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1/72 Scale Narrow Gauge Modeling

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1/72 Scale Narrow Gauge Modeling
Posted by hminky on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 1:52 PM

Found this idea on the net but was written up in Kalmbach's "Model Railroad Planning 2018". The issue featured Doug Tagsold's Colorado & Southern. The premise is using HO gauge equipment to represent 1/72 scale narrow gauge.



http://smallmr.com/wordpress/doug-tagsolds-colorado-southern-narrowgauge-modelrailroad-modelrail-train/

 Liking out-of-the-box thinking this is my take on the idea:

http://www.chainsawjunction.com/172n4/







Thank you if you Visit

Harold

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Posted by chutton01 on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 2:30 PM

Took me a minute to realize that while the modeler wouldn't be able to make much use of established Model Railroad scale items (HO, S, or even OO), there is a lot of military modeling in 1/72 scale from which they can obtain vehicles, figures, and even structures (used in dioramas and the like).

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Posted by hminky on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 2:45 PM

Objects aren't  "N, HO...S, O, etc. SCALE". An object is what it measures.

That has to be the attitude to go "out-of-the-box", there are lots of resources out there.

Harold

 

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Posted by trwroute on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 2:58 PM

That is a great idea.  I have been wanting to build another narrow gauge layout, but the HO narrow stuff is too small.  I've been looking at Sn3 again, but i think I'm going to research this more.  Thanks for the idea and the links.

Chuck - Modeling in HO scale and anything narrow gauge

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Posted by chutton01 on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 3:18 PM

hminky
Objects aren't  "N, HO...S, O, etc. SCALE". An object is what it measures.

That has to be the attitude to go "out-of-the-box", there are lots of resources out there.


Well, yes and no.
Models of prototypes with somewhat variable dimensions or sizes, such a bulk oil storage tank, can represent a smallish tank in 1/72 or a larger tank in 1/87 (HO) (The length ratio is about 83%) 
However, given a 1930 Ford Model A Tudor with a wheelbase of close to 103.5 inches, that same 103.5in wheelbase in HO works out to 85.6in in 1/72 scale, which will look noticibly odd if not downright silly - so you need a 1/72 scale Ford Tudor model.

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Posted by hminky on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 3:32 PM

Obviously an HO car isn't going to measure to a different scale.

Harold

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Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 5:57 PM

chutton01

 

 
hminky
Objects aren't  "N, HO...S, O, etc. SCALE". An object is what it measures.

That has to be the attitude to go "out-of-the-box", there are lots of resources out there.

 


Well, yes and no.
Models of prototypes with somewhat variable dimensions or sizes, such a bulk oil storage tank, can represent a smallish tank in 1/72 or a larger tank in 1/87 (HO) (The length ratio is about 83%) 
However, given a 1930 Ford Model A Tudor with a wheelbase of close to 103.5 inches, that same 103.5in wheelbase in HO works out to 85.6in in 1/72 scale, which will look noticibly odd if not downright silly - so you need a 1/72 scale Ford Tudor model.

 

 

 I think what harold is saying is the exact opposite - at whatever scale the model measures a 103.5" wheelbase, that's the scale the model is, regardless of what might be printed on the package. Compare the actual measurement to the prototype measurement, that's what scale the object is. 

 You can;t carry this to absurdity, and just arbitrarily decide some scale ratio to use, unless you plan to make most things yourself, but as harold has shown, there are plenty of scales not traditionally used for Model Railroading that have plenty of opportunity for taking commonly available items and adapting them to this other scale because they happen to scale out to perfectly plausible dimensions in that non-traditional scale. 

                                   --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by hminky on Friday, October 05, 2018 12:34 PM

Got my copy of "Model Railroad Planning 2018" and Doug Tagsold's Colorado & Southern is a really great layout. Scale1/72 gives inexpensive almost ready-to-run narrow gauge.

The Roundhouse/MDC/Athearn equipment looks really great.

Went into the seventh level of my ungodly abyss of a train room and extracted some Roundhouse cars:









What more can I ask narrow gauge 4-4-0's and C-class 2-8-0's? Cheap, available narrow gauge in a large enough small scale to permit viable layout building.

Thanks Doug for bringing this brilliant idea to light. Can smell layout building.

We have a scale to download:

http://www.chainsawjunction.com/172n4/172scale.pdf

Thanks if you visit the website.

http://www.chainsawjunction.com/172n4/

Harold

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Posted by 7j43k on Friday, October 05, 2018 9:01 PM

But (to me) it doesn't look like narrow gage.  It looks like small standard gage.  I have one narrow gage HO loco:  NCNG #9, a 2-8-0.  I can still work with that size.  If I had to go larger, I'd probably go to On3, because there's a lot out there already.

To me, the idea just isn't convincing.

Obviously, if it's convincing to you..........

 

 

Ed

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Posted by hminky on Friday, October 05, 2018 10:03 PM

7j43k
If I had to go larger, I'd probably go to On3, because there's a lot out there already.

Since Doug Tagsold had already dismantled a large On3 layout in his life time here is his reasoning from the MRP 2018:

Looks like narrow gauge to me.

On3 means cubic money. New ideas are not everyone's cup of tea.

Almost had this idea back in 2007 but was going for OO scale/4mm on HO track or 4'-1" gauge but the mechanicals weren't right. Never thought of 1/72, d-oh! It was right there in front of me, those are 1/72 figures.

Doug's idea is inexpensive and easy to do.

To me everything looks like narrow gauge.

Harold

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Posted by hminky on Saturday, October 06, 2018 9:39 AM

This idea really does work.



If you have imagination and not rigid in thinking.

Harold

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Posted by IRONROOSTER on Sunday, October 07, 2018 7:24 AM

7j43k
But (to me) it doesn't look like narrow gage. It looks like small standard gage.

I agree.  It's really HO with slightly larger buildings and people.  And since the details like grab iron size and spacing are still HO, you need to keep the people away from it. 

Looking at the pictures in the MRP 2018, it just doesn't look like narrow gauge, it looks like a late 19th century standard gauge railroad.

Paul

 

If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
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Posted by hminky on Sunday, October 07, 2018 8:00 AM

IRONROOSTER

 

 
7j43k
But (to me) it doesn't look like narrow gage. It looks like small standard gage.

 

I agree.  It's really HO with slightly larger buildings and people.  And since the details like grab iron size and spacing are still HO, you need to keep the people away from it. 

Looking at the pictures in the MRP 2018, it just doesn't look like narrow gauge, it looks like a late 19th century standard gauge railroad.

Paul

You can either see that it works or you don't see that it works.

To me it always worked just couldn't find the scale that works best.

If you can't see narrow gauge just keep what you are doing.

The grab iron spacing does work out.

'nough said

Harold

 

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Posted by 7j43k on Sunday, October 07, 2018 3:04 PM

Using HO track and equipment for narrow gage modeling can certainly be done:  witness On30.

But if you wanted to use HO track to model a REAL (US) narrow gage, you would get 1/55 if you model 3 foot, and 1/37 if you modeled 2 foot.

The latter is quite close to 1/35, which is a very common military modeling scale.  In case you don't want to model 2 foot railroading in Maine encountering a substantial armored presence (a REAL modeling opportunity, there!), there also appear to be an assortment of cars and people.

If you go the three foot route, I guess you could use 1/48 people and say "they grow tall around here".  A 6 foot human is 1.5" in O scale, and 1.3" in 1/55.

 

Ed

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Posted by hminky on Sunday, October 07, 2018 4:14 PM

7j43k

Using HO track and equipment for narrow gage modeling can certainly be done:  witness On30.

But if you wanted to use HO track to model a REAL (US) narrow gage, you would get 1/55 if you model 3 foot, and 1/37 if you modeled 2 foot.

Never heard of this 55n3 or On30 of which you speak? Really, give me a break.

This isn't my first narrow gauge rodeo, had the number one On30 website ever since 2004:

https://www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/

Came up with the term 55n3 in 2010:

http://www.55n3.info/

Had an Sn3.5 website in 2007 and revived about a month ago:

http://www.chainsawjunction.com/sn3_5/

Believe me, this is the most inexpensive and easiest way to model narrow gauge.

This is the same nonsense I heard in 2004 with On30, yeah all you guys said On30 was wrong. All the pickers of nits decried 55n3 as why reinvent the wheel in 2010. Sn3.5 has always been "wrong".

No, this is the best narrow gauge idea yet.

Harold

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Posted by 7j43k on Sunday, October 07, 2018 5:20 PM

Oh.  THIS is the best narrow gauge idea yet.  Not all the others.

Unless, of course, you actually want to model 3' gauge.  Then, maybe not so much.

 

Ed

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Posted by hminky on Sunday, October 07, 2018 5:31 PM

7j43k

Oh.  THIS is the best narrow gauge idea yet.  Not all the others.

Unless, of course, you actually want to model 3' gauge.  Then, maybe not so much.

This idea doesn't involve cubic money, great modeling skills or huge spaces, everything else requires one or all of the above.

That was the original draw to On30 it was affordable and easy. Now On30 costs as much as all the other narrow gauge and does require a lot of space. The other failing of On30 was there was never affordable structures requiring everything from scratch.

It is back to narrow gauge for everyone.

Harold

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Posted by hminky on Monday, October 08, 2018 5:47 AM

Our work-in-progress beta Mantua early boxcar conversion, $11 toy train box car to 24 foot 1880's narrow gauge boxcar buildable in an evening.



Finally, affordable and easy 1880's narrow gauge. Wooden cars and iron men!

Harold

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Posted by hminky on Monday, October 08, 2018 5:00 PM

We need moguls for early narrow gauge.

The Roundhouse Mogul has two versions the more common high wheeler and a scarcer low driver version which has a 1/72 43" drivers. They mechanically match early narrow gauge moguls .



The boiler is easily lowered and smaller drivers applied. The cab is the right size.



Harold

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Posted by hminky on Tuesday, October 09, 2018 6:41 AM

Cleaning up my train room I ran across this Bachmann HO ten-wheeler.

Looked Tweetsie, having a plan already in my bin I printed out a 1/72 scale drawing.



Yep, with a little bit of work we can be in the blue ridges with room to have real mountains.

Harold

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Posted by hminky on Tuesday, October 09, 2018 10:50 AM

Bigger 1/72 cabs are required to remove the HO look. That is a cab I built for making the Roundhouse HOn3 locomotive Sn2. Learning a 3d CAD modeling program and have the cab printed out probably would take less time.



Harold

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Posted by hminky on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 11:28 AM

Back to the fun!

The Tichy HO ore car would make a great coal "jimmy". Can be had for $5 a piece on the street.



Always wanted to find a use for these great little cars.

Harold

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Posted by hminky on Thursday, October 11, 2018 2:26 PM

"Objects aren't  "N, HO...S, O, etc. SCALE". An object is what it measures."

Wanting a engine crew for my 4-4-0 I found some Bachmann Branchline OO Scale figures from the UK.

Things are sometimes better than what the box says. The second guy from the right is our new OO scale Bachmann Branchline figure. The guys on his right and left are Preiser 1/72. The guy on the far left is a Langley Victorian OO.



Sometimes you need little wins in life
Harold

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Posted by hminky on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 12:53 PM

Designed a direct replacement 1/72 cab for the Bachmann HO 4-4-0 and had a 3d print made.





3d printing is great.

Harold

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