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Painting the Walthers Cement Plant

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Painting the Walthers Cement Plant
Posted by kasskaboose on Monday, December 17, 2018 1:35 PM

Any color suggestions for painting this large nearly built kit: https://www.walthers.com/valley-cement-plant-kit ? I've seen some great work using one color for all the structures; some also have used different colors too.  Using a spray can of dull gray is one option.  Given the large size, should I use a spray can over a brush since I don't have an air brush?  If using a spray can, how to avoid the buildings from sticking to the paper unerneath to catch excess paint?

I plan to cover the windows and masking certain areas (iff needed).  

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, December 17, 2018 1:56 PM

kasskaboose
If using a spray can, how to avoid the buildings from sticking to the paper unerneath to catch excess paint?

Many of the discount stores or even a grocery store will have bamboo skewers in several lengths. These things are handy for lots of Model RR tasks.

Lay them out so your parts rest on them. They will keep the paint from sticking. I use them to slip truck frames onto for painting, too.

As for "rattle can" painting, I would suggest Rustoleum Camouflage Khaki color as the base concrete color, then very light mists of a light gray primer over this.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Specialty-12-oz-Khaki-Camouflage-Spray-Paint-1917830/100130811

Primers vary considerably. I like the way Krylon sprays but their gray is a quite dark shade. There is a WalMart brand that is a nice, light gray called Home Shades, SKU 20066 21350 that I like. Rustoleum primers are heavy bodied and go on thick, IMHO.

Additional streaks and fading/weathering can be done with weathering powders, Pan Pastel type and a fine sponge or make up brush.

For the corrugated metal, you can choose just about any color but if you want to represent a bare galvanized look I like Rustoleum Metallic Matte Nickel, 7277830.

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, December 17, 2018 2:15 PM

Because I do any spray painting outside, or in the garage, I usually double over strips of painters tape, sick them to pieces of cardboard, and/or the cardboard flats that 12 packs come in, stick the parts to the tape, and then paint.  With the parts tapped to the cardboard, you can hold on to it and move it around, if needed, while you paint, and the part stays secure to the cardboard.

It's kind of a pain in the winter, but as soon as I'm done spraying, I get the stuff back inside.  My work area is in the basement, so I do not use spray cans inside.

Ed's idea sounds good, too, with the skewers.

I don't think you'll be putting on such a heavy coat that would cause the panels to stick that bad.

As far as weathering techniques, I do pretty much what Ed suggest, along with dry brushing.

That kit looks like quite a build!

Mike.

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, December 17, 2018 2:16 PM

The Rust-Oleum textured spray paints come in a variety of colors.  They produce a rough surface, which I like because it scatters light rather than reflecting it.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by NittanyLion on Monday, December 17, 2018 2:22 PM

mbinsewi

Because I do any spray painting outside, or in the garage, I usually double over strips of painters tape, sick them to pieces of cardboard, and/or the cardboard flats that 12 packs come in, stick the parts to the tape, and then paint.  With the parts tapped to the cardboard, you can hold on to it and move it around, if needed, while you paint, and the part stays secure to the cardboard.

Same, although I use scrap bits of foamcore for the sturdier feel. 

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Posted by Doughless on Monday, December 17, 2018 5:23 PM

I would paint the metal parts rattle can silver.  Then dullcoat or rattle can matte finish to cut down the sheen. 

Thinly brush on streams of reddish brown and also dark gray to represent weathering that gathers in the ribs. Using mineral spritis to thin a pallet of paint to water colors consistency is all it takes really.  Mix the colors right on a piece of scrap cardboard as you go.  Some will have more red than brown, and might tend to mix themselves again right on the building, which helps to vary the weathered look.

The concrete buildings can be painted a biege/gray mix.  Krylon and Rustoleum used to have a color called Putty that looked like concrete, IMO.  They should still have something similar.

I would sort the parts and paint them right on the sprues before assembly, making sure that I then lightly sanded the edges that were to be glued in order for the glue to bond to the plastic.  (do the weathering part after assembly)

- Douglas

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, December 17, 2018 6:15 PM

mbinsewi
I usually double over strips of painters tape, sick them to pieces of cardboard, and/or the cardboard flats that 12 packs come in, stick the parts to the tape, and then paint.

That is also the method I use for small parts, Mike. I "presumed" he was refering to the large wall and structure assemblies that wouldn't have a tendency to blow away from the nozzle blast. That's why I suggested the skewer sticks.

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by wp8thsub on Monday, December 17, 2018 6:37 PM

Doughless
I would paint the metal parts rattle can silver.  Then dullcoat or rattle can matte finish to cut down the sheen. 

One thing to remember abour silver is how it can craze plastic and ruin the surface.  It doesn't happen every time, but the lack of predictability encourages me to take precautions.  I apply a base coat of gray primer first, and spray the silver on after that dries.  That's been 100% effective in preventing crazing.

Ideal Cement Loader

by wp8thsub, on Flickr

I have a large cement plant with various kitbashed and scratchbuilt structures.  All of the major painting was done with spray cans.  Some of it was a color called "Stone Gray" from the craft store (I forget the brand).  When that ran out I switched to Testors "Camouflage Gray," which makes a nice brownish gray concrete color.

Ideal Coal Unload

by wp8thsub, on Flickr

Most of the parts intended to represent metal were painted with a Krylon almond color.  It was satin or semi-gloss, which didn't matter after flat finish was applied using Treehouse Studio acrylic flat from Hobby Lobby.

I touched up the railings with some safety yellow from acrylic craft paint.

Weathering was accomplished with acrylic washes and pastels, including the banding effect for the slip formed concrete on the silos.

Rob Spangler

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, December 17, 2018 8:00 PM

Cool, this post brought out pics from Rob Spangler, as we all enjoy what Dr. Wayne shows, and I love it when you post pics, Rob. Between you two guys, is the realism I aim for.

Mike.

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Posted by kasskaboose on Monday, December 17, 2018 9:07 PM

Great suggestions everyone!  The photos posted are top-shelf.  They provide one fantastic method of achieving fanstic results.  I have Rust-oleum Granite satin spray paint.  It's item #249078.  Would that suffice this structure or is the sheen too shiny?

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, December 17, 2018 9:30 PM

kasskaboose
I have Rust-oleum Granite satin spray paint.  It's item #249078.

I have some of that, too. In my opinion it is way too dark. It looks like freshly rolled steel plate color. Under our model lighting you want to lean toward lighter shades.

Spray a sample and place it where your cement plant will be and see how it looks. I'll bet the Granite Gray might be good for the calciner tube, though.

 Cement2 by Edmund, on Flickr

It is always easier to darken a light shade than to try to lighten something dark.

 Cement1 by Edmund, on Flickr

 Cement by Edmund, on Flickr

I put this plant in place over ten years ago and kind-of forgot about it Embarrassed Now that I look at the photos I believe I'll have to dust the silos with a little light gray Pan Pastel to tone down the tan color a bit. Pretty sure I used Polly Scale Aged Concrete. IIRC the blue/teal of the metal sheds is GN Big Sky Blue with some gray added to it.

Maybe it's time to revisit this sleeping giant...

 

Regards, Ed

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Posted by wp8thsub on Monday, December 17, 2018 9:43 PM

kasskaboose
I have Rust-oleum Granite satin spray paint.  It's item #249078.  Would that suffice this structure or is the sheen too shiny?

Sheen makes no difference if the color is what you want.  I used a semi-gloss for part of my cement plant too, but you can't tell because of the flat acrylic overspray.

Rob Spangler

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Posted by dknelson on Tuesday, December 18, 2018 10:12 AM

The late Art Curren would kill the inherent plastic shine, which allowed him to use the originals cast in colors, and give a better surface "tooth" for painting if he did paint, by scrubbing the plastic parts with a toothbrush and an abrasive cleanser such as Comet or Ajax or Old Dutch Cleanser.  

I am leary about some of the textured spray paints that are out there - sometimes they look good to the eye but not so good in photography, plus the nozzles are more prone to clog.

The MR staff seems to be using the Rustoleum 2X Painter's Touch rattle cans for primers more and more.  This might be a good use for the Ace Hardware coupons they send since Michaels and Hobby Lobby (with their 40% and 50% coupons) don't carry the line, at least not the ones near me.  That is where I get my DullCote however.  

Dave Nelson

 

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Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, December 26, 2018 8:57 AM

gmpullman

 

 
kasskaboose
I have Rust-oleum Granite satin spray paint.  It's item #249078.

 

I have some of that, too. In my opinion it is way too dark. It looks like freshly rolled steel plate color. Under our model lighting you want to lean toward lighter shades.

Spray a sample and place it where your cement plant will be and see how it looks. I'll bet the Granite Gray might be good for the calciner tube, though.

 Cement2 by Edmund, on Flickr

It is always easier to darken a light shade than to try to lighten something dark.

 Cement1 by Edmund, on Flickr

 Cement by Edmund, on Flickr

I put this plant in place over ten years ago and kind-of forgot about it Embarrassed Now that I look at the photos I believe I'll have to dust the silos with a little light gray Pan Pastel to tone down the tan color a bit. Pretty sure I used Polly Scale Aged Concrete. IIRC the blue/teal of the metal sheds is GN Big Sky Blue with some gray added to it.

Maybe it's time to revisit this sleeping giant...

 

Regards, Ed

 

Marvelous Ed. I assume that is the Walthers Madusa structure, and what others?

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Posted by kasskaboose on Wednesday, December 26, 2018 12:02 PM

What I found that works is craft white paint with a few drops of gray mixed together.  The result is an off-white look.  I need to get more craft paint but like the first coat.  Interesting to note that some of the buildings look slightly different, which is quite common in a large facility.

Whatever color you pick, it seems that avoiding dark and bold colors makes sense.

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Wednesday, December 26, 2018 12:38 PM

The Rust-Oleum sprays have varying textures.  The black speckled-and-textured spray has a coarse texture, while cans like "sand" have the finer texture more suitable for structure walls.  I like the black stuff for simulating asphalt roofs.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, December 26, 2018 12:54 PM

For GERN Industries, I mixed the colour using Pollyscale Reefer White with some Pollyscale brown (don't recall which one) and some yellow, too.  I didn't keep track of the proportions, either, since the plant was meant to look as if it weren't all built at the same time.  I think that I had two or three bottles of the stuff, all slightly different, as there's lots of places to use a "concrete" colour on many layouts.  As the paint was used-up, I simply added the remnants to one of the other bottles....



Another thing to keep in mind is that some concrete structures did, over time, get painted - I recall some curtain-wall type buildings where the concrete portions were definitely not bare concrete.  Most of them, unfortunately, have been torn down.
I used a similar colour for the station in Dunnville, even though it's meant to represent one clad in ashlar.  Depending on where the limestone is quarried, though, the colour will vary, and I liked the warmer tones as opposed to grey...

...the scribed-in "mortar joints" don't show all that well in the photo, but those were usually quite narrow on the real ones, too.

I'm not sure, but I think that this one was probably done with Pollyscale's "Aged Concrete", likely with dollops of a couple other colours added...brown and/or yellow, perhaps...

This one is also a custom-mixed colour, starting with Reefer White.  When first painted it had a distinct greenish cast (who'da thunk adding green to the mix would make it look greenish?), almost like new concrete....

Because of that, I decided to give the entire structure a wash of thinned India ink (in the photo above, the "brick" portions had already been painted and are covered in masking tape), but am not overly fond of the results, as it was supposed to represent a not-too-old building...

The lighting on your layout will influence your perception of the colour, so it wouldn't hurt to do a few test swipes of paint on white styrene to give you an idea if the colour "looks right".
I very seldom use a colour right out of the bottle, so don't be afraid to experiment a bit - adding a drop or two, or a brushload of what might be an appropriate colour to a small amount of paint should help to give you some direction as to what works and what doesn't.

Wayne

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Posted by gmpullman on Thursday, December 27, 2018 2:43 AM

railandsail
Marvelous Ed. I assume that is the Walthers Madusa structure, and what others?

Thank You Brian. 

Those additions you see in the photo are more for grain use than cement, but at the time, late 1990s, that's all there was. What you see in the photo is the Grain Surge Bin 933-2935 and parts of the Grain Leg 933-2936.

Since then there has been several kits useful for aggregate transport and storage.

https://www.walthers.com/aggregate-bins-kit

https://www.modeltrainstuff.com/walthers-ho-933-4036-rail-to-road-aggregate-transfer-kit/

and several different conveyors:

https://www.walthers.com/modern-conveyor-kit-pkg-3

Just use Google>image search to find lots of ideas.

https://tinyurl.com/y83jwr8w

Even parts from the asphalt kit or concrete kit can be interchanged. Do some digging and research.

Thank You and Good Luck, Ed

 

 

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Posted by robert sylvester on Thursday, January 10, 2019 9:01 AM

Huh?This is a silo complex I built years ago, and I left it the color it came in. I have decided to seal the longitudinal crack and paint it concrete this weekend. I'll take aother picture when I am finished to see the difference.

101-2479.jpg

Thanks,

Robert Sylvester

Newberry-Columbia, SC

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Posted by kasskaboose on Thursday, January 10, 2019 12:48 PM

Rob,

Looking forward to seeing the finished product.

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Posted by railandsail on Thursday, January 10, 2019 1:32 PM

gmpullman

 Just use Google>image search to find lots of ideas.

https://tinyurl.com/y83jwr8w

Even parts from the asphalt kit or concrete kit can be interchanged. Do some digging and research.

Thank You and Good Luck, Ed

 

 

 

 

I have recently been using Bing as my searching tool, because Google keeps bring up TONS of ad supported pages rather than 'meat' I'm searching for.

 

 

 

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Posted by robert sylvester on Monday, January 14, 2019 10:25 AM

Confused You can see the comparisons on this same forum, just go to the topic 'A change in color scheme can make a difference", just before this post I have a picture of each.

Robert Sylvester

Newberry-Columbia, SC

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Posted by robert sylvester on Monday, January 14, 2019 10:35 AM

Cool I done did it with a new paint job and I repaired the gap with white caulk then painted over it.

101-2479.jpg

Before,

101-2622.jpg

After repair and paint job.

Robert Sylvester

Newberry-Columbia, SC

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Posted by kasskaboose on Tuesday, January 15, 2019 8:26 AM

Nice work!  I might need to use the chaulk to hide the seam.  I like how you made the footprint smaller to fit your layout.  No one says you must follow the instructions exactly.

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