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Start of New layout

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  • Member since
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Start of New layout
Posted by John Graser on Monday, July 02, 2018 12:38 AM

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Posted by John Graser on Monday, July 02, 2018 12:40 AM

Tags: ho , design , layout
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, July 06, 2018 6:25 PM

Ah... Track planning in full size. I am right there with you. That is the only system I have to make sure it will all work when it is built.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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  • From: 53° 33′ N, 10° 0′ E
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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Saturday, July 07, 2018 12:24 AM

SeeYou190

Ah... Track planning in full size. I am right there with you. That is the only system I have to make sure it will all work when it is built.

-Kevin

How do you do a 1:1 scale mock-up with flex track I don´t know, but a well planned paper plan works as well, if you don´t cut corners and cheat on yourself when it comes to radii, switches and distance between parallel tracks.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by John Graser on Sunday, July 08, 2018 10:56 PM

We do have a ruff plan on paper to make sure it will fit the room.

Tags: layout , Plan , model , Railroad
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Posted by John Graser on Sunday, July 08, 2018 11:03 PM

Tags: layout , Module , model , train , Railroad
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Posted by BNSF UP and others modeler on Sunday, July 08, 2018 11:06 PM

I like how it is up on a balcony.

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Posted by John Graser on Sunday, October 21, 2018 10:20 PM

It's on a balcony and will also be in one bedroom.

John

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Monday, October 22, 2018 6:07 AM

John Graser

We do have a ruff plan on paper to make sure it will fit the room.

 

A scale drawing usually does the job so you don't have to do a full sized mock-up.  It's worked so far for me with 3 layouts.  Already have a scale drawing for the next made up.

I like how it is up on a balcony.

That's quite a long dive if anything is near the edge there!

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

Never tangle with a troll.  They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.

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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, October 22, 2018 6:21 AM

John, I knew instantly when watching that first video that I did not like you because you have a table saw and I don't. LOL 

Nice work. Keep us posted on your progress.

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Monday, October 22, 2018 7:17 AM

richhotrain

John, I knew instantly when watching that first video that I did not like you because you have a table saw and I don't. LOL 

Rich

Don't feel bad Rich, there was an indepth discussion at another forum (which shall not be named) where a member asked if a table saw was needed to build a layout as he was a bit fearful of using one (table saws do require a great deal of respect).  The consensus was that no, you don't really need one.  Those who did have a table saw definitely agreed, not necessary for layout building.

Even if I did have a table saw, I wouldn't even be able to bring home a 4x8' sheet in either of my cars; I simply have Home Depot or Lowes cut 4x8 down to a size I can use and fit in the car.  (I can fit 10 long boards in my car and 30" wide by 8' sheets, but not 4x8.  I'd have to tie that to my roof rack but don't bother when I can have it cut down.

My woodshop teacher taught us a healthy respect for table saws back in high school many moons ago so I've just gotten by without one and it's been no problem.

For what it's worth, I built my last layout using only 2 power tools, because I was on a budget: a sabre saw and a cordless drill.  It was certainly with a little care.

Since budget has now allowed, this year I added a compound sliding 10" miter saw and a circular saw.  The miter saw I would expect will speed things up this time around.

I'd say those four power tools are very useful in layout building:

- cordless drill (with a counter sink to predrill holes and avoid splitting wood)
- Saber saw (jig saw) for cutting curved cuts like sub road bed etc.
- Miter saw for fast cutting of benchwork pieces (legs and framing)
- Circular saw for long straight cuts.

As corner frame jig is a big help for attaching 90 corners for open grid frames and a bunch of C-clamps are very helpful for attaching risers and other items while screwing in place.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

Never tangle with a troll.  They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.

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Posted by kasskaboose on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 7:27 AM

Why not use a free track software planning tool before going to the actual layout?  It's much easier/faster that way.  Once you have the paper, putting it on the layout is easy--create a grid system on the foam, wood, etc.

Rio: I only have a cordless drill.  That's the only power tool, you really, really need.  Home Depot and Lowes can cut wood pieces.  Also, my local Home Depot does rip cuts, so I can get 4x8' stryene sheets cut to make fascia. For those who use foam, there's no need for those saws. 

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Posted by bearman on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 4:23 AM

Memo to riogrande and rich...I was born with 10 fingers and I intend to die with ten fingers.  I stay away from table saws and routers.  I did just fine with a compound mitre saw, circular saw, drill and jig saw when I built my layout.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 5:52 AM

bearman

Memo to riogrande and rich...I was born with 10 fingers and I intend to die with ten fingers.  I stay away from table saws and routers.  I did just fine with a compound mitre saw, circular saw, drill and jig saw when I built my layout. 

Like any power tool, a table saw requires the utmost in safety practices, proper clothing and eye protection, absence of distractions, etc.

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by Bigjim7 on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 7:04 AM
I use my Miter saw' or some call it a chop saw ect more than anything. Also 2 cordless drills. I use drywall screws for everything' makes building and taking apart easy.
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Posted by riogrande5761 on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 8:12 PM

bearman

Memo to riogrande and rich...I was born with 10 fingers and I intend to die with ten fingers.  I stay away from table saws and routers.  I did just fine with a compound mitre saw, circular saw, drill and jig saw when I built my layout.

No arguments from me.  The four power tools you listed is all I have.

The last layout I did only have a drill and saber saw.  Home Depot did all the major cuts on the 4x8 sheets but the Saber saw ie jigsaw, did all the rest. 

Kask, I double dog dare you to build my last layout with only a drill.  I'd be happy to post photos.  Sure, Home Depot cut my big 4x8 sheets down but there were many many other cuts to build all the open grid framing and more.  I think HD would have thought I was having a laugh if I asked them to make all those cuts too! Laugh  

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

Never tangle with a troll.  They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.

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Posted by Doughless on Thursday, October 25, 2018 7:25 AM

I've built 2 layouts using only a power chop/mitre saw to cut the x3 or x4 sticks.  I let Home Depot cut the plywood.  Yes, the layout ends up having square shelfs but that just leaves more room for scenery than carving out a different shape. 

If I wanted the plywood to curve in places I assume the only tool to use would be a jigsaw.

As for assembly, I use a hammer, finish nails, and yellow glue as well as a power screw driver/drill.

- Douglas

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Thursday, October 25, 2018 10:23 AM

Doughless

I've built 2 layouts using only a power chop/mitre saw to cut the x3 or x4 sticks.  I let Home Depot cut the plywood.  Yes, the layout ends up having square shelfs but that just leaves more room for scenery than carving out a different shape. 

If I wanted the plywood to curve in places I assume the only tool to use would be a jigsaw.

For sure the big 4x8 sheets are easiest to have cut down at Home Depot or Lowes etc. such as the large flat yard areas:

Heck, even if I had a table saw, I can't get the 4x8 sheets home since neither car will fit them.  But I can fit in a 30" x 8 foot sheet.

A mitre saw would definitely speed things up vs a sabre/jigsaw.  The down side to a mitersaw only without the jigsaw is cutting the sub roadbed curved pieces such as in the photo:

Conversely, a jig saw will let you cut the 3x and 4x frame pieces as well as the curved pieces, which is why I was able to build this layout with only the drill and saber saw.

As for assembly, I use a hammer, finish nails, and yellow glue as well as a power screw driver/drill.

Nails will work of course, but drywall screws are great because it was a snap to disassemble the layout down to bare benchwork components when it came time to break it down and move.

I simply backed out the screws and took things apart and saved everything including the screws.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

Never tangle with a troll.  They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.

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Posted by Doughless on Thursday, October 25, 2018 10:51 AM

riogrande5761

 

 
Doughless

I've built 2 layouts using only a power chop/mitre saw to cut the x3 or x4 sticks.  I let Home Depot cut the plywood.  Yes, the layout ends up having square shelfs but that just leaves more room for scenery than carving out a different shape. 

If I wanted the plywood to curve in places I assume the only tool to use would be a jigsaw.

 

For sure the big 4x8 sheets are easiest to have cut down at Home Depot or Lowes etc. such as the large flat yard areas:

Heck, even if I had a table saw, I can't get the 4x8 sheets home since neither car will fit them.  But I can fit in a 30" x 8 foot sheet.

A mitre saw would definitely speed things up vs a sabre/jigsaw.  The down side to a mitersaw only without the jigsaw is cutting the sub roadbed curved pieces such as in the photo:

Conversely, a jig saw will let you cut the 3x and 4x frame pieces as well as the curved pieces, which is why I was able to build this layout with only the drill and saber saw.

 

 
As for assembly, I use a hammer, finish nails, and yellow glue as well as a power screw driver/drill.

 

Nails will work of course, but drywall screws are great because it was a snap to disassemble the layout down to bare benchwork components when it came time to break it down and move.

I simply backed out the screws and took things apart and saved everything including the screws.

 

2x4 foot or 2x8 foot sections on a shelf.  Build the 2 x4 or 2 x 8 grid separately, then glue and finish nail the plywood section onto the box grid.  Screw the dried assembly directly onto the shelf brackets from underneath.

I use finish nails because they don't leave big screw heads for scenery.  I don't use full box grids either but just enough 1xs under the ply to act as a stiffener so the ply won't sag.  Essentially making an L girder out of the ply and a few 1xs.

- Douglas

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Posted by John Graser on Friday, October 26, 2018 12:17 AM

We tried use one but working with flex track on it was difficult.

 

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Posted by E-L man tom on Monday, October 29, 2018 11:06 AM

I build (and about to build my new layout) with L-girder construction. Uses less lumber for agruably the same strength.

Also, another word of advice:  glue nothing, (except the L-girders), in case you want to change and/or completely rebuild, or just tear it down. The lumber can be salvaged for that new or modified layout.

There's a member of our round-robin group that passed away about five years ago, who screwed and glued everything. That layout had to be completely trashed, using a Sawsall, crowbars and hammers. The entire thing went into the dumpster, track and all.

Tom Modeling the free-lanced Toledo Erie Central switching layout.
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Posted by John Graser on Saturday, November 10, 2018 8:50 PM

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Posted by John Graser on Friday, November 16, 2018 10:28 PM

Tags: layout , backdrop

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