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SNSR Layout Build

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  • Member since
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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, July 16, 2020 10:46 PM

I bought a package of 110 lb. heavy paper (card stock?) a while ago. I intended to use it for making paper mock ups of scratchbuilt structures (for which it is excellent by the way) but I have also found that it is great for drawings that will be handled multiple times. It would be perfect for car cards and way bills.

I have an HP 7520 printer which handles the heavier card stock quite nicely. It will also print double sided without having to touch the paper.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Saturday, July 18, 2020 6:47 PM

hon30critter

I bought a package of 110 lb. heavy paper (card stock?) a while ago. I intended to use it for making paper mock ups of scratchbuilt structures (for which it is excellent by the way) but I have also found that it is great for drawings that will be handled multiple times. It would be perfect for car cards and way bills.

I have an HP 7520 printer which handles the heavier card stock quite nicely. It will also print double sided without having to touch the paper.

Dave

Hey Dave -

I'm using 65-pound card stock for both the folded pocket car cards and the slip-in waybills. I got some the other day from that Amazing Prime online retailer.

I searched that website, and the numbers were all over the place: 60-pound, 80-pound, 140-pound, 175 gpsm (grams per square meter), 273 gpsm, etc . . . even some odd gauge designations (regarding thickness, I suppose). Utterly confusing. You'd think there would be some correlation between pounds and gpsm, but there isn't. Also, it appears that poundage for card stock is different than poundage for cover stock.

Adding to the confusion is the official paper weight specs on the official HP printer technical support website. Completely unhelpful. The site says the max weight for my printer is 40-pound cover stock, which is about the specs for my company fancy letterhead.

The HP website also maintains a user forum as a source of helpful advice. No comment. Confused  Some users brag about ignoring the specs and using 120 pound stuff with no apparent issues . . .

Anyhow, I just took a wild guess and got a small 75-sheet pack for $6.99, including free 2-day shipping (five calendar days). Not too expensive in the overall scheme of things. I'm not too enthused about the idea of tossing away 74 sheets if necessary, but I'd be even less enthused about tossing away 249 sheets from a full pack.

The card stock is a little light, but I think it will serve the purpose, and it appears to feed smoothly. Plus, I can always find another use for it if it doesn't work out. Fold up paper buildings and intermodal containers come to mind . . .

Robert 

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Sunday, July 19, 2020 10:37 AM

Here're a couple of photos showing the car cards and waybills printed on 65-lb card stock. The first shows a full sheet of 12 waybills printed front and back (though only one side is visible in this photo, duh) with two cut out and flipped over. The second shows a full sheet of 6 car cards (front side only) with four cut out from a different sheet with two folded into position to form a pocket (though not yet taped).

Robert

EDIT  Looking at the image, I couldn't help but notice someone misspelled 'PLUG'. Dang!!

 

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, July 19, 2020 12:58 PM

ROBERT PETRICK
Looking at the image, I couldn't help but notice someone misspelled 'PLUG'. Dang!!

I actually mispelled a city once when I was decalling a freight car once. Dang!

Your card look great. Do you have somehing built into the side of the layout to hold them? Sorry if I missed the answer if you posted it earlier.

My printer said I had to change the settings for cardstock, but I never figured out how to do it. I just ran the cardstock through on normal paper seting, and had no problems.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Sunday, July 19, 2020 2:28 PM

SeeYou190

Do you have somehing built into the side of the layout to hold them? Sorry if I missed the answer if you posted it earlier.

-Kevin

 

Hey Kevin-

I'm doing all this stuff off-the-cuff and writing it up as I go along. But yes, I do have a plan for some sort of car card boxes, and I don't think I've mentioned it yet. I'm also working on an overall Operations Narrative. I'm not sure how I'm gonna post that because it is about two pages in MSWord format and includes some highlighting and bullet points. I'll figure it out later. Maybe a paragaph or two at a time with circles and arrows . . .

One issue I had in my previous limited operating experience on other model railroader's layouts was that the car card boxes stuck out into the (narrow) aisles and always drew a crowd around them.

My layout has wide aisles, so that will help a little, but I don't want the fascias to be too overloaded with stuff. Most of the card activity will occur on the lower level yard, but there will be several small boxes placed on the upper level in the vicinity of and within easy reach of the various yards and industries.

The boxes will not attach directly to the fascia, but will be be supported from the underside of of the benchwork and bolted (with large removable wingnuts) to the 2x4s that make up the major framework. I'll post photos and info on the design and construction of the boxes as I get there.

Thanks for your input.

Robert

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Sunday, July 19, 2020 7:39 PM

As mentioned in my previous post, this is an attempt to copy-and-paste the rough draft of my operation scheme. I don't know how this will show up on anyone's screen, and I realize that the narrative is a bit . . . umm . . . wordy, so I apologize in advance for any problems or inconvenience.

Operations Narrative and Jobs on the SNSR
 
North Shore Yard Yardmaster 
·         The North Shore Yard is front and center of the layout occupying the entire lower level and depicts typical operations of a deep-water port. From end to end (after straightening the folded dogbone), the yard is over 50 feet long and can store 275 cars without blocking the lead or any turnout and without encroaching on the mainline. Although situated in a port or harbor and scenicked as such, the yard can be used for more general sorting and classification operations. Activity in the lower yard is critical to successful operations of the Southern North Shore Railroad, and as such the Yardmaster has complete domain of all operations and car lading and movement within the yard limits as indicated in the layout plan and as demarcated on the layout.
·         The yardmaster may have one or two Assistant Yardmasters to aid in achieving the indicated results.
·         Based on orders and as directed by the Superintendent, the Yardmaster shall assemble and build up trains and prepare them to be dispatched to the upper level of the layout.
 Dispatcher 
·         Once trains leave the North Shore Yard, the Dispatcher shall direct all traffic and control all train movement on the layout. The layout is set up and wired to run both CTC and ABS signal and block control. All turnouts and switches can be thrown and/or closed remotely from the dispatcher’s panel and/or by handheld throttles and/or by momentary pushbuttons mounted on the fascia. JMRI software is installed on the laptop computer in the superintendent’s office and shall be utilized by the dispatcher to accomplish his duties. Interface between the laptop and layout is via Digitrax LocoNet cabling. 
Acme Chemical Complex Yardmaster 
Wind River Yardmaster 
Talleyrand Intermodal Yardmaster 
Brunswick Steel Yardmaster 
Mystic Mining and Materials (3M) Yardmaster 
Road and Yard Operating Crews 
·         All train crews shall consist of a Conductor and/or an Engineer. Each crew shall be assigned to trains by the Yardmaster and will be given a complete set of instructions and information (known as The Package) to help accomplish the work. Other, general information will also be provided to crews. Such information shall include: overall layout plan; yard configuration; track naming and numbering scheme; throttle, decoder, turnout, signal, and other electronic device instructions, etc. Small clipboards and pockets are available to help crews manage paperwork and whatnot.
·         All work shall be done in a competent, workmanlike manner and shall be completed on time as conditions and circumstances allow. Any deviation from the timetable or train orders shall be reported to the Dispatcher in a timely fashion and shall be rectified as soon as possible. 
Regularly Scheduled Trains 
·         All trains originate and terminate in the North Shore Yard and are dispatched and received by the Yardmaster or his designated assistant.
·         No train shall leave the yard without specific orders from the Yardmaster or Superintendent.
·         Morning Glory Express and Sunset Coast Limited are two daily first class manifest freight trains of between 25 and 35 cars each. Road power shall consist of two- or three-MU modern diesel locomotives of approximately 4000 HP apiece. Such as: C44-9, AC4400, SD-70Ace, SD-80/90, etc.
·         Coors Silver Bullet provides local freight service between the Coors Brewery (within the Acme Chemicals complex) and Western Grain and Sugar. Approximately three or four grain hoppers, three or four food-grade tankers, and two or three boxcars shall be dispatched daily and pulled by a single diesel locomotive, such as: GP-18, GP-35, SD-35, Dash8-40B, or the venerable SD-40.
·         Brunswick #1 and #2 are configured similar to the Coors Silver Bullet and provide daily service between Mystic Mining and Materials and the Brunswick Steel Mill, except that mineral hoppers and chemical tankers are used. In addition, regular service of loads and empties to and from the mine shall be transported in coal porters and shorty ore cars. Occasional trains will include bottom-dump gondolas and/or flat cars. Consists of about 10 to 12 cars shall be powered as mentioned above; longer consists might require MUed helper service; shorter consists of 3 or 4 cars might be pulled by smaller road switchers, such as RS-2 or SW1500.
·         Local Drayage and Turns shall be scheduled regularly on an ad hoc basis. SD-40s will get the bulk of this work, but other locomotives will be used as needed and as available. As mentioned above, short consists might be pulled by smaller road switchers.
·         Through Trains and Unit Trains shall be scheduled regularly, and will run all over the layout catch-as-catch-can at the discretion of the Conductor/Engineer and with direction and permission from the Dispatcher. These trains provide ever-changing visual kinetic scenery, and some can run unattended on continuous loops. Unit trains will include long coal drags (loaded or empty), double-stack intermodal traffic (loaded or empty), and passenger trains. Mixed freight trains can also be included in the category of through trains.
·         Periodic Unscheduled Trains,such as those needed for maintenance-of-way (MOW) or delivery of heavy equipment to the various industries, will run every now and then and utilize whatever power is available. 
Car Cards and Waybills 
·         Car Cards are provided for each and every locomotive and piece of rolling stock in the inventory. Information is stored in an Excel spreadsheet and printed onto sturdy card stock using AutoCAD. Detailed locomotive information is stored in the DecoderPro portion of JMRI, but skeleton information for locos is printed on small handheld cards similar to the info printed for all other railroad cars. Freight car cards (with folded pockets) are 4.25” by 2.15” and include pertinent information about the cars as well as a photo. Locomotive cards are the same size but without pockets. Locomotive cards can be quickly distinguished (in addition to the lack of pocket) by the photo at the top of the card; freight car cards have their photo along the bottom of the pocket.
·         Four-part Waybills are generated to provide (more or less) realistic forwarding of trains on the layout. All cars for all trains will be dispatched from the North Shore Yard only if they have an approved waybill for scheduled movement inserted in the car card pocket. As mentioned above, all traffic originates and terminates in the yard, and all trains will begin their journey with the waybill in the Number 1 position. As each leg is completed, the waybill with be rotated into the next position. NOTE: Waybills will be turned only after the previous car movement has been completely completed; most likely after all current operations have finished for the day.
·         In effect, there is only one Operating Session and it is continuous and indefinite. The nature of routing and car movement controlled by the waybills will allow any operator to cease any operation at any time and simply pick up the next ‘session’ wherever he left off the previous one.
·         Waybills are generated by the Superintendent and passed along to the Yardmaster, and trains are made up as necessary. The Superintendent has vast discretion to control all activity on the layout. The goal and purpose is to have traffic flow in an orderly (and pleasing) fashion. Another goal and purpose is to regulate the volume of railroad traffic to limit or enhance the density of rolling stock situated in the various industries and yards on the layout at any given time. If the Superintendent deems that there exists a sparsity of railroad cars on the layout, he can order trains that have a higher number of setouts and a lower number of pickups; if the reverse is true, and the layout appears to be a little too crowded and unworkable, the Superintendent can generate waybills to remove cars from the layout and send them to their final destination in the storage yard. The Superintendent can also generate waybills that order trains with a varying number of through cars so that plenty of trains run but the overall balance of cars on the layout is maintained.

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Monday, July 20, 2020 12:37 PM

Here's a sketch showing the lower level of the layout drawn to scale. The purpose of this exercise is to work out the official designations of the various features of the North Shore Yard so that my operations narrative and car cards and waybills can be worked out. The sketch shows the trackage as it is installed today using Kato Unitrack. There can be (and almost certainly will be) more iterations in the future.

The heavy line is the mainline and is designated as the Lower Main. It is 4.94 scale miles in length (including helix trackage) and is demarcated with mile posts as shown in green on the sketch. Mile Post 0.00 is at the turnout where the mainline diverges from the upper level.


The light lines are the various yard tracks. They are labeled with their official designation, and the number shown in red indicates the number of standard 65' cars that can be safely stored on each block of track. A few more could be stored, but I don't like the idea of things being so tight that coupler slack needs to be taken out to squeeze in one more car.


Mainline traffic can bypass the yard entirely. There are six points of access to the yard from the mainline (MP 2.08, MP 2.62, MP 2.93, MP 3.15, MP 3.52, and MP 4.94), and these points are labeled with Yard Limit signs to clearly demarcate the domain of the Yardmaster.

 

Robert

 

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Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 12:48 AM

ROBERT PETRICK
As mentioned in my previous post, this is an attempt to copy-and-paste the rough draft of my operation scheme. I don't know how this will show up on anyone's screen, and I realize that the narrative is a bit . . . umm . . . wordy, so I apologize in advance for any problems or inconvenience.

Hi Robert,

Your operations narrative shows up just fine on my desktop.

I am impressed by the amount of thought that you have put into your operations. My goal is to simply be able to run trains on my own layout. Formal operations are a distant thought. Perhaps I have that the wrong way around. You already have me thinking of how to add a separate yard as a wing on my layout.

Cheers!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Wednesday, July 22, 2020 12:50 AM

I've done a little work on the narrative. Mostly correcting place names and syntax, but I've also fleshed out the paragraph regarding locals and turns:

·         Local Drayage and Turns shall be scheduled regularly on an ad hoc basis. SD-40s will get the bulk of this work, but other locomotives will be used as needed and as available. As mentioned above, short consists might be pulled by smaller road switchers. For the most part, these jobs will use four-part waybills where only two routes are scheduled: swapping loads and empties back-and-forth between two matched industries on the layout. Repeat as often as desired. Many modelers do not like the idea of these forbidden industry pairs, but . . . oh well.
o    Coors Light ShuttleThree or four grain hoppers loaded with barley, corn, or hops going to the Coors Brewery from Western Grain and Sugar, with empties returning. Requires only three or four hoppers (empty hoppers and loaded hoppers look pretty much the same to the untrained eye).
o    Eisenbart TurnFour Bethgon coal porters and/or four shorty ore cars transporting loads to the Brunswick Steel Mill from Mystic Mine, and four empties making the return trip. Requires eight cars of each type (four each loaded, four each empty).
o    Green Apple Two-StepFour bulkhead flat cars loaded with either cordwood or long logs going to San Juan Pulp & Paper Mill and four empties making the return trip. Requires eight cars (four loaded, four empty). 
o    These jobs are perfect for when a guest shows up out of the blue and announces he can only stay a little while and doesn’t want to just stand around. Or, they’re perfect for newbies who are just getting the hang of things. They’re also perfect for members and guests who fidget with adult-onset ADD and who tend to chatter a lot unless you assign something meaningful for them to do. The Superintendent himself likes these jobs because it gives him a chance to get out on the layout and mingle with the guests without having to expend a lot of mental energy working out complicated switchlists.
 
 

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Wednesday, August 12, 2020 11:51 AM

A new scratchbuilding project. This one is inspired by another thread started by a new member. In that thread, the OP is looking for advice and info to accurately scratchbuild the power plant at a Cleveland Electric Generating Station in Ashtabula, Ohio. His plant is different, but similar in style and era. 

My project is in the very earliest stage of the scratchbuilding process: researching the prototype and making design decisions. I will try to update in real time as I go along.

This is the power plant at the Buffalo Bill Dam near Cody, Wyoming, just a little ways down the road from where I live.

Here're a coupla photos:

One thing I pointed out in that other thread is that these buildings would not look out of place on any college campus. Different era; different considerations regarding construction costs.

Robert

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Wednesday, August 12, 2020 2:32 PM

Following up my previous post. One of the first places to start research is Wikipedia; keeping in mind all the caveats associated with that site.

At the bottom of Wiki articles is a list of references and links. One such link lead me to this YouTube video:  Buffalo Bill Dam Video

With a firm belief in the Educational Fair Use principle, here are a few screen captures from that video.

Starting with the workers inside and estimating their height and weight and knowing that the handrails are 42" high, I can start working out the dimensions of the windows, and from that the overall dimensions of the building.

Just getting started. More to follow.

Robert

 

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Friday, August 14, 2020 12:15 PM

I estimated that the individual window panes of the cathedral windows are 15"x18", and from that got this: And from that, extrapolated to this:

Still a little rough and in its early incarnation, but something to work with.

Robert

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Saturday, August 15, 2020 6:15 PM

I cut out a few test pieces to see if this idea is gonna work.

 

It should work, but Holy Cow, we're gonna need a bunch of little 1:160 window washers to clean off all that fuzz!

 

Robert

 

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Monday, August 17, 2020 9:36 AM

Here's a photo of the base plane of the front wall for the Shoshone Power Plant. I usually don't call these things anything, but I suppose base plane is a reasonable descriptor. It is flat and unadorned and will serve as the base for the built-up wall section. The architectural details and fenestration, such as copings, corbels, cornices, pilasters, eaves, railings, balustrades, fascias, friezes, etc will be applied onto the top (front) of the plane. Other details, such as windows and depressed or incuse carvings, will be applied to the back of the plane. The goal is to end up with a tilt-up wall similar in nature to those found in commercial building kits. Four walls and a roof . . . voila.

 

Robert

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Monday, August 24, 2020 10:57 AM

The building has been partially assembled and I added the applique 'texture' details to the walls (pilasters, copings, and corbels, etc).

The joints need some work and there are some solvent weld splotches here and there, but some 600-grit sandpaper and maybe a little squadron putty will clean that up. 

Robert

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, August 24, 2020 11:28 AM

ROBERT PETRICK
The building has been partially assembled

Robert, that is incredible. Excellent work.

Please feel invited to share updates of this project in Weekend Photo Fun.

I hope to see more.

A+

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, August 24, 2020 12:21 PM

I wanted to look at the prototype and the model close together, so I combined portions of two of your posts. That is simply incredible workmanship. Bow

Rich

 

 

Alton Junction

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Monday, August 24, 2020 9:24 PM

Hey guys, thanks for the kind words.

Regarding Weekend Photo Fun . . . WPF is one of my favorite go-to threads. It always provides a lot of inspiration and encouragement, not to mention sheer enjoyment. But there is also a little intimidation. The photos posted there are great: great layouts, great modelers, great work.

I always feel a little uneasy when seeing wonderfully completed scenes fully detailed on fully scenicked mature layouts. I get that same sort of feeling when standing in front of the seventh grade geography class giving my book report and then discovering that I'm in my underwear. 

My layout is a coupla years old, and I've done a lot of work on it, but it is nowhere near complete. Not even close. I don't think there is even one square inch of the layout that could be classified as complete. I make a little progress every day, and things are moving along. It is starting to look reasonably good, and one day it might start looking pretty good; maybe even really good.

But for now, any photos I take will only show a work in progress, and photos of work in progress make me a little uncomfortable. I can see the fully completed structure or scene in my head, but the photos never match that image.

Nevertheless, per Kevin's suggestion, I will take my turn in the barrel and try to post photos to WPF showing what I'm working on, whatever state whatever project is in at the time. We'll see how it goes.

Robert 

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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, August 24, 2020 9:52 PM

ROBERT PETRICK
WPF is one of my favorite go-to threads. It always provides a lot of inspiration and encouragement, not to mention sheer enjoyment. But there is also a little intimidation. The photos posted there are great: great layouts, great modelers, great work.

Honestly Robert, I think you should rank yourself up there with the great modelers! Your creativity with modern cutting machinery is amazing. It does not matter that your layout is not complete. Your work is an inspiration!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, August 24, 2020 10:33 PM

Weekend Photo Fun is also for works in progress, layout updates, and new purchases. It is fun photographs being shared on the weekend.

What could be better?

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by BNSF UP and others modeler on Saturday, August 29, 2020 8:03 PM

hon30critter

 

 
ROBERT PETRICK
WPF is one of my favorite go-to threads. It always provides a lot of inspiration and encouragement, not to mention sheer enjoyment. But there is also a little intimidation. The photos posted there are great: great layouts, great modelers, great work.

 

Honestly Robert, I think you should rank yourself up there with the great modelers! Your creativity with modern cutting machinery is amazing. It does not matter that your layout is not complete. Your work is an inspiration!

Dave

 

+1

I'm beginning to realize that Windows 10 and sound decoders have a lot in common. There are so many things you have to change in order to get them to work the way you want.

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Posted by York1 on Saturday, August 29, 2020 8:07 PM

Robert, I'll second what the others have said.  I just started building my first layout two years ago  Nothing is finished, and the things I have built are nowhere near as nice as your stuff.

Given that, I still post things on WPF.  It's nice to get encouragement from people who have modeled a long time.

York1 John       

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Posted by SpaceMouse on Saturday, August 29, 2020 8:11 PM

hon30critter
Honestly Robert, I think you should rank yourself up there with the great modelers! Your creativity with modern cutting machinery is amazing. It does not matter that your layout is not complete. Your work is an inspiration! Dave

I totally agree. Well done.

Chip

Building the Rock Ridge Railroad with the slowest construction crew west of the Pecos.

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Wednesday, September 23, 2020 11:26 AM

Here's a photo showing the skeleton frame of the Tainter radial gate that goes at the top of the spillway of Boysen Dam in the Wind River Canyon peninsula. I may or may not (depending on how the paint job turns out) replace the 1/4" wood dowel trunnion with a short length of 1/4" ABS tube.

Recently, I've been scratchbuilding the turbine building for this vignette, and this item is part of Part B in that effort. Here are a coupla photos (posted a long time ago) of the rough draft blocked-out mocked-up scene, using cardboard and matboard and whatnot to set the stage. Since I started on the turbine building (pretty much out of sequence and not actually on my current agenda), I needed to get started on replacing the cardboard and pink foam with the more-or-less permanent construction in this area. I will add a few work-in-progress as-is photos to the next Weekend Photo Fun thread when it gets started.

Robert

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Saturday, October 3, 2020 12:25 PM

In this week's edition of WPF, I switched on the Way-Back Machine and posted a few photos of one of my first scratchbuilt buildings from 2010. The thing about nostalgia is that once you start taking the buggy ride down Memory Lane, it's kinda hard to stop. So, I'll try to just do this once and post some photos of the first long-span bridge I scratchbuilt (also in 2010).

This is a to-scale (completely uncompressed) N scale model of the Limeville Bridge over the Ohio River between Limeville, KY and Sciottoville, OH. The main span of the bridge is 1550 feet and there are approach spans on both sides of the river. That works out to 9'-8" for the main structure with 32" approach spans on the Kentucky side and 24" approach spans on the Ohio side. Overall length of 14'-4" from abutment to abutment.

Robert

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, October 3, 2020 1:39 PM

Robert, that bridge is simply amazing. You are truly finding the best ways to use the potential of N scale to capture the immence nature of the prototype. That is truly grand.

Bow

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Sunday, October 11, 2020 12:09 PM

When I design a building or structure, constructability is always a major consideration. No sense designing something that can't be built or something that I do not have the tools or the talent to assemble. In general, this means incorporating tabs and slots or ridges or pins or slots or dados or alignment marks or something to help assembly and to help insure that the parts go together properly or that parts can be held together in place long enough for the adhesive to set up.

The project at hand is fabricating and assembling concrete pipe stanchion piers to carry a pair of large irrigation water pipelines from the pumping plant at the base of the dam across an alcove of the Wind River and into a bored tunnel in the sheer rock wall of the canyon opposite. The materials used include gray 0.120" sheet acrylic, white 3/8" butylene tubing, and white 3/16" butylene tubing.

Here's a still life photo of the various pieces and parts in various stages of assembly. A completed stanchion stands (oddly enough) in the center. The large white tube will represent the 60" diameter water pipelines, and the small white tube has been sawn off like a hot dog or carrot into little stubby round pins that insert into the blind hole of one outer part and completely through the central part and into the blind hole of the other outer part. Trusty X-acto saw to the rear.

Robert

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