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Locomotive stopping on turnouts

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  • Member since
    June, 2015
  • 7 posts
Locomotive stopping on turnouts
Posted by pathman on Saturday, January 06, 2018 9:30 PM

I recently bought a Broadway Limited steam locomotive (DCC with sound) and it is stopping on several turnouts.  None of my other locomotives are doing this.  I've cleaned the track, soldered just about all the rail joiners, and added a few extra feeder wires, but that hasn't helped.  The two small wheels at the front of the locomotive are also derailing at several of the turnouts - again none of my other locomotives are doing this.  I'm using both Peco and Atlas insulated frog turnouts. Any advice on how to rectify this problem?  Thanks.

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Posted by railandsail on Monday, January 08, 2018 12:46 PM

What specific locomotive?

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Posted by NVSRR on Monday, January 08, 2018 1:02 PM

Which wheel is on the frog everytime it stops?   That is an electrical pickup issue in the engine   Most locos nowadays have all wheel electrical contact to overcome such problems   By identifing the wheel tht stops on the frog  tells you which one is getting power . It is usually good starting point to identify where to look in the engine for a broken or unconnected wire.

As for the derailing pilot,  either the wheels are out of gauge or the pilot truck can not move freely because of some hang up around the pivot point. Most likely a little flash or a wire( figuring the truck is wired for pickup)

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Posted by selector on Monday, January 08, 2018 2:41 PM

railandsail

What specific locomotive?

 

...and on which turnouts?  A large non-articulated steamer would have trouble with a snap switch #4.

Modern toy steamers have multiple pickup between their various driving wheels and the tender's wheels.  It should NOT stall on a turnout unless something is quite wrong.  Assuming the turnout is okay, since other locomotives seem to have little or no difficulty, we would wonder about the suitability of the match between that turnout and the locomotive in question.  That's why I asked my first question.

Apart from that, it is worth checking two things:

a. if the wheels on each axle are in gauge; and

b. if all the wheels touch the surface at the same time everywhere along your track system.  One way to check if the axles are all free to float a bit is to place the locomotive on a shiny flat surface.  All flanges should touch the surface.  A mirror is a good place to check if that is possible.

If that all checks out, you have intermittent wire contact somewhere, or faulty wiper contact at the axles/wheels. It only becomes a problem with the tender and locomotive bent a certain way.  It could also happen when the locomotive or tender runs through the turnout, especially if the frog is low or high and bumps the locomotive down or up.

One last possibility - the tether between the tender and locomotive is not fully seated, or flush across....one side sticks out more than the other.

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Posted by pathman on Monday, January 08, 2018 3:08 PM

Thanks - I'll check out the things you suggested.  It's the Broadway Limited 5381 2-8-0 Consolidation, ATSF #1965 with Paragon3 Sound/DC/DCC/Smoke/HO Scale.  It has the most problems on #4 turnouts, but doesn't seem to be a large locomotive compared to some I've seen.

https://www.broadway-limited.com/53812-8-0consolidationatsf1965paragon3sounddcdccsmokeho.aspx

 

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Posted by CGW121 on Monday, January 08, 2018 3:26 PM

I belong to a club, dcc code 83 Shinohara minimum @#6, we had one turnout that lots of different, It  locos would stop on. I ran a track cleaner over it and it stopped. It was NOT visibly dirty  nnr were there other problems. In another spot a turnont in a crossover had been ballasted. It was fine before that after we had proplems with hesitations at it. Glue insulated the contacts. Things to look ints.

 

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, January 08, 2018 10:26 PM

Peco turnouts in particular have a problem at the frogs.  The rails which come into the frog are sometimes too close.  When a metal wheel tread crosses the frog, sometimes the wheel bridges the gap at the frog, resulting in a short (as distinct from a stall.)  You can cure this by painting a short section of the frog with nail polish.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 7:12 AM

Peco INSULFROGS have this problem, Electrofrogs do not.

And I agree, this is more likely a short than a loss of power. Even a 2-8-0 plus tender is a far longer pickup wheelbase than the length of an entire #4 turnout, no way is it losing power, unless the pickups are bad on either the loco or tender, or the loco to tender connector is not fully plugged in.

                              --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by Medina1128 on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 7:24 AM

I was having the same problem with my BLI Blueline locomotives, until, after getting serious about troubleshooting the trouble spot, realized that the insulating gaps were cut in the wrong place, leaving a dead section of track (the turnout, itself). Use a multimeter to determine that you have continuity and no shorts through the turnout on both routes. If you find a dead spot, there's your problem. This will probably be either: 1) an insulated frog, or 2) an non-insulated one, with the polarity reversed.

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Posted by thomas81z on Saturday, January 13, 2018 10:28 AM

can you post up a pic for a visual aid :)

MisterBeasley

Peco turnouts in particular have a problem at the frogs.  The rails which come into the frog are sometimes too close.  When a metal wheel tread crosses the frog, sometimes the wheel bridges the gap at the frog, resulting in a short (as distinct from a stall.)  You can cure this by painting a short section of the frog with nail polish.

 

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  • From: Gateway City
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Posted by yankee flyer on Saturday, January 13, 2018 11:41 AM

I know this is going to sound dumb but I had a new loco that had simular problems.

After closer inspection I found a tiny piece of black foam on top of the the pilot. I guess it was put there to support the pilot while shipping.

Just an idea.

Good luck.

Lee

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