Trains.com

Table Saw for miniature work.

5273 views
3 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Table Saw for miniature work.
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 8, 2003 2:52 PM
Anybody have a take on the $400 Poxxon table saw? Or the Microlux? Or would a regular $99 Ryobi 10" table saw with a fine blade work just as well on building G scale bridges and such. Thanks.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Table Saw for miniature work.
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 8, 2003 2:52 PM
Anybody have a take on the $400 Poxxon table saw? Or the Microlux? Or would a regular $99 Ryobi 10" table saw with a fine blade work just as well on building G scale bridges and such. Thanks.
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Watkinsville, GA
  • 2,214 posts
Posted by Roger Bielen on Friday, August 8, 2003 6:43 PM
I USED A 10" TABLE SAW TO RIP PINE INTO 1/4"x1/4" PLANKS FOR BUILDING AN O-GAUGE TRESTLE. USED A RAZOR SAW FOR CROSS CUTS. WHEN RIPPING BE CAREFUL, SAFETY GLASSES AND STAND TO THE SIDE, THE LEAST IMPERFECTION, KNOT, THE PIECE MAY COME BACK AT YOU.
Roger B.
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Watkinsville, GA
  • 2,214 posts
Posted by Roger Bielen on Friday, August 8, 2003 6:43 PM
I USED A 10" TABLE SAW TO RIP PINE INTO 1/4"x1/4" PLANKS FOR BUILDING AN O-GAUGE TRESTLE. USED A RAZOR SAW FOR CROSS CUTS. WHEN RIPPING BE CAREFUL, SAFETY GLASSES AND STAND TO THE SIDE, THE LEAST IMPERFECTION, KNOT, THE PIECE MAY COME BACK AT YOU.
Roger B.
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • 10 posts
Posted by m.horovitz on Monday, August 11, 2003 10:41 AM
I have a Craftsman 10" saw and a Proxxon 4" saw. The Craftsman is fine for doing work down to about 1/2". Below that I start getting a little nervous. Yes, the large saw with a fine blade will do small work, but it's overkill and, I feel, dangerous. With the little Proxxon saw, I'm quite comfortable cutting down to 1/16" (or less). It's a question of safety and of usung the right tool for the job.
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • 10 posts
Posted by m.horovitz on Monday, August 11, 2003 10:41 AM
I have a Craftsman 10" saw and a Proxxon 4" saw. The Craftsman is fine for doing work down to about 1/2". Below that I start getting a little nervous. Yes, the large saw with a fine blade will do small work, but it's overkill and, I feel, dangerous. With the little Proxxon saw, I'm quite comfortable cutting down to 1/16" (or less). It's a question of safety and of usung the right tool for the job.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 1:15 PM
I use a Porter Cable #3812 benchtop 10" table saw for fine work, down to 1/8 x 1/16" sections, BUT, I also have special jigs and sleds built for this small ripping, for safety's sake.....and use featherboards wherever needed.
Too fine a blade is no good for ripping...too much heat....blades like the Freud 80T and 60T are NOT for ripping, they are for smooth crosscutting.

It is critical that you make 'zero-clearance inserts' for each blade you use on the saw, so that thin sections don't get pulled into the blade slot...I make mine from maple.
My PC saw cost CDN$600 [+taxes] up here at HD....so that's about $400 USD.

A key element that makes all cheap table saws unsuitable is their lousy quality fences and miter gauges. I only use my old 10" Sears for rough work.

The PC has a very nice fence, smooth and easy to set in small increments.
Other similar saws are the Dewalt #DW744, and the Bosch#4000.
I like the horsepower of these 10" benchtop 'precision' saws, and believe you can cut safely on them if you are thoroughly familiar with table saw procedures.
regards \ Mike
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 1:15 PM
I use a Porter Cable #3812 benchtop 10" table saw for fine work, down to 1/8 x 1/16" sections, BUT, I also have special jigs and sleds built for this small ripping, for safety's sake.....and use featherboards wherever needed.
Too fine a blade is no good for ripping...too much heat....blades like the Freud 80T and 60T are NOT for ripping, they are for smooth crosscutting.

It is critical that you make 'zero-clearance inserts' for each blade you use on the saw, so that thin sections don't get pulled into the blade slot...I make mine from maple.
My PC saw cost CDN$600 [+taxes] up here at HD....so that's about $400 USD.

A key element that makes all cheap table saws unsuitable is their lousy quality fences and miter gauges. I only use my old 10" Sears for rough work.

The PC has a very nice fence, smooth and easy to set in small increments.
Other similar saws are the Dewalt #DW744, and the Bosch#4000.
I like the horsepower of these 10" benchtop 'precision' saws, and believe you can cut safely on them if you are thoroughly familiar with table saw procedures.
regards \ Mike

Search the Community

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Get the Garden Railways newsletter delivered to your inbox twice a month

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Garden Railways magazine. Please view our privacy policy