smoke stack tube

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smoke stack tube
Posted by chocho willy on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 7:51 AM

anyone have any idea what the small tube behind the smoke stack parallel to the stack is, example LGB's Spreewald, seen them on several engines both american and european. Perhaps a light for nite use to see the color of the smoke to be able to adjust the burn?

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Posted by chocho willy on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 12:07 PM

chocho willy

anyone have any idea what the small tube behind the smoke stack parallel to the stack is, example LGB's Spreewald, seen them on several engines both american and european. Perhaps a light for nite use to see the color of the smoke to be able to adjust the burn?

 

after further research I believe it is the exhause stack for steam generator

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Posted by wheelman on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 3:39 PM

This tube is the exhaust for the air pump on many locomotives. To verify, try tracing the line back to its source on a photo of the prototype.

Wayne

Wayne

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Posted by Greg Elmassian on Thursday, May 25, 2017 10:42 AM

Sure looks like air pump exhaust, see what you think from this picture:

 

Sure looks like it connects to the upper "cylinder" of the air pump. Wonder why they would exhaust up there? Just to get the steam out of the way?

 

Greg

Visit my site: http://www.elmassian.com - lots of tips on locos, rolling stock and more.

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Posted by ttrigg on Thursday, May 25, 2017 3:53 PM

A few years back I was at a steam show, in Vista CA. I was talking to the owner of a steam tractor and asked about a secondary exhaust pipe alongside the main smoke stack. He told me that the steam exhaust pipe provided back pressure for the air pump to help control air pump speed. He explained that if the exhaust as vented at the pump the instant release of pressure would set up pulsing vibration within the pump which would produce uneven air pressure flow. Not sure about the accurancy of his statement, but it made sense to me.

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Posted by Greg Elmassian on Thursday, May 25, 2017 9:49 PM

Wow, learned something new, and it does make sense!

 

Greg

Visit my site: http://www.elmassian.com - lots of tips on locos, rolling stock and more.

 Click here for Greg's web site

 

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