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Newberry-Columbia, SC: Printed buildings added to the railroad

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  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • 488 posts
Newberry-Columbia, SC: Printed buildings added to the railroad
Posted by robert sylvester on Tuesday, January 08, 2019 11:09 AM

WhistlingI was going through my Evans DVD Disc of printable buildings and decided to copy three of them for background detail.

They are actually fun to build and for background buildings I think they look pretty good. The one thing I would change would be if printing on photographic paper for strength, use the back side or dull side, I used the glossy side which is for photographs.

I applied each wall to Gator Board cut to size, with white glue. I used the Gator Board for added strength and to  prevent warping, then built the buildings, again using white glue. Then I placed them on the l           101-2458.jpg

101-2459.jpg

layout for background.

The first picture is the gas station, the one below is a lawyers office.

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The bottom picture is a general store in a small town.

I think they of course fill space and add character.

Robert Sylvester

Newberry-Columbia, SC

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2010
  • 3,616 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, January 08, 2019 12:10 PM

Looks good Robert.  At Milwaukee's Trainfest, there is a city traction layout, called the Gypsy Lines, that is all printed buildings, and it looks phenomenal.

Mike.

 

  • Member since
    October, 2007
  • From: Fullerton, California
  • 917 posts
Posted by hornblower on Tuesday, January 08, 2019 7:56 PM

Printing your buildings out multiple times on paper stock of differing thickness and finish allows you to layer your buildings to produce a more three dimensional look.  Printing the first layer on glossy paper gives you shiny windows.  A second layer printed on regular paper with the window panes cut out and placed over the first layer gives you flat wall textures and shiny window glass.  Cutting the various window, door and other details out of a third printing on card stock gives you three dimensional details to place on the second layer.

I have also used printed paper siding on HO scale styrene structures.  Its a great way to add tiny details to your structure and you really have to look hard to see its only paper.

For shingle roofing, I like to tightly crumple the printed shingles to give them more texture.  I partially flatten out the paper before applying it to the roof.  It always looks better than just gluing the flat paper to the roof.

I like to use powdered pastels to weather my printed buildings.

Printed structures work even better in N scale.

Hornblower

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • 488 posts
Posted by robert sylvester on Thursday, January 10, 2019 7:19 AM

Bow

Hornblower:

Your suggestion as to getting some depth to the windows and doors is a great idea. I think this weekend I am going to try that. Print one layer with the glossy side for the windows and doors then use the backside, (dull), for the walls, have I got that right. Cut out the windows and doors on the dull side and place it over the glossy side, giving it a framed look.

It would make a difference.

Thanks.

Robert Sylvester,

Newberry-Columbia, SC

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