Trains.com

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Just some pictures of all kind of Ho and N trees

27929 views
48 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Just some pictures of all kind of Ho and N trees
Posted by grove den on Wednesday, November 19, 2008 8:01 AM

Well ,I am totaly new overhere but not on in the "mrr forumworld".

 I am "addicted" to make modeltreessince I was infected with the mrrvirus since my 6th birthday...and  as a matter of fact I am now STILL trying to make some USA kind of firtrees.  They look nice but: I think they still look to "European".......Is the foliage to dense ?? or the color to green??. Or is the habitus to regular??

I a open to any comment about the "look of a USA firtree"( I kow there isn't such a thing but I a am not that satisfied with the ones I make right know)

here is a picture of the HO firtree( kind of Abies species)

Thank you in advance!

!firtree

detail:

close-up firtree

firtrees

 

As you can see I am indeed new overhere..pushed the button twice so 2 times the same post. Sorry about that!

 

  • Member since
    April 2007
  • From: Chippewa Falls, WI
  • 267 posts
Posted by MPRR on Wednesday, November 19, 2008 8:20 AM

I think the tree looks awesome!!! Maybe shorten the length of trunk below the full branches... Seems really long. Other then that, I'll take a few hundred of those.

Mike

Mike Captain in Charge AJP Logging RR
  • Member since
    June 2004
  • From: Orig: Tyler Texas. Lived in seven countries, now live in Sundown, Louisiana
  • 25,640 posts
Posted by jeffrey-wimberly on Wednesday, November 19, 2008 9:33 AM

 It's too clean under the trees. No deadfall and no needles matted up.

Running Bear, Sundown, Louisiana
          Joined June, 2004

Dr. Frankendiesel aka Scott Running Bear
Space Mouse for president!
15 year veteran fire fighter
Collector of Apple //e's
Running Bear Enterprises
History Channel Club life member.
beatus homo qui invenit sapientiam


  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Amish country Tenn.
  • 10,027 posts
Posted by loathar on Wednesday, November 19, 2008 10:17 AM

Wow!!I think they look GREAT! The bare trunk may be a little bit too long. It would be appreciated if you gave us a "how to" explanation of how you make those.
The big thing about trees here in the U.S. is you would see a few different kinds of trees along the railway. Forests aren't usually made up of only one kind of tree. All different sizes too.

  • Member since
    February 2005
  • From: Vancouver Island, BC
  • 22,796 posts
Posted by selector on Wednesday, November 19, 2008 12:02 PM

Jos, nice to see you posting over here...and welcome!!  What you show is a close approximation of a Balsam Fir, except not from the bottom of the branches downward...that is more like a Douglas Fir or a Western Red Cedar, perhaps a Sitka Spruce.

To be perfectly honest, the trees, as others have pointed out, are a bit thin in the trunk, especially near the base (by about 30%, I'd say), and there should be more of a taper to the branches...they should be smaller, but not in all cases, as one climbs up the trunk.  Also, the bared trunk, at the bottom, is too long.  Between the too-long length that is branchless and the thinness of the whole trunk, it indicates that your image shows a model...to me.

Also, there should be another six or seven dead branches, long ones, that curl downward a bit below the first foliated branches you show in your first picture.  That was observed above my post by another reader.

What amazes me is the excellent branches you have managed to produce.  If you can taper them toward the top, maybe darken the needles a bit, and add another four to six dead branches below them, you would have it 100%.

Congtratulations on your pursuit of the perfect Douglas Fir.  You, of all people, will do it, and we can only hope to benefit when you share your tachnique with us. Smile

-Crandell

  • Member since
    May 2006
  • From: Brisbane, Australia
  • 784 posts
Posted by mikelhh on Wednesday, November 19, 2008 3:33 PM

 Very impressive!! To my eye the foliage and trunk texture are great! I'd be proud to have them on my layout.

 

 Mike

Modelling the UK in 00, and New England - MEC, B&M, D&H and Guilford - in H0

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Wednesday, November 19, 2008 4:29 PM

Thanks a lot you all folks! Smile

This  is info I can and will   integrate in making some new better/more realistic trees in the future!

Thanks Selector for your kind words too!

To me it is important to that NOT ONLY the engines and cars and also the buildings  are super detailed and  exactly on scale ...also the scenery has to be, I think(!) , at/on the same level.

How do you say/ make clear this in english:" I hate it to see a beautiful detailed "Big Boy"loco besides  some botllebrush trees or a super made/modelled very detailed  trestle and just close to it some clumsy trees...Sad"

I realy do apreciate your input into this matter ,thanks again!This was/is my very  first effort to make such a tree. It is more a solitair tree/standing aloneagain HO and almost 7 inches long/tall

firtree

 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Amish country Tenn.
  • 10,027 posts
Posted by loathar on Wednesday, November 19, 2008 9:40 PM

PLEASE give us an explanation of how your making these little gems!Smile

A step by step with pictures would be wonderful!

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Thursday, November 20, 2008 3:13 AM

Ok, ok Tom...I will but first I have to make some pictures about "some missing parts" of the 'how to'

But here a small preview how I always, well almost, make/start with modelling each tree:

tree frame

tree frame

also this lombardy poplar was made with/in the same way...

lombardy poplar

 

Jeffrey: I know the erea under the trees is not like real but( like the small one with the firtrees) this is a "show"diorama made of styrofoam to plant easy and quick  , the trees I've made , for making pictures... so now it already seeded with many small/big  holes caused by the groundpins of the many trees...Whistling

 

Jos

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • 88 posts
Posted by denny99 on Thursday, November 20, 2008 7:23 AM

 Excellent trees! What are you using for foliage?

Denny Modeling the SP Coast Line in N scale in 1974
  • Member since
    November 2002
  • From: US
  • 4,587 posts
Posted by jacon12 on Thursday, November 20, 2008 8:16 AM

 Wow... wish I had about a hundred of those!  I think they're pretty darned good, and I too am waiting a 'how-to' make them.

Thanks for posting the photos.

Jarrell

 HO Scale DCC Modeler of 1950, give or take 30 years.
  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Thursday, November 20, 2008 8:32 AM

Danny and Jarrel THANKS !Smile

"Excellent trees! What are you using for foliage?" wrote Danny...

well simple: fine filterfibers they use to filter aquaria...cutted in very small parts( about max. 1/2 an inch!)
found some weeks ago brown fibers: called : "decotwister" and is a produkt used in the "flowerdecorationworld"...( actualy in many colors available) Do not know if it is common overthere on the other side of the grrreat pond?

filterfibers/decotwister

 

Jos

  • Member since
    June 2006
  • From: Sweden
  • 1,808 posts
Posted by Lillen on Thursday, November 20, 2008 9:02 AM

Awsome trees. Truly works of art.

 

One thing I've noticed about fir trees around here is that even pines have foliage down almost to the ground if they stand alone and get plenty of sun.

 

Once more, awsome awsome awsome.

 

Thanks for sharing and inspiring. 

 

 

Magnus

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus
  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Thursday, November 20, 2008 9:49 AM

Thank you too Magnus,

 About the tree I showed in the first posts..

It is "designed" as,a tree ,  one of the few left ,  that was NOT cut down in a forrest...so all the other ones around this one are gone/cut down... for some years ago...that is why it has  a long trunk with almost no branches. ( but indeed not enough dead branches! )

So overhere they grow too with the branches full with foliage  'till the ground .

Jos

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • 88 posts
Posted by denny99 on Thursday, November 20, 2008 10:07 AM

grove den
well simple: fine filterfibers they use to filter aquaria...cutted in very small parts( about max. 1/2 an inch!)
found some weeks ago brown fibers: called : "decotwister" and is a produkt used in the "flowerdecorationworld"...( actualy in many colors available) Do not know if it is common overthere on the other side of the grrreat pond?

 

 

I don't know if they are common in US. I am on your side of the great pond :)

Thanks for the answer, I'll try to take a look at a couple of shops here that may have it.

Denny Modeling the SP Coast Line in N scale in 1974
  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Thursday, November 20, 2008 11:28 AM

OOps Denny sorry...missed that!! he he lolBlindfold

Saronno...hmmmm ....sounds one or another way  familiar.....yes now I recognize the name:

verrrry famous overhere but I don't drink it that much..he he lolWhistling

Jos

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Friday, November 21, 2008 9:47 AM

here some other green stuff:

birchtrees:

Jos

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Amish country Tenn.
  • 10,027 posts
Posted by loathar on Friday, November 21, 2008 12:38 PM

What are you using on your armitures to get the bark effect? Are you dipping them in plaster or something like that? The "bark" is the most realistic looking I've ever seen! What colors and type of paint are you using?
Sorry for all the questions!Big Smile

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Friday, November 21, 2008 3:28 PM

Hi Loathar,

I made the bark ,again ,with sawdust. Just like I wrote in the thread about the firtrees: "If the primer was dry, I added the very fine MDF sawdust, with a theesieve,  on the trunk but first "painted it with a small long haired brush with the" mix"( white glue and some drops of dishdetergent and a litlle bit of water) Let it dry and paint the frame with , in my case, latexwallpaint in a color I found/bought cheap during a sale and just had the right color!
 Also  this time I collected the rough sawdust( with a sieve of course!) to use it as immitation of the texture of the lower parts of the birchtree.

The trick about this is: use a layer( sometimes 2) of black latex wallpaint when you've added a litlle bit of the rough ( MDF) sawdust over the already  dry layers of fine sawdust!

The latex wallpaint makes the texture of the "sharp"rough sawdust softer. If dry, you have/can drybrush it with a kind of ivory acryl color  and with a marker( black) draw some horizontal lines / spots on the trunk

birchtree Trunk

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Friday, November 21, 2008 3:45 PM

Here an other one made with fine and some rough sawdust covered with one or two layers of latexwall paint and dry brushed...

maple tree

Jos

 

  • Member since
    October 2006
  • 520 posts
Posted by Loco on Friday, November 21, 2008 7:54 PM

 Now them are some Birch'en trees!!!  hehehe  little humor there....

LAte Loco
  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Saturday, November 22, 2008 4:35 PM

Here the same tree but added the colored fibers and the small branches...

tree frame

Jos

  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Northeast OH
  • 2,260 posts
Posted by NeO6874 on Sunday, November 23, 2008 8:57 AM

 i dunno....

 

I think you're trying to pass off real trees as models...

-Dan

Builder of Bowser steam! Railimages Site

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: New Jersey, US
  • 379 posts
Posted by topcopdoc on Sunday, November 23, 2008 10:25 AM

Great trees! I especially like the different armatures you made for the different types of trees. Many modelers in the USA use twigs from natural plants and bushes as a beginning for trees and then sprinkle ground foam on the branches which are covered with glue or wet paint.

Doc 

Pennsylvania Railroad The Standard Railroad of the World
  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Monday, November 24, 2008 11:44 AM

 Many modelers in the USA use twigs from natural plants and bushes as a beginning for trees and then sprinkle ground foam on the branches which are covered with glue or wet paint.

well that is exactly what I did with this tree: some big roots and added smaller roots+ some poly fiber and some turf from WS...

Tree made out of roots

Jos

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: New Jersey
  • 82 posts
Posted by njtaxland on Monday, November 24, 2008 11:48 AM

wow they look fantastic, i would love to be able to create a tree like that in N scale how do you do it

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Monday, November 24, 2008 11:53 AM

Thanks Bruce!

If you look carefuly the preiserman is in Ncale...so here is a an example to duplicate! Wink

 

Jos

  • Member since
    February 2005
  • From: In the State of insanity!
  • 7,982 posts
Posted by pcarrell on Monday, November 24, 2008 3:26 PM

Great looking trees!

Looks like a poly fiber in those pics of the raw material.  They use that to fill pillows and stuff.

Philip
  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Brunssum, the Netherlands
  • 47 posts
Posted by grove den on Tuesday, November 25, 2008 2:40 PM

pcarrel :

Looks like a poly fiber in those pics of the raw material.  They use that to fill pillows and stuff.

 Philip thanks and yes it is a kind of poly fiber but NOT the ones used in pillows!

Those fibers are to thin for this purpose . I did experiment too with those kind of fibers but they were to thin to "carry"the turf ( Woodl. Sc.) or leaves from Noch.. so I still use the gardenpond/aquaria filterfibers as "carier"for the leaves..

 

Jos

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • 88 posts
Posted by denny99 on Tuesday, November 25, 2008 3:19 PM

 Jos,

 I am really impressed! The birches (my favorite trees) are simply awesome. And the leafless tree is incredibly close to the real thing. I would have said "real" if it wasn't in this thread :)

And, yes, my town is famous for the Amaretto Di Saronno liquor. Believe it or not, I never tried it! Sleepy

Denny Modeling the SP Coast Line in N scale in 1974

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!