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track laying on a steep slope

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  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 8, 2003 11:00 AM
As always there are different ways to solve a particular problem.

I have a 7 acre lot that is at the base of a mountain and there is not much of the surface that is level.

I built a retaiing wall of railroad ties and then "created" a flat area to place the layout. My initial layout has approximately 250 feet of track with 16 foot diameter circles at each end. At the center the layout is only 10 feet wide, but it is approximately 75 feet long. Email me at creilly@teampanels.com and I'll reply with some pictures.

By building a retaining wall up, you could get ahead of the sloop and then create a large area that is as flat as you wish it to be.

I have some suggestions to the design of the retaining wall if your interested.

Chuck Reilly
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 8, 2003 11:00 AM
As always there are different ways to solve a particular problem.

I have a 7 acre lot that is at the base of a mountain and there is not much of the surface that is level.

I built a retaiing wall of railroad ties and then "created" a flat area to place the layout. My initial layout has approximately 250 feet of track with 16 foot diameter circles at each end. At the center the layout is only 10 feet wide, but it is approximately 75 feet long. Email me at creilly@teampanels.com and I'll reply with some pictures.

By building a retaining wall up, you could get ahead of the sloop and then create a large area that is as flat as you wish it to be.

I have some suggestions to the design of the retaining wall if your interested.

Chuck Reilly
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 5, 2003 12:43 PM
Depending on what you want things to look like you can use alot of trestles or brick/stone work or fill the area in with soil and retaining walls. You could cut into what you have and use that soil to level things off. Its hard to recommend without seeing your space.
The short answer to your question about maximum grade is 5% grade. That is for example, a 5 inch drop or rise over a 100 inch stretch of track. It is not very steep for a train to climb as I have found out but anything more will be to fast coming down. Good luck and enjoy your trains.
pfd586
  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 5, 2003 12:43 PM
Depending on what you want things to look like you can use alot of trestles or brick/stone work or fill the area in with soil and retaining walls. You could cut into what you have and use that soil to level things off. Its hard to recommend without seeing your space.
The short answer to your question about maximum grade is 5% grade. That is for example, a 5 inch drop or rise over a 100 inch stretch of track. It is not very steep for a train to climb as I have found out but anything more will be to fast coming down. Good luck and enjoy your trains.
pfd586
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 2, 2003 6:19 PM
First, a caution: what is the slope comprised of? If, for instance, it's loose soil, or has a clay substrate, you should first concern yourself with stability. This includes you or others falling off the slope when it collapses beneath you. I've experienced this, and if you land on bolders, it isn't in the least bit funny.

Second, your description isn't sufficiently clear. Do you mean a four foot decrease in elevation along a 20 foot face of undefined slope? If so, what is the problem you're really facing?

Stuff that needs to be known:
1) an established baseline height (elevation); this should be used throughout your railroad.
2) the elevations and distances concerning you for this particular issue.
3) the cuts and fills needed to provide a working right of way.
4) soil/rock composition.
5) climatic extremes. (I have a creek that floods occasionally and washes out stuff.)
6) Type of running you're doing. A crack 1/32 express needs a smoother grade than a 1/24 geared logging loco.

In any case, everything you anticipate seems doable, and with additional information, I'd be glad to help. Can you email/post some digital pics of the site. Maybe borrow a camera to do so?

Best wishes,

-David
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 2, 2003 6:19 PM
First, a caution: what is the slope comprised of? If, for instance, it's loose soil, or has a clay substrate, you should first concern yourself with stability. This includes you or others falling off the slope when it collapses beneath you. I've experienced this, and if you land on bolders, it isn't in the least bit funny.

Second, your description isn't sufficiently clear. Do you mean a four foot decrease in elevation along a 20 foot face of undefined slope? If so, what is the problem you're really facing?

Stuff that needs to be known:
1) an established baseline height (elevation); this should be used throughout your railroad.
2) the elevations and distances concerning you for this particular issue.
3) the cuts and fills needed to provide a working right of way.
4) soil/rock composition.
5) climatic extremes. (I have a creek that floods occasionally and washes out stuff.)
6) Type of running you're doing. A crack 1/32 express needs a smoother grade than a 1/24 geared logging loco.

In any case, everything you anticipate seems doable, and with additional information, I'd be glad to help. Can you email/post some digital pics of the site. Maybe borrow a camera to do so?

Best wishes,

-David
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
track laying on a steep slope
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 1, 2003 1:48 PM
I am constucting a system in G scale on a slope with a 20 foot frontage and a 4 foot drop on a steep slope. What is the best , easiest method of bringing the track from above to below ? What is the maximum grade that one can use and still have good operation? Is there a resource that one to which one can refer that is an "all inclusive" guide to a project such as this?
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
track laying on a steep slope
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 1, 2003 1:48 PM
I am constucting a system in G scale on a slope with a 20 foot frontage and a 4 foot drop on a steep slope. What is the best , easiest method of bringing the track from above to below ? What is the maximum grade that one can use and still have good operation? Is there a resource that one to which one can refer that is an "all inclusive" guide to a project such as this?

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