.

a passing siding can be added near the right side of the mainline (unless you convert one of the spurs).   again, the loco swaps ends of the train and can now switch all the trailing point spurs as it returns.

when the train gets into the siding on the left, the loco can push the train back into staging.    An escape track (passing siding) can be added to staging so that a train can be pulled into staging to avoid the potential for derailments when pushing a train.

  

 

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, May 26, 2019 2:13 PM

I think you should just build a switching lay out, the way you want it, and when you settle down in a house so you can build your "dream lay out", start over, with a plane that works.

Use your current switching idea as a learning step., a sort of "how to" and "how not to" build, wire, place scenery, build structures, operate, fix locos, build rolling stock, etc., etc.

By the time you get into your permanent home, you'll want to change it all anyway.

Mike.

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Posted by Bigjim7 on Monday, May 27, 2019 6:57 AM
That Ho plan seems it has allot of S turns and hard curves in it. Or am I missing something.
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Posted by SpartanCook on Thursday, May 30, 2019 6:41 PM

Thanks everyone for the replies, in re-reading the comment I agree I was jumbled and didn’t make sense. so I will rephrase my questions.

I want to keep only the switching section of the layout that was linked. I will remove the staging. What will I need in a yard to switch this spur? Sounds like I for sure need to include run around track.

My main goal of this shelf layout is to learn some switching operations. If it looks good enough I will incorporate it hopefully into a future layout.

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Posted by cv_acr on Wednesday, June 05, 2019 4:00 PM

gregc

i think it needs several runarounds where the loco can swap ends of the train. 

 

You don't need "several", just one. And I'm not familiar with the prototype and source inspiration, but it looks like the spur comes off a siding or runaround on the ARR main in the partial diagram on the linked page.

The switcher can run around its cars on that runaround and push them into or out of the spur. There's no real need for additional runarounds on the spur; that one will support the operations as long as it's included in the model layout.

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Posted by SpartanCook on Wednesday, June 12, 2019 9:53 PM

Hello All,

 

Thank you for your help, I finally had some time to put everything i wanted down on anyrail and see how it looked. Below is what i came up with. 18' long with 9 of it being 3' Wide (I will be able to walk all the way around) and the rest 2'. I will make it out of 6, 3' sections so that i potentially can dissassmble it and use it in a future forever home layout.

Any advice on changes or tweaks to the track plan would be helpful. The goal again is a fun switching layout to learn some switching operations, and the yard to display some rolling stock.

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Posted by SpartanCook on Sunday, June 16, 2019 9:12 AM

Any thoughts or suggestions on my design? First time desInning with switching in mind so I wanted to see what you all thought. 

Happy fathers day to any other fathers out there

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Posted by Colorado Ray on Sunday, June 16, 2019 3:17 PM

With the Track spacing in the yard, I presume this is n scale.  Overall the concept looks very nice with the industrial spur separated by the creek.  Only comment might be to make several of the industrial spurs a bit longer.  In n scale several only hold two cars at most.

Ray

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Posted by SPSOT fan on Sunday, June 16, 2019 6:57 PM

I agree with Ray that the spurs on the branch could be lenghtened a bit! A view block of some sort between the yard and industries could be nice just to split the layout into two scenes. I'm not saying a full backdrop, but maybe some buildings or trees. You may consider adding a longer drill track for the yard if you plan on doing any serious switching there. Otherwise it looks pretty good!

Regards, Isaac

I model my railroad and you model yours! I model my way and you model yours!

  • Member since
    March, 2013
  • 241 posts
Posted by Colorado Ray on Sunday, June 16, 2019 10:02 PM

Not sure I agree with SPSOT on the backdrop.  I really like the idea of the stream and road separating the scenes.  There are many prototype situations where an industrial spur parallels a mainline but on opposite sides of a barrier like a waterway or major highway. 

Ray

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