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HO Custom Line Turnout Trimming

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  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
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HO Custom Line Turnout Trimming
Posted by FRRYKid on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 2:58 PM

Probably a rehash, but here goes: How much can the straight route on Atlas HO Custom Line #4s and #6s be trimmed? I am doing some reworking of some track in a yard to allow for some passenger cars to be on fourth yard track. The switch arrangement on the main yard track is a LH #6, a RH #4 and another LH #6. I have found that the arrangement is a bit long for the current track arrangement. (Redoing the arrangement would be a minor headache.) There is an existing bridge that the diverging route on the second #6 is interferring with. (Wherever that diverging route ends up will have a bridge installed for it as well.) As usual thank you for any assistance that can be provided.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 10:48 AM

On the point end I try to leave at least two ties beyond the long tie. On the frog end I try to leave at least six ties beyond the frog.

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I know some people trim closer than that.

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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  • From: Northern Virginia
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Posted by riogrande5761 on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 12:01 PM

There is not rule, I trim turnouts to fit where needed, but try to leave plenty of ties on either side of the frog or points.  I haven't had to trip as tight as Kevin (such as down to 2 ties from points or anything that radical yet).

 

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

Silly Aspie's, I have NT syndrome

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Posted by RR_Mel on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 2:16 PM

I’ve successfully cut up Atlas turnouts and if you leave the ties in place and just remove the rails it can be done.  I cut up four Atlas #6 turnouts to make a double crossover and they have worked flawlessly for over 5 years.
 
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
  • Member since
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  • From: Miles City, Montana
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Posted by FRRYKid on Thursday, June 28, 2018 7:26 PM

RR_Mel

I’ve successfully cut up Atlas turnouts and if you leave the ties in place and just remove the rails it can be done.  I cut up four Atlas #6 turnouts to make a double crossover and they have worked flawlessly for over 5 years. 

The only problem I see with that particular arrangement is that those rails appear to be soldered. I stink when it comes to soldering things. But it does give me a few ideas on how to proceed with the options I do have.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
  • Member since
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  • 3,175 posts
Posted by RR_Mel on Thursday, June 28, 2018 9:07 PM

FRRYKid

 

 
RR_Mel

I’ve successfully cut up Atlas turnouts and if you leave the ties in place and just remove the rails it can be done.  I cut up four Atlas #6 turnouts to make a double crossover and they have worked flawlessly for over 5 years. 

 

 

The only problem I see with that particular arrangement is that those rails appear to be soldered. I stink when it comes to soldering things. But it does give me a few ideas on how to proceed with the options I do have.

 

Actually only the two outside rails are soldered.  I use Walthers 948-841 joiners for my code 83 rails.  They fit tight enough that I don’t solder them.  I only soldered the two outside rails on my Mel Double Crossover to make sure it didn’t come apart while I was installing it.  It wasn’t an easy task to assemble the crossover, 12 joiners.  It took several attempts and lot of patience to mate all the rails, I didn’t want to chance it coming apart.
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 1,403 posts
Posted by FRRYKid on Thursday, June 28, 2018 9:41 PM

RR_Mel

Actually only the two outside rails are soldered.  I use Walthers 948-841 joiners for my code 83 rails.  They fit tight enough that I don’t solder them.  I only soldered the two outside rails on my Mel Double Crossover to make sure it didn’t come apart while I was installing it.  It wasn’t an easy task to assemble the crossover, 12 joiners.  It took several attempts and lot of patience to mate all the rails, I didn’t want to chance of it coming apart.

I run code 100 track but the ideas should be adaptable. That also gives me an idea about the situation: I have some wire glue that I have used to join a couple pieces of track that are part of a long curved crossing on what will be part of the same spur line.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, June 29, 2018 8:15 AM

riogrande5761
I haven't had to trip as tight as Kevin (such as down to 2 ties from points or anything that radical yet).

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Sorry, I gave the wrong impression there.

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I also very rarely trim any turnouts. The specifications I gave are just for when you absolutely must trim a turnout. I try to leave as many "box stock" as possible because it makes replacement so much easier if that is ever needed.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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