Trains.com

wood for trestles and tunnel portals?

5314 views
20 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
wood for trestles and tunnel portals?
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, November 6, 2002 11:11 AM
I am looking for wood to construct a G gauge trestle and tunnel portals for a garden RR. I am looking for, pressure treated wood, cedar or other. I've been to Loews/Home Depot and can only find 1x2 and 2x2 pieces. I want 1x1 pieces. Must I buy one of the above and have them ripped to size? Is there something that would be available at a garden supply center?

Thanks!
Pete
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 14, 2002 1:43 PM
I would suggest Redwood. Purchase a larger 4x8 or 6x6 then rip it into smaller pieces. Redwood will hold up fantastically and will weather to a nice dark brown if wanted. Should probably still weather-proof it with some wood stain or something.

James
  • Member since
    January 2002
  • 2 posts
Posted by rogers2 on Wednesday, July 16, 2003 7:52 PM
I used short cedar boards from old garden planters and seemed to work fine.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, July 17, 2003 3:03 PM
or if you look in the dowel section you can see small square dowels. sure, there cheep but they work. i use them on all my buildings :)
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: AU
  • 77 posts
Posted by DannyS on Thursday, July 17, 2003 3:34 PM
Here in Australia we can purchase from hardware stores a plantation timber from Malaysia called Miranti, this comes in good sizes for trestles etc, (12mm=1/2 inch and 19mm=3/4 inch) in lengths of 2.4 metre( 8 foot), once painted with Creosote is extremely weatherproof. I have used this timber extensively on my garden railway for trestles and bridges and tunnel portals etc. (I think I have read that Creosote is now banned In US, perhaps you would have a substitute weather proofer!)
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 25, 2003 5:46 PM
Creosote has been banned in the US for a while now. Also, please be careful of the pressure treated wood called CCA. When you cut it you must wear a mask, otherwise you will inhale the product used to treat the wood which isn't good. One of the "C"s in CCA is cyanurite, a form or cyanide. Families have been found dead/poisoned after an unsuspecting homeowner used CCA scraps in his home stove.

JP
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • 10 posts
Posted by m.horovitz on Monday, July 28, 2003 10:12 PM
I, too, would vote for redwood. Look for straight, tight grain. I usually buy 1 x 4s or 1 x 6s and cut my wood from those. At our local lumber yards, I can usually score two or three suitable boards from everything in stock. Good wood is hard to find.

If you are thinking about doing much building, I'd also suggest that you consider getting (and learning to use) a table saw, which is the garden railroader's most valuable tool.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 6:27 PM
Does anyone use Juniper wood, I was given quite a bit to build a tressle out of and am curious if anyone has used it on their own layouts.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, August 9, 2003 8:42 AM
try using redwood look great!!!!!!
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 14, 2003 1:57 AM
I cut my own Cedar on a 10" tablesaw, I also cut crossties from heart Mississippi pine and then use my own form of creosote to weather protect them. current project is a pivot bridge and i am thinking of using Stainless steel.

Stephen
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 18, 2003 10:40 PM
Another good wood for outdoor use is cypress, if you can get it in your local area.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 26, 2003 3:44 PM
The Cedar, Cypress and Redwood all sound like good ideas if you want to scratch build. There are of course several pre-fab kits available thru various sources that provide pre-cut and ready for assembly models in a varity of styles.

You can find the source to several of these on the 'Steam In The Garden" site at:
http://www.steamup.com/

Regards,

LDH
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, August 30, 2003 9:37 PM
Anybody tried Teak?
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, August 31, 2003 3:39 PM
I have worked with teak a little on some woodworking projects. I am not sure about it for 'in the dirt' applications, but I can tell you it is hard on tools and blates.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 11:46 AM
Some garden supplies stores carry Redwood plant steaks 1/2" X 1/2" X 48" at very reasonable prices. You should treat them with a wood preserver as they will have a lot of the white pith wood in them which is less rot resistant than the red pith. Speaking of table saws, a small band saw is much safer to use than a table saw. Check your local Home Desperate, they usually have 8" Royob band sawa on sale for less than $100.00. Also check with Harbor Freight.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 10:19 AM
Also take a look at: http://www.rockcreeksouthern.com

This fellow posted on the "Sharing A Website" thread here. His Trestles are all scratch and he shows his methods in well taken photos.

LDH
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, October 11, 2003 10:35 PM
You might consider using the artificial wood they are now using in "wood" decks
here in always wet Oregon. The material is expensive, but you can rip it to the
size you need and is supposedly will last forever. Most are made of an epoxy resin
with some wood fiber.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 12, 2003 7:29 AM
I found a Cypress garden trellis at Lowes for less than $10. I took it apart and have 3 pieces 5/8 x 7/8 x6'
2ea 3/8 x7x8 x 28"
3ea 38 x 7x8 x 21" and
4ea 3/8 x 7/8 12"

Might be a little pricey this way but LOwes and Home Depot here have no redwood and very pricey cedar for use.

Wally
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 10:47 AM
A good place to get lumber supplies per cut to scale size. Not to use size but to small strip long lengths, is www.garendtextures.com. They have a large selection of structures as well as scratch building supplies available.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 25, 2003 6:20 PM
Pete, being a carpenter for fourteen years here is what I know.
Best to less disireble
1. redwood - Hard to find late fall do to logging season
2. cedar- easier to find Home depot /Lowes
3. White Oak - Not red oak has to due with cells in wood. Whites less common unless you find hardwood floor that can be milled.
4. Pressure treated - good if you don't mind it warping or twisting - look at any fence post there all twisted. P.T. is made from yellow pine great for home structure but for a model Pine being of spruce/ fir with exterior stain would be better. I'm from Ohio where the weather goes from one extreme to another. I' sure there are other species of would that would work but cost and availability are also a factor.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 25, 2003 6:51 PM
Hmm, carpenter matt, do you work with wood by chance?[;)] Yes, I have opted for redwood on the bridge I'm building to go over my river and it should be done in a few weeks if all goes well. it does, however, take a year or so for the wood to weather to where you want it to look like. But redwood is your friend.

Search the Community

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Get the Garden Railways newsletter delivered to your inbox twice a month

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Garden Railways magazine. Please view our privacy policy