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If you could do one thing differently and rebuild

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  • Member since
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Posted by vsmith on Thursday, November 6, 2003 9:31 AM
Other

Make absolutly, positivly, 100 % damn sure without a shadow of a doubt that I would be able to USE the garden for a layout BEFORE I bought a whole bunch of G scale stuff...

I think everyone on the forum knows my story so I wont repeat it (Yeah!!!).

If I KNEW I would be restricted to indoors BEFORE I already had a bunch of stuff, I would probably have gone into On30 scale. Good sized detailed trains on cheap HO track. But I have a bunch of stuff, I really like being able to get details inside the cab and cars and buildings. So I'm sticking to large scale, even if my layout plan look smore like a "micro-layout" blown up to enormous proportions. I just wi***here was more stuff avalible at affordable prices.

   Have fun with your trains

  • Member since
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  • From: Smoggy L.A.
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Posted by vsmith on Thursday, November 6, 2003 9:31 AM
Other

Make absolutly, positivly, 100 % damn sure without a shadow of a doubt that I would be able to USE the garden for a layout BEFORE I bought a whole bunch of G scale stuff...

I think everyone on the forum knows my story so I wont repeat it (Yeah!!!).

If I KNEW I would be restricted to indoors BEFORE I already had a bunch of stuff, I would probably have gone into On30 scale. Good sized detailed trains on cheap HO track. But I have a bunch of stuff, I really like being able to get details inside the cab and cars and buildings. So I'm sticking to large scale, even if my layout plan look smore like a "micro-layout" blown up to enormous proportions. I just wi***here was more stuff avalible at affordable prices.

   Have fun with your trains

  • Member since
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  • From: Lancaster County
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Posted by markoles on Thursday, November 6, 2003 9:29 AM
I am about to build my third garden railroad. Considerations this time include human traffic as well as ease of maintenance. I eventually want to add a raised line for the purpose of running live steam, but that wiil probably have to come later...

Mark
  • Member since
    August 2002
  • From: Lancaster County
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Posted by markoles on Thursday, November 6, 2003 9:29 AM
I am about to build my third garden railroad. Considerations this time include human traffic as well as ease of maintenance. I eventually want to add a raised line for the purpose of running live steam, but that wiil probably have to come later...

Mark
  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 6, 2003 9:14 AM
I would have started with more track. I am running a simple oval layout on a reclaimed area of the backyard, a former 24ft above ground pool. This area has been expanded and covered with crushed red rock, I'm looking forward to "Manifest Destiney" expanding a long single line with return loop . Although small at this time I've learned lots so far, not a bad way to start......
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 6, 2003 9:14 AM
I would have started with more track. I am running a simple oval layout on a reclaimed area of the backyard, a former 24ft above ground pool. This area has been expanded and covered with crushed red rock, I'm looking forward to "Manifest Destiney" expanding a long single line with return loop . Although small at this time I've learned lots so far, not a bad way to start......
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, November 5, 2003 10:37 PM
If I didn't have so much time, money and sweat into my ten year old layout I would switch scales. Back when I started this addiction we call garden railroading 7/8 scale never occurred to me but now that I know about it I wish I were in that scale. I have always liked tramway style railways with their tiny locomotives and rolling stock.
To satisfy this interest I am building a small (20" X 46") portable "micro" layout in Gn15.
For those who arn't famillier with this size, it's 1/2 inch scale tramway style trains running on HO size track. To learn more about "micro" layouts go to...www.carendt.com
OLD DAD
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, November 5, 2003 10:37 PM
If I didn't have so much time, money and sweat into my ten year old layout I would switch scales. Back when I started this addiction we call garden railroading 7/8 scale never occurred to me but now that I know about it I wish I were in that scale. I have always liked tramway style railways with their tiny locomotives and rolling stock.
To satisfy this interest I am building a small (20" X 46") portable "micro" layout in Gn15.
For those who arn't famillier with this size, it's 1/2 inch scale tramway style trains running on HO size track. To learn more about "micro" layouts go to...www.carendt.com
OLD DAD
  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, October 11, 2003 11:10 PM
I would have included some turnouts and made it longer. I had alot of cutting and filling as well as carpentry to do to get what I have now. Without much more time and not really not too much more cash I could have gone off further across the back of my yard. However, being new to all this two springs ago and wanting to improve the look of my yard I ended up with what I have now. None of my short comings really haven't taken anything away from the enjoyment of the Gnome Garden Railway.

My advise is to do the most you can to start with. I really didn't use that theory. I really wasn't aware that this whole garden railroad thing is very addictive.

pfd586
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, October 11, 2003 11:10 PM
I would have included some turnouts and made it longer. I had alot of cutting and filling as well as carpentry to do to get what I have now. Without much more time and not really not too much more cash I could have gone off further across the back of my yard. However, being new to all this two springs ago and wanting to improve the look of my yard I ended up with what I have now. None of my short comings really haven't taken anything away from the enjoyment of the Gnome Garden Railway.

My advise is to do the most you can to start with. I really didn't use that theory. I really wasn't aware that this whole garden railroad thing is very addictive.

pfd586
  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 18, 2003 1:33 PM
Originally posted by rcl1930

I built my RR with the intention of actually OPERATING it in addition to traditonal loop "display" running. This requires getting into every location to move rolling stock.
I can't always get all the way into the sidings from the mainline without having operating problems because of the need for larger radius.

This is a really prototype problem! Just keep a couple of old flats or gons. around to use as "pusher" cars and operate like the big boys!
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 18, 2003 1:33 PM
Originally posted by rcl1930

I built my RR with the intention of actually OPERATING it in addition to traditonal loop "display" running. This requires getting into every location to move rolling stock.
I can't always get all the way into the sidings from the mainline without having operating problems because of the need for larger radius.

This is a really prototype problem! Just keep a couple of old flats or gons. around to use as "pusher" cars and operate like the big boys!
  • Member since
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  • From: US
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Posted by SandyR on Thursday, July 17, 2003 7:20 PM
I would build the right-of-way higher off the ground. I didn't think ahead back then; now I'm older and it's more of a struggle to maintain.
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Posted by SandyR on Thursday, July 17, 2003 7:20 PM
I would build the right-of-way higher off the ground. I didn't think ahead back then; now I'm older and it's more of a struggle to maintain.
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, July 16, 2003 7:06 PM
I would build my railroad up off the ground about 3 or 4 feet. This would make it easier to work on it and might keep the deer from walking across it.
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, July 16, 2003 7:06 PM
I would build my railroad up off the ground about 3 or 4 feet. This would make it easier to work on it and might keep the deer from walking across it.
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Posted by rcl1930 on Tuesday, July 15, 2003 12:14 PM
I built my RR with the intention of actually OPERATING it in addition to traditonal loop "display" running. This requires getting into every location to move rolling stock.


My mainline is based on 5 foot radius, including Aristo 5 foot radius "wide" turnouts for passing sidings. The turnouts to industrial sidings mostly are the original sharp 2 foot radius turnouts. With the arrival of larger minimum radius locomotives, and longer freight cars, I can't always get all the way into the sidings from the mainline without having operating problems because of the need for larger radius.

Now I am upgrading the mainline turnouts for industrial sidings from the 2 foot to the 5 foot wide radius turnouts so I can run some of the larger engines into the sidings. I still plan on using the old 2 foot turnouts beyond that point since I do have them. I may have to use extra freight cars to run though those sharp turnouts if I am to reach the end of the siding without being able to run the bigger minimum radius engies over those turnouts.

Rich L

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Posted by rcl1930 on Tuesday, July 15, 2003 12:14 PM
I built my RR with the intention of actually OPERATING it in addition to traditonal loop "display" running. This requires getting into every location to move rolling stock.


My mainline is based on 5 foot radius, including Aristo 5 foot radius "wide" turnouts for passing sidings. The turnouts to industrial sidings mostly are the original sharp 2 foot radius turnouts. With the arrival of larger minimum radius locomotives, and longer freight cars, I can't always get all the way into the sidings from the mainline without having operating problems because of the need for larger radius.

Now I am upgrading the mainline turnouts for industrial sidings from the 2 foot to the 5 foot wide radius turnouts so I can run some of the larger engines into the sidings. I still plan on using the old 2 foot turnouts beyond that point since I do have them. I may have to use extra freight cars to run though those sharp turnouts if I am to reach the end of the siding without being able to run the bigger minimum radius engies over those turnouts.

Rich L

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  • From: ENGLAND
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Posted by tonyd on Monday, July 14, 2003 12:28 PM
go with oo it would give me more scope due to cost as recently became disabled
tonyd
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Posted by tonyd on Monday, July 14, 2003 12:28 PM
go with oo it would give me more scope due to cost as recently became disabled
tonyd
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 11, 2003 11:59 PM
I would have made it bigger and spent much more time planning it.
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 11, 2003 11:59 PM
I would have made it bigger and spent much more time planning it.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 11, 2003 3:40 PM
Friend has a Bachmann old style 10 wheeler set. Got her to buy brass rail so it would run better. Then I started buying rolling stock. Got some 1/29 Aristo cabooses,etc. Then Bachmann came out with their 1:20.3 Ely Thomas Shay and changed my whole outlook. Kitbashed a reefer, box and stockcar to 1:20.3 proportions by widening and getting the proper size trucks from Hartman. Now everything is 1:20.3 kits from Fall River or Hartman and have three 1:20.3 Bachmann engines, two Shays and a Connie.
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 11, 2003 3:40 PM
Friend has a Bachmann old style 10 wheeler set. Got her to buy brass rail so it would run better. Then I started buying rolling stock. Got some 1/29 Aristo cabooses,etc. Then Bachmann came out with their 1:20.3 Ely Thomas Shay and changed my whole outlook. Kitbashed a reefer, box and stockcar to 1:20.3 proportions by widening and getting the proper size trucks from Hartman. Now everything is 1:20.3 kits from Fall River or Hartman and have three 1:20.3 Bachmann engines, two Shays and a Connie.
  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 11, 2003 11:54 AM
just completed the new expansion... and still have much work to go. so making changes, i work on lthe computer CAD program first to see if they can be realistic and then consider cost and practicality to the railroad
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 11, 2003 11:54 AM
just completed the new expansion... and still have much work to go. so making changes, i work on lthe computer CAD program first to see if they can be realistic and then consider cost and practicality to the railroad
  • Member since
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  • From: USA
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If you could do one thing differently and rebuild
Posted by Admin on Friday, July 11, 2003 9:49 AM
...what would you do differently? Why would you do this differently?
  • Member since
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  • From: USA
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If you could do one thing differently and rebuild
Posted by Admin on Friday, July 11, 2003 9:49 AM
...what would you do differently? Why would you do this differently?

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