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Walthers Cornerstone Bascule Bridge-Final Photos

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Walthers Cornerstone Bascule Bridge-Final Photos
Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 7:30 AM

I have purchased a Walthers Cornerstone Bascule Bridge (933-3070), and I am preparing to begin assembly.

Does anyone that has the bridge built on their layout care to share photos?   It would be much appreciated. 

Also, any comments or advice on the construction of this bridge, including any difficulties encountered, would be welcome.

Rich

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Posted by woodman on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 8:08 AM

Rich,

 There is a video on U tube of it, just google Walthers Bascule Bridge.

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 8:35 AM

woodman

Rich,

 There is a video on U tube of it, just google Walthers Bascule Bridge.

woodman,

Thanks.  There are two videos of the bridge in motion, pretty cool.

That helped a lot to give me a good look at the assembled bridge and the various colors of the components.

Rich

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Posted by mobilman44 on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 9:57 AM

Rich,

I look forward to seeing your finished project!

 

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 12:25 PM

Yes I have built it.

The reed switch in the bridge building is worthless.  It's totally not reliable.  This is a common complaint.

There are several alternatives available.  A favorite is a single pole double throw pressure contact switch (microswitch) at the end of the bridge.  However you have to be careful to not raise the bridge too high.

http://www.surplustraders.net/a/0113.shtml

There are two metal pins which the bridge rotate around.  Don't force these through, as they will bend.  Widen the hole a little if you need to.

I can get you the downward auto stopping circuit if you need it rich.  I designed it myself

-D

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 3:25 PM

DigitalGriffin

Yes I have built it.

The reed switch in the bridge building is worthless.  It's totally not reliable.  This is a common complaint.

There are several alternatives available.  A favorite is a single pole double throw pressure contact switch (microswitch) at the end of the bridge.  However you have to be careful to not raise the bridge too high.

http://www.surplustraders.net/a/0113.shtml

There are two metal pins which the bridge rotate around.  Don't force these through, as they will bend.  Widen the hole a little if you need to.

I can get you the downward auto stopping circuit if you need it rich.  I designed it myself

http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g20/digital_griffin/ATT1270946.jpg

-D

DG,

Thanks for that photo.

I have read elsewhere that the reed switch is totally unreliable and that the early version used a 6 volt motor.  The later version uses a 12 volt motor and micro switches.

The fellow in this video worked up a more reliable 12 volt motor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMRde4RQ2pg&feature=related

Any help or advice with the circuit that you designed would be most appreciated.

Rich

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Posted by HobbyDr on Thursday, February 03, 2011 2:13 AM

I have it and it is the most maddening model I have ever built. They must have made two versions (mine had a micro switches, not reed) because in some steps, the parts didn't match up with the instructions. If you take your time, you can figure out how it should go. The thing that irked me the most was the prominent mold lines in the structural shapes. Many I was able to scrape off, but for a lot I cut thin pieces of styrene and covered them up. I'm fighting the flu, but I'll try to get downstairs and snap some pictures.

Don

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Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, February 03, 2011 5:55 AM

HobbyDr

I have it and it is the most maddening model I have ever built. They must have made two versions (mine had a micro switches, not reed) because in some steps, the parts didn't match up with the instructions. If you take your time, you can figure out how it should go. The thing that irked me the most was the prominent mold lines in the structural shapes. Many I was able to scrape off, but for a lot I cut thin pieces of styrene and covered them up. I'm fighting the flu, but I'll try to get downstairs and snap some pictures.

Don

Don,

Hope you feel better soon.  Thanks for the reply.  I look forward to your photos.

Yes, there were two releases on the Walthers Bascule Bridge.  I bought mine new from a dealer on eBay and now I am not sure if I have the early version or the later version.  So far, I have only opened the box and read through the instructions. So, I am not sure if I have the reed switches or the micro switches.

That was less than encouraging to read of your difficulties in assembling the bridge.  I will watch out for that problem.

I hope to have this bridge be an operating model.  It will be placed on a lift out section that crosses an aisle.  So, I need to learn more about the motor and the switches.  The two YouTube videos and text speak of differences between a 6 volt motor and a 12 volt motor and reed switches versus micro switches.  I have a learning curve facing me.

Rich

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Thursday, February 03, 2011 2:01 PM

The reed switch comes out of the motor house and extends to the right side bridge lift beam.  If you look inside the motor house it contains a circuit board with two diodes.  The reed switch sweeps across the surface of this board.

I have yet to see the microswitch model.  From the sounds of it, I hope you got the later edition.

It's really not that maddening.  This was like the 5th kit I put together, and I didn't have any real problems other than inserting the bridge pivot pins.

I have thought about redoing mine a second time, and inserting a "cam" on the side of the bridge, and hiding the switches with the bridge house.

If you want a closeup picture of any of the assemblies, let me know.

Don - Specializing in layout DC->DCC conversions

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Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, February 03, 2011 6:58 PM

DigitalGriffin

The reed switch comes out of the motor house and extends to the right side bridge lift beam.  If you look inside the motor house it contains a circuit board with two diodes.  The reed switch sweeps across the surface of this board.

I have yet to see the microswitch model.  From the sounds of it, I hope you got the later edition.

It's really not that maddening.  This was like the 5th kit I put together, and I didn't have any real problems other than inserting the bridge pivot pins.

I have thought about redoing mine a second time, and inserting a "cam" on the side of the bridge, and hiding the switches with the bridge house.

If you want a closeup picture of any of the assemblies, let me know.

DG,

Here are two photos of the motor with the reed switch showing on one photo and the two diodes showing in the other photo.

I am interested in how you integrated the motor into the bridge and what modifications, if any, you made to the electronic setup (e.g.micro switches, 12 volt motor, etc.).

Rich

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Posted by HobbyDr on Friday, February 04, 2011 9:31 AM

Rich, I didn't mean to discourage you. I'm someone who assembles models in the order that suits my whim. This model is one that absolutely, positively has to be built exactly in the order the instructions require. And this isn't a 'pick-up/put-down' project. Only start a step if you have the time to completely finish.  It just required a lot of concentration. It was a humbling, yet satisfying experience. Actually, it's not over. I had just finished the sub-asemblies when something came up, so I still have final-assembly and painting to do. Good Luck

 

Don

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Posted by richhotrain on Friday, February 04, 2011 10:09 AM

HobbyDr

Rich, I didn't mean to discourage you. I'm someone who assembles models in the order that suits my whim. This model is one that absolutely, positively has to be built exactly in the order the instructions require. And this isn't a 'pick-up/put-down' project. Only start a step if you have the time to completely finish.  It just required a lot of concentration. It was a humbling, yet satisfying experience. Actually, it's not over. I had just finished the sub-asemblies when something came up, so I still have final-assembly and painting to do. Good Luck

 

Don

Don,

Thanks for that.  I didn't find your comments discouraging at all.  I found them helpful because my reaction was too take my time and go at it in an organized manner.

I have built a lot of structures over the past seven years for my layout but never a bridge.

Ironically, I have two of the Walthers Cornerstone Double Truss Bridges, and they were the first two structures on my layout, but my wife volunteered to build them for me.  Maybe I should implore her to build this monster.

Rich

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Friday, February 04, 2011 2:33 PM

That would be the reed version, same as mine, sorry to report.

The circuit I set up is very very simple.  I took out the reed board and connected the wires directly to the moror.

Below is the circuit I may replace it with.  My original circuit just had 1 SPDT micro switch & 1 diode in parallel.  I put the microswitch at the far end of the bridge near the pier end cap.  When the bridge came down, it would press on the microswitch cutting current.  However reversing the current would still allow it to come up because of the diode.  In my original circuit, you would have to stop it manually once it reached the top.

If I were to do it again, I would use two of the micro switch circuits and a rotating cam attached to the side of the bridge pivot point.  That way it would stop when it reaches the top.  (See diagram below)

I'll get you photos of my circuit if you have any question.

 

 

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Friday, February 04, 2011 2:36 PM

Another thing, the motor mount plates are slide in place between 8 thin pegs which hold it there.  When I opened my kit up, two of the pegs snapped off.  I super glued mine back in place.  (Luckily they were still in the box)

 Oh and when it's finally assembled, it may not be completely flat at the four support points of the bridge.  My rocked a tad bit.  It was nothing a little sanding didn't take care of.  But it can get tricky when one of the legs you have to sand has the wire coming out of it.

 

Don - Specializing in layout DC->DCC conversions

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Posted by richhotrain on Saturday, February 05, 2011 5:52 AM

DG,

Thanks for that diagram and those comments. 

I plan to start assembly of the bascule bridge this coming week, and I will get back to you and all who are following this thread.

Rich

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Posted by ruderunner on Sunday, February 06, 2011 8:09 AM

I'll be following this thread as well since I'm in need of a bascule bridge for an area of my layout.  But I hadn't really considered the Walthers kit due to the long span.  But now that there's someone who has a kit and it's open perhaps you can answer a couple questions for me.

What is the footprint of the base?  And does it appear that the span can be shortened from the 21" that I've read it is?  I'd need 10-12" span.

PC, PennCentral or Plywood Contraption? Either way I'm modeling it...

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Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, February 06, 2011 10:21 PM

ruderunner

I'll be following this thread as well since I'm in need of a bascule bridge for an area of my layout.  But I hadn't really considered the Walthers kit due to the long span.  But now that there's someone who has a kit and it's open perhaps you can answer a couple questions for me.

What is the footprint of the base?  And does it appear that the span can be shortened from the 21" that I've read it is?  I'd need 10-12" span.

ruderunner.

Here are the dimensions:  Span=21.50", Approach=7.25",Counterweight=5.50".

So, the entire footprint is 34.25" in length.

It would appear that the only way to shorten the span would be to kitbash.

Rich

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Posted by ruderunner on Monday, February 07, 2011 6:26 AM

Wow that's truly huge. Way too big for what I need.  I guess I'll have to scratchbuild, UGH!

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Posted by HobbyDr on Monday, February 07, 2011 9:10 AM

ruderunner, before I scored the Cornerstone Bascule Bridge on e-Bay,  I was playing with two Walthers'  double-track truss bridges, figuring how to bash them into a bascule bridge. Very promising. If you get two of them, or two of the single-track version, I think you will be inspired.

Don

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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, February 07, 2011 4:11 PM

I started construction of the Walthers Cornerstone Bascule Bridge today.  It is not for the inexperienced or faint of heart.  I am using every form of weight and bracing known to man - - - and then some.

The instructions are awful.  Parts are mentioned by number in the text that do not appear on the instruction sheet diagrams.  Parts are illustrated and numbered on the instruction sheet but are not mentioned in the text of the instructions.   Some parts have duplicate numbers with other parts.  LOL

I am not worried because I have done enough of the Walthers Cornerstone kits to fee comfortable.  You just have to take it slow.

Like any bridge kit, there are several four sided parts, so to speak.  For example, the girder sides have matching outside and inside frameworks that must be glued together for both the left side and the right side of the bridge, then joined together.  So, I am painting parts as I go.  For Instance, the inside piece of each pair is getting painted while I can still reach it with a brush, allowed to dry, then glued to its mate.  I will paint the outside, top and bottom later.

There is also a little warpage on the track bed of all places but it too is fixable.  The other issue is with the counterweight.  It does not fit completely square, so I will use some epoxy to cover the gaps.  With sanding and painting, it will not be noticeable.

Walthers says to add 5 ounces of weight inside the counterweight.  Gee, thanks for including the 5 ounces of weight, not.

At some point, I will need to stop assembly and deal with the motor because that needs to be enclosed in the bridge house.  Digital Griffin, if you are reading this, I sent you a PM (Conversation) on your electrical diagram).

I will post some photos as I get further into the assembly process.

Rich

 

 

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Posted by zstripe on Tuesday, February 08, 2011 10:25 AM

RICH;

           In regards to the counter weight on the Bascule Bridge leave the hatch cover off the weight

          and after You have it on the Bridge take a funnel and add sand to it about half full. That is what

          I did to mine and it works perfect. I had it since they first came out.

 

                                                                                                            HAVE FUN FRANK

 

 

 

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Posted by topcopdoc on Tuesday, February 08, 2011 11:16 AM

Walther’s Cornerstone Bascule Bridge

I bought mine several years ago and it is still in the box. Thanks for the “heads up” on the construction problems.

 

Doc

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, February 08, 2011 1:41 PM

zstripe

RICH;

           In regards to the counter weight on the Bascule Bridge leave the hatch cover off the weight

          and after You have it on the Bridge take a funnel and add sand to it about half full. That is what

          I did to mine and it works perfect. I had it since they first came out.

 

                                                                                                            HAVE FUN FRANK

 

Frank,

Thanks,

I thought about doing just that, but this morning, I added 5 ounces of automobile wheel lead weights before sealing the counterweight.  The weights come with double faced tape, so it all worked pretty easily.  Then, I sealed that cap on that you are referring to.

Rich

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Posted by Cat on Tuesday, February 08, 2011 5:00 PM

ruderunner
What is the footprint of the base?  And does it appear that the span can be shortened from the 21" that I've read it is?  I'd need 10-12" span.

Hi, if you're not committed to it being a truss bridge, the old AHM Rolling Bridge is easy to convert longer or shorter since it's a plate bridge.  I got one off EBay a few years ago.  Actually, it's been packaged under various brands over the ages.

On the N scale model, the base tracks are 2 7/16" and the deck is 4 7/8"

http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&source=imghp&biw=1135&bih=651&q=ahm+rolling+bridge&gbv=2&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=

 

 

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Posted by New York&Long Branch on Tuesday, February 08, 2011 7:43 PM

Rich...

I feel your pain.  I kitbashed a couple of old AHM and Pola circa 1960s rolling lift bridges to get what I needed for my layout and it wasn't easy.  But I was determined to make it work and in the end, I think that it did (see below).

Yikes!  I have two more of these *** bridges to build on the layout.  I'm still engineering the motorized lift mechanism from under the layout for the first one...ect...ect...ect!

Anyway, good luck with the Walthers kit.  I think you'll come through with flying colors when all is said and done!

Jerry

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Posted by ruderunner on Wednesday, February 09, 2011 6:17 AM

Sorry Rich, I didn't intend to start a hijack!  Thanks for the advise guys but this is supposed to be a thread about the Walther bridge.

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, February 09, 2011 6:27 AM

ruderunner

Sorry Rich, I didn't intend to start a hijack!  Thanks for the advise guys but this is supposed to be a thread about the Walther bridge.

ruderunner,

This is outrageous, you Hijacker you. 

LOL

Just kidding. 

Actually, several replies have obviously responded sympathetically to your plight, and I find it all very interesting. 

When it comes to the subject of bridges, there is just not a lot of variety out there in available kits.  The Walthers Cornerstone Bascule Bridge is a good example, being retired and out of production for some years now, and very limited availability.

I am interested in eventually building a lift bridge like the PRR lift bridge over the south branch of the Chicago River here in Chicago.  To my knowledge no similar lift bridge is available, so I would have to scratch build this model. 

So, any comments or replies that are bridge related are fine with me.

Rich

 

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Posted by ruderunner on Thursday, February 10, 2011 6:34 AM

Rich, have you seen the lift bridge from CMR?  I intend to get one and have already figured out the placement on the layout.  It's kind of big but I won't be using the approach spans since the bridge I model has towers on shore, 16" span 28.75 with towers and a fair bit longer if you use the approaches.

The bascule on my layout will be right behind the lift bridge and slightly angled from it.  It will have to be a truss style.  If anyone has ever had Burning River ale it's pictured on the label, the upright girder thing in the picture.  Former B+O bridge.

For a short term fix I'll just use an Atlas or Bachman through truss bridge and figure out if one can be bashed into a bascule.  That way I can use the tracks and know that whatever I do build will install easily.  Function isn't an issue, heck the prototype hasn't been used in decades but it is still standing.

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Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, February 10, 2011 9:25 AM

ruderunner

Rich, have you seen the lift bridge from CMR?  I intend to get one and have already figured out the placement on the layout.  It's kind of big but I won't be using the approach spans since the bridge I model has towers on shore, 16" span 28.75 with towers and a fair bit longer if you use the approaches.

The bascule on my layout will be right behind the lift bridge and slightly angled from it.  It will have to be a truss style.  If anyone has ever had Burning River ale it's pictured on the label, the upright girder thing in the picture.  Former B+O bridge.

For a short term fix I'll just use an Atlas or Bachman through truss bridge and figure out if one can be bashed into a bascule.  That way I can use the tracks and know that whatever I do build will install easily.  Function isn't an issue, heck the prototype hasn't been used in decades but it is still standing.

ruderunner,

I had not seen that CMR lift bridge, but that is something to behold.  At $296, that is not cheap.

Here is a link:

http://www.custommodelrailroads.com/liftbridge-1.aspx

For those who are interested, once on the site, click on View More Images for a 7-photo display of the lift bridge.

Since I loosely model the area south of downtown Chicago as part of my layout, I now have to use all of my power of resistance to avoid making that purchase.  Thanks for nothing, ruderunner.  LOL

Scratchbuilding a smaller version of rhe Walthers Cornerstone Bascule Bridge should be possible.  Let us know if you decide to do it, ruderunner, and, of course, post photos.  If you like, I can scan the instruction sheets for the Walthers bascule bridge and email them to you.  You could use the parts illustrations to assist you in any scratchbuilding effort.

Rich

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Posted by ruderunner on Friday, February 11, 2011 6:16 AM

No it's not cheap but neither is the bascule bridge.  Interestingly they sell the bridge as single track but at least one picture shows double track, maybe for a few dollars morw they can kit one up that way?

As for scratchbuilding my bridge, I need to find the photos we took years ago.  Since I'm more concerned with appearance than function I won't have to be too concerned with actual dimensions and selective compression may get in the way anyhow. For the short term as long as my trains can cross the river I'll be happy.

PC, PennCentral or Plywood Contraption? Either way I'm modeling it...

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