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Sectional Layout Scenes that are Removable

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Sectional Layout Scenes that are Removable
Posted by railandsail on Thursday, January 10, 2019 2:06 PM

At time frame 19:27 in this video Ken Patterson shows a modular section that is removable from the layout...
 

Ken Patterson ,......He discussed it in one of his "what's neat" videos...

https://youtu.be/7ZQLxQth5UI?t=1167

Where would be a good place to find more extensive information on this type construction??

It appears to be a sectional foam scene that sits on a plywood base, and can be lifted from the layout for work or photos in another location,...even outdoors.

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Posted by railandsail on Thursday, January 10, 2019 2:11 PM

I have in mind covering all my plywood decks/shelfs with 3/16" foamcore, then making cutout portions with a sharp instrument for those areas I want to be able to 'extract' from the layout at certain times.

The track itself then may, or may not, have its own roadbed (cork, perhaps 1/8") laid upon the foamcore.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, January 10, 2019 2:53 PM

railandsail
Where would be a good place to find more extensive information on this type construction??

I've watched that video before, cool idea.  I think it's pretty self-explanatory, just by looking at the modular out side.  You can see that the bottom layers are solid one piece sections, to keep the modular rigid for moving it around.  All of the modular sections look thick, with layers of foam.

Do this with just a thin layer supporting the modular would lead to problems, trying to move it.

I know you like extensive, endless research, but in the video, he mentions that the September issue of that series, he talks about the design.  Maybe check that out.  Looking at the date on this video, it looks like 2015.

I can remove individual structures and scenery areas, but not to the extent that Ken can take his apart.  I made parts of mine removable to access the hidden track work I have.

Mike.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, January 10, 2019 3:22 PM

Patterson puts out a lot of videos.  On some he builds dioramas so you could get a look at the construction.   He also has a site with his name on it where he sells things including videos.  I can't get the free previews to download.

Two and three layers of 2" foam add a lot of strength and rigidity that you will have to get with the plywood in your proposed technique.  A lot of the MRVP layouts are modular design.  I have a subscription, but some of those might be free and they all have been articles in MR

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

PED
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Posted by PED on Thursday, January 10, 2019 5:18 PM

I used 2" blue foam and it is plenty strong to support my N scale layout. I have supports about every 16-18". No plywood base. However, I would not try to climb on it. I can put some serious weight on it as long as I am directly over a support piece but that is risky because it may leave an indention in the foam.

Paul D

N scale Washita and Santa Fe Railroad
Southern Oklahoma circa late 70's

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Posted by railandsail on Thursday, January 10, 2019 9:48 PM

Perhaps I have not expressed my desires correctly,...maybe I should have said, "attaching structures to scenery"?  I found a discussion on this forum from back in 2010 by Doctorwayne,...

It can also depend on how you've constructed your layout.  Mine is patching plaster over window screen in most areas, but urban areas and larger structures sit atop plywood, cut either for individual buildings or for a group of buildings.  The ones on plywood are usually secured by the addition of ground cover, held in place by a mixture of white glue and water.  The buildings don't move, but can be removed with a little effort (which messes-up the nearby scenery).  

I also use sidewalks and roads to hold structures in place:

Stock pens are built-up as sub-assemblies, with the corner posts longer on their bottom ends than the intermediate posts.  I then drill holes into the plaster at appropriate points, assembling the pens as the walls are installed.  Once the cement has dried, the entire assembly can be removed as a unit for any required detailing work.

Smaller structures, like this shed, are set into a suitable excavation in the hardened plaster, then the ground cover added, holding it in place;

The Atlas water tower in the photo above was secured by pressing the plastic base onto (but not too far into) the wet plaster.  The tower can be lifted off its "footings", which are part of the base.

The structures in this lumberyard are secured by a couple of methods, with the near one (with the painted-on sign) and the far one both held in place by the scenic glue.  The partially hidden structure with the reddish roof is partially in an excavation into the hardened plaster (through the screen, too) while the one in the centre of the yard has the front pilings secured by the ground cover, with the unseen ones inserted into holes drilled in the plaster.  The styrene fence posts were installed in holes drilled in the plaster, then the horizontal framing was added.  A board was installed at each end of the fence, then, after the cement had set, the fence was removed and taken to the workbench for installation of the rest of the boards (the "ground" here is level, so it was easy to align the bottoms of the boards as they were installed).  The completed fence was re-planted in the post holes, then ground cover added.

And some buildings, like Creechan Fine Fuels' office building are not fastened in place at all, allowing them to be easily removed for cleaning:

Wayne

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Posted by railandsail on Thursday, January 10, 2019 10:23 PM

....on another forum...

Rick Sutton

Here's a few photos of the modules/dominoes that I built to allow for removal to workbench. No track is on a domino, only structures and scenery. 

Area of domino modification. 4 sections surrounded by track on heavier construction. The track sections have had strips of wood added for the dominoes to bear on.

Domino construction. Foamcore is 5mm thick and balsa 1/2" (13.48mm).

 

 

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Posted by railandsail on Thursday, January 10, 2019 10:28 PM

I excerpted this discussion over there as I was reading thru it,...just another reason to consider 'removable structures/scenes,...
 

Pelsea

I am doing much the same, as I definitely know there will be a move some day. I also have to deal with the fact that my layout is 30" deep. If I were building in a disciplined back to front order rather than my scattershot ADD approach that would be a small problem, but I need to remove front items to work on the back. And the back is just a bit too far for a lot of reaching (there's no track back there), the things up there will be on units that I can build at my bench.

Here is an in progress example:

Eventually, the whole layout will be a jigsaw puzzle with very little actually glued down:

I still have several questions to answer: 

  • What is the best base for these little scene modules? I tried foamcore, but it warped after about 6 months. Pink foam also has long term stability issues. (I cut module bases to size, and left them in place for a year.)  This one is on 1/16 plywood which seems stable enough, but is a bit flexible. (There is a reinforcing board along the back behind the fence.) I've looked at various plastics, but it's hard to get scenic material to stick. I may wind up with a plastic base with plywood sections attached by screws.
  • How do you hide the edges? I'm thinking a mix of soft scenery and viewblocks like that fence, but I'd like to explore more possibilities.
  • I will eventually light these buildings. How shall I deal with the wires? I've experimented with embedding sockets in the pink foam for my bridges, maybe I'll do some version of that.

https://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/32471

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Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, January 11, 2019 7:49 AM

No, you started out asking for this:

railandsail
Where would be a good place to find more extensive information on this type construction??

Ken Patterson's method of removable LAYOUT sections.

Methods to make your buildings removable is a different discussion.

Mike.

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