Brand-new, interested in 1:32 scale

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Brand-new, interested in 1:32 scale
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, April 07, 2008 12:37 PM
Hi there. I'm new here. The only model train I've had so far is a small N-scale set. I've recently been looking into making a garden railway. I'm most interested in doing things in 1:32 scale, which seems to be extremely hard to find. It seems the new MTH RailKing is in this size... but it's hard to find accessories or plans of that scale. Anyone have any references they can recommend? Also, which other scales will work with 1:32--in case I need to mix-and-match? I don't want anything that looks out-of-proportion.
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Posted by vsmith on Monday, April 07, 2008 12:46 PM

Sign - Welcome [#welcome]

For 1/32 scale your kinda limited, 1/29 has become the defacto "standard" guage. MTH and Accucraft both make offering in 1/32, but Accu is very pricey, MTH is more affordable and they do have a very good reputation among their users. MDC used to offer freight cars in 1/32 and can still be found on Ebay from time to time. Based on MTHs product list I suspect one could create a sizable fleet of engines and cars just by using their current offerings, but if you dont like what they are offering, that complicates it a bit. I guess it depends on how many engines you wanted eventually and how deep your pockets are. Some people only have one engine and a string of cars and are as happy as can be, while others can have dozens of engines and cars. Thats the best I can offer, hopefully some more standard gauge guys can chime in with some advice.

   Have fun with your trains

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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, April 07, 2008 12:49 PM

Sign - Welcome [#welcome] "I don't want anything that looks out-of-proportion." Sweetheart it is all in a 10' rule. If it looks fine at 10' then it would look ok.

There is much out there. Go and look at a railway yard and notice the tallness of different cars, so there is a differance of proportion.

Many will post and will help you. Good Luck in G Gauge!

Toadster

 

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Posted by two tone on Monday, April 07, 2008 1:20 PM
Hi SongMomSign - Welcome [#welcome], A lot of people use 1.20.5. This is a good size to use Always remember the bigger the loco  the bigger the curves need to be And if you are having tunnels on your layout make sure that they are wide enough and tall as well. As Toad said many will help add a rough guide as to ware you are the the world and you may find some one is just around the blockSmile [:)]

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Posted by altterrain on Monday, April 07, 2008 1:38 PM

Going with only 1:32 will strickly limit you. There is a much greater range of offerings in the 1:29 scale range from Aristo, USA Trains and AMS. You can mix 1:29 and 1:32 but the size difference is noticeable. Many 1:24 accessories look good with the 1:29 scale trains.

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Posted by EMPIRE II LINE on Monday, April 07, 2008 1:43 PM

 SongMom wrote:
Hi there. I'm new here. The only model train I've had so far is a small N-scale set. I've recently been looking into making a garden railway. I'm most interested in doing things in 1:32 scale, which seems to be extremely hard to find.

 

 

Hi SongMom,

Likewise--Sign - Welcome [#welcome], I was just curious, is there a particular reason why you have chosen the 1/32 scale ??

That does limit your choice of pre-made/manufactured equipment....I might mention that die-cast models by 1st Gear are all in 1/32 scale, and they seem to have quite a nice selection of trucks and cars, there are others also in 1/32 scale. 

As already mentioned most things train are in the 1/29 scale, however the track width is actually at 1/32 scale for gauge one track, but not the 332MM height rail though, more like the 250 MM rail is to scale. 

You are gonna make it a bit harder/limiting on yourself in that scale though, but that is why it's called modeling, and you don't say but, Do you actually build alot of your own "N" scale models already?

Most importantly have fun doing it.....

Byron 

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Posted by enginear on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 10:44 AM

I run 1/32 scale MTH engines and rolling stock right with other manufacturers 1/29 scale. The coal cars I already had purchased look great to me (USA and aristo) with mth's version. I run tank cars, box cars,hoppers, etc. from all as well. Certain cars may oversize the smaller engines like passenger cars do but I don't own any yet. The couplers from different manufacturers is my biggest problem as they don't intermix well. I began switching my usa products to kadee couplers.

I don't have references to any plans, track plans or accessories yet but I keep watching for future releases. I guess you'll decide what you will accept as realistic and the detail on MTH 1/32 cars and engines is great considering the price (value). Look at their tank cars,engines and coal cars, and tell me if they meet your ideals. They will run on tighter radius than say maybe the USA modern tankers and covered hoppers I own. I RUN BOTH!!!!

if I missed anything or could help you with more please ask.

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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 12:00 PM
Thanks, guys! I know I'm limiting myself with this specific scale... I wanted to try it 'cuz I've got model horses in that scale. Just an idea I had and thought I might try... : )

I'm actually quite happy with what I've seen with MTH's cars. Their prices seem fairly reasonable, too. They don't seem to have a lot of steam engines, though. I want to go for the "classic", old-time look. I think I'd probably be happy w/ just a passenger train and one freight train. : )

The biggest challenge I can see is with the accessories. It looks like I'll have to scratch-build my buildings if I really want them to be in scale. I may have to settle for a "close enough" when it comes to human figures.

One other thing... I find lots of times when I look at ads, they don't specifically list the scale. Do I just need to "know" what sizes specific manufactures generally make their stuff in? I suppose they're just trying to save space in the ads, but it sure would be nice if they had a scale listed w/each piece... or at least put something like "all trains on this page are in (such-and-such) scale."

I should add that I'm extremely limited in local stores where I can buy large-scale trains (I know of maybe one), so I can't really see them in person. So it's not like I can see a 1:29 car next to a 1:32 car and see how well they match (whether one greatly outsizes the other).
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Posted by vsmith on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 1:33 PM

While buildings in 1/32 are kinda rare, try military armor modelers, the nuts that model tanks and such, they have TONS of detail stuff in 1/32, might be able to find a few correct building kits as well.

European suppliers might also be a source as 1/32 is more common over there.

Most LGB-PIKO-POLA kits should be OK if a tad large next to 1/32, the secret is not to buy little buildings or country buildings as they seam to be closer to 1/22.5 but the more urban buildings seam to be 'shrunk' so they are not so big, compared to the more rural building kits they look like they would work well in a 1/32 scale layout. Good Luck.

   Have fun with your trains

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Posted by altterrain on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 2:09 PM

Many of the people and ceramic buildings (lemax, dept.56, etc) that you see in craft shops and the home depot at holiday time will work with 1:32 scale.

-Brian

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Posted by enginear on Friday, April 18, 2008 9:05 AM

Sorry about the delay. I am not sure where you live. For others, I usually drive to Ridge road station in Holley, NY to see the products in person. They have a lot to see on display. I just was in Niagara Hobby in Buffalo, NY yesterday, and they have expanded their selection of G scale in stock. I saw that they are now carrying MTH G scale cars, as well as most of the accessories by Aristo, LGB, and model power (lights and signals). They had more brass Aristo track as well. some pictures to help:

MTH on top vs USA

MTH, Aristo, than USA on track in order

MTH on left, USA rear track, Aristo on right

usa left, mth right (not my picture)

I wanted to tell you also that my usa 1/29 auto cariers came with 1/24 scale cars? I now look at scale more closely. I'm thinking of building all my own structures. I've purchased a few mth 1/32 people to match. I could take more pictures if you need anything specific?

 

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Posted by altterrain on Friday, April 18, 2008 10:53 AM

Speaking of Rdge Road, I saw they had 5 different Piko 1:32 scale buildings listed on their site -

http://www.ridgeroadstation.com/istar.asp?a=3&manufacturer=373&dept=trains&class=1/32&subclass=BLDG

-Brian 

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Posted by Capt Bob Johnson on Friday, April 18, 2008 6:59 PM

As a couple of folk have already mentioned, it would be helpful for you to go back and add to your profile to give some indication of your locale!  Don't (for safety's sake) be too exacting; but a rough idea or general location will be quite helpful in answering questions.   Something like San Francicso, or Southern Illinois will work well.

What may work in the mid atlantic area may not be a good answer for the desert Southwest!   The elements in the Frozen tundra of Wisconsin are vastly different than what you'd have to deal with in sub-tropical parts of Florida!   That's why people are already asking!

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Posted by DSchmitt on Friday, April 18, 2008 7:33 PM
 vsmith wrote:

While buildings in 1/32 are kinda rare, try military armor modelers, the nuts that model tanks and such, they have TONS of detail stuff in 1/32, might be able to find a few correct building kits as well.

European suppliers might also be a source as 1/32 is more common over there.

Most LGB-PIKO-POLA kits should be OK if a tad large next to 1/32, the secret is not to buy little buildings or country buildings as they seam to be closer to 1/22.5 but the more urban buildings seam to be 'shrunk' so they are not so big, compared to the more rural building kits they look like they would work well in a 1/32 scale layout. Good Luck.

 

Actually most military models near that size are 1/35 scale, although some 1/32 scale is available.  There are a lot of civilian autos and light trucks in 1/32 scale diecast.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Here is a company that has 1/32 scale World War 1 narrow gauge military railroad equipment. 

http://www.scalelink.co.uk/acatalog/index.html

 

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Posted by Marty Cozad on Saturday, April 19, 2008 8:06 AM

When comparing hopper cars, keep in mind that USAT is 70 ton, AC is 100 ton and no idea what MTH is rated.

I'm sure you'll find more things to buy than what you can afford.

Is it REAL? or Just 1:29 scale?

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Posted by enginear on Saturday, April 19, 2008 4:20 PM

just had to look at the coal cars for s___ and giggles. The MTH is a 4 bay, ? ton with markings:

cap 154000, ld lmt 168900, lt wt 51100 on the Erie hopper    (77 ton?)

cap ____?___  ,ld lmt 204500, lt wt 58500 on the CSX

cap ___?____  , ld lt 196200, lt wt 55800 on the BNSF

 

The USA 3bay, 70 ton hopper reads:

capy 140000, ld lmt 155300, lt wt 54700 on the IC

 

Aristo 3 bay, 100 ton hopper reads:

cap 200000, ld lmt 202600, lt wt 66200 on the WM

cap 200000, ld lmt 202300, lt wt 81400 on the SF

It appears the markings for cu ft (3450) is close on the MTH and the Aristo, while the USA  (2600) is smaller. Is the Aristo larger in real life than the MTH, maybe higher sides or something? 

 

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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, April 27, 2008 11:24 AM
OK, thanks guys! I just added my local.

I'm still really frustrated with ads not showing scale. I've been looking at a site w/MTH Railking thinking it was in 1:32, but then I just happened to see in the description of one of the passenger car sets that it's actually O gauge (which is 1:48). >:( How am I supposed to know what I'm getting if they never tell me???
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Posted by tangerine-jack on Sunday, April 27, 2008 12:01 PM

 SongMom wrote:
OK, thanks guys! I just added my local.

I'm still really frustrated with ads not showing scale. I've been looking at a site w/MTH Railking thinking it was in 1:32, but then I just happened to see in the description of one of the passenger car sets that it's actually O gauge (which is 1:48). >:( How am I supposed to know what I'm getting if they never tell me???

 

Sad truth about G and advertising is that most of the time you don't get told what scale it is.  "G" covers a lot of scales and a lot of manufactures play fast and loose with any kind of fidelity anyway.  Often it is a pig in a poke, but if you stick to one manufacturer, or those that only tell you true scale, or roll yer own, you should have no issues.

The Dixie D Short Line "Lux Lucet In Tenebris Nihil Igitur Mors Est Ad Nos 2001"

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Posted by enginear on Sunday, April 27, 2008 5:55 PM

All the MTH G scale ( 1/32) products that

Ihave purchased start with the # 70- (70-2005-1 for example). The O scale products start with different #s like 20- and 30-. The numbers starting with 80- appear to be HO scale. Hope this helps. Oh yeah they sell tinplate numbered 10-_ _ _ _ which is close to G gauge.

Usa Trains  and Aristocraft is 1/29 scale. Bachmann is bigger at 1/20 or 1/22

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Posted by lownote on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 10:28 AM

I wish I'd gone with 1:32. I jumped into this hobby with both feet and now I have a lot of stuff that doesn't quite match. It's not a big deal, and it's all fun, but if I were starting from scratch I think I'd go with 1:32, and here's why. (experts: if I get anything wrong let me know!)

Most--or a lot, anyway--of the garden railroads you see are in 1:20 or 1:22 or 1:24 scale, and they model stuff that was "narrow gauge" in real life--that is, engines and cars designed to run on tracks that were closer together than the standard railroads you see today. These narrow gauge lines were especially common in the American West and in the late 1800s. So a lot of garden railways have what might be described as an "old West" look. It's a good look for the garden--charmingly old fashioned--and narrow gauge stuff typically was smaller in size  and ran on smaller, tighter curves than "mainline," standard gauge trains. So narrow gauge models look "rght" running in the kinds of layouts most people have.

I like "american mainline" stuff, the trains that ran on standard gauge track in the middle of the 20th century.  If that kind of stuff was modeled at 1:20 it would be HUGE and would look ridiculous on anything but a really really big layout with very very broad curves. Here's an example--a Bachmann k-27, which is considered a really big narrow gauge locomotive modeled in 1:20--next to a standard gauge 1:20 engine

 

So paradoxically--and my wife's eyes always glaze over when I try to explain this--American mainline trans are usually modeled in smaller scales, like 1:29. Otherwise they'd be too big.

Here's a page with a neat scale viewer that lets you see how differnet scales look

 http://www.madcattoys.com/page/MCT/scaleviewer

I have a couple Aristocraft 1:29 steam engines, and they're great but they look a little too big on my layout, which has nothing smaller than 8 ft curves. I have some 1:22 and 1:24 locomotives and I think they just look more comfortable. on a rely big loayout, Like Marty Cozad's, 1:29 would be da bomb

So hence 1:32--that way I could run American mainline stock and not have it look as outsized on my smallish line. And also MTH trains are initially more expensive, but they have all thei things you want built iin already--sound, remote control, and a really advanced set of control options.

It's true there's less stuff, but in retrospect that's the way I'd go. On the other hand, it hardly matters, and it's still a lot of fun

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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 2:48 PM
Lownote, me too....I understand what your sayn.
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Posted by markperr on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 10:23 PM

Hi Songmom;

You mentioned that "classic" old time look.  In this gauge, that says to me that you are looking into narrow gauge running (but that's just my observation).  If that is so, then you would more likely want to model in 1:20.3.

You see, "G" is a generic term for models that fall in the range of 1:13.7 to 1:32.  The larger the number that follows the colon, the smaller the actual model becomes in relation to the track.  The only thing constant among the various scales is the track which is 45mm (roughly 1 3/4 in. wide between the rails)..

1:13.7 represents trains running on tracks that, in real life were only two feet wide.  This is affectionately known as Maine 2 foot gauge. 

1:20.3, 1:22.5 and most 1:24 models represent real life locos of the old west which ran on tracks three feet wide, or 3 foot gauge.

Models in 1:29 and 1:32 represent american mainline (today's modern rail) which is 4 foot, 8 1/2 inches between the rails.

I run diesels of the sixties and seventies eras thus I model mostly 1:29.  I could also model 1:32, which would be more prototypically accurate, but I already have too much invested in 1:29 and to me, 1:32 is significantly smaller in comparison and, regardless of the "10ft rule", it just is too obvious to me.

If you have a ton of 1:32 horses and are looking to create some sort of scene on your layout, then I say "go for it".  If it's just a couple, then you might want to consider one of the other scales listed above that fits in closer to what you are envisioning.  The horses would be relatively inexpensive to replace.

Mark 

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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, April 30, 2008 3:03 AM

Song,

Sweet Santa Fe lives in Orem and she has several shops in her area.

Toad - Master of none

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Posted by DMUinCT on Wednesday, April 30, 2008 8:31 AM

On the left, MTH Dash-8 (1/32) ---On the right AristoCraft RS3 (1/29) 

Bachmann Hoppers behind the RS3.

 

Don U. TCA 73-5735

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Posted by trainsok on Tuesday, May 06, 2008 1:24 PM

 

Several people mentioned the rarity of buildings in 1:32. I find it easier to scratch-build structures than to use the 1:24 or 1:22.5 or larger structures sold commercially. 1:29 is only a defacto scale for mainline garden railroaders who apparently never get closer than 10 feet to their trains.If you want road vehicles on your layout, you'll find a large selection of 1:32 automobiles and trucks, etc. You won't find any in 1:29.

 I have been in this hobby long enough to have experienced several  "de facto" scales. Since I have no interest in narrow gauge, 1:20.3 is a non-starter for me. I have tried 1:29 and found it not to my liking. It is larger than 1:32 but sits on trucks squeezed together. Some of the  of car dimensions are also squeeze. making the 1:29 designation suspect.

 

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Posted by piercedan on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 11:02 AM

MDC is no longer producing, but was 1/32 scale.  I believe Lionel was 1/32 also.

Aristocraft is 1/29, but the classic line is 1/24 (C-16 engine for example).  The snow plow is 1/24.

 

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Posted by FJ and G on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 11:58 AM
forced perspective works with buildings of any scale; just place them away from the tracks. In FP, a farmhouse a mile away across a field looks tiny. Got the picture?
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Posted by DMUinCT on Thursday, May 08, 2008 10:01 AM

 Posting a Photo again, It's OK to "Mix and Match" car sizes.

Real Railroads did, the New Haven during WWII,

Don U. TCA 73-5735

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Posted by lownote on Thursday, May 08, 2008 11:22 AM

You can put whatever you want on the track, and it's all fun. Our layout has
 a bunch of different scaled stuff on it, and I regularly run consists of mixed scale. Whether or not it "works" depends on.

 

1. How discerning your eye is. Some people notice the differences and it spoils the effect. Some don't care

2. What's being modeled. Scale differece is much more apparent if the thing being modeled has a lot of volume. for example, it's much harder to notice the scale difference in a flatcar than it is in a boxcar.

3. Where it's placed. Placing 1:20 figures next to 1:32 figures makes an obvious difference. Placing a 1:32 figure near a 1:20 doorway dramatizes the difference. Placing groups of 1:32 figures 5 feet away from groups of 1:20 figures makes scale differences harder to see

4. The figures/models themselves. Manufacturers are often extremely loose about scale. LGB, for example, seems to make stuff in whatever scale they want

 

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Posted by Tommy0218 on Thursday, May 08, 2008 11:50 AM
 lownote wrote:

I wish I'd gone with 1:32. I jumped into this hobby with both feet and now I have a lot of stuff that doesn't quite match. It's not a big deal, and it's all fun, but if I were starting from scratch I think I'd go with 1:32, and here's why. (experts: if I get anything wrong let me know!)

Most--or a lot, anyway--of the garden railroads you see are in 1:20 or 1:22 or 1:24 scale, and they model stuff that was "narrow gauge" in real life--that is, engines and cars designed to run on tracks that were closer together than the standard railroads you see today. These narrow gauge lines were especially common in the American West and in the late 1800s. So a lot of garden railways have what might be described as an "old West" look. It's a good look for the garden--charmingly old fashioned--and narrow gauge stuff typically was smaller in size  and ran on smaller, tighter curves than "mainline," standard gauge trains. So narrow gauge models look "rght" running in the kinds of layouts most people have.

I like "american mainline" stuff, the trains that ran on standard gauge track in the middle of the 20th century.  If that kind of stuff was modeled at 1:20 it would be HUGE and would look ridiculous on anything but a really really big layout with very very broad curves. Here's an example--a Bachmann k-27, which is considered a really big narrow gauge locomotive modeled in 1:20--next to a standard gauge 1:20 engine

 

So paradoxically--and my wife's eyes always glaze over when I try to explain this--American mainline trans are usually modeled in smaller scales, like 1:29. Otherwise they'd be too big.

Here's a page with a neat scale viewer that lets you see how differnet scales look

 http://www.madcattoys.com/page/MCT/scaleviewer

I have a couple Aristocraft 1:29 steam engines, and they're great but they look a little too big on my layout, which has nothing smaller than 8 ft curves. I have some 1:22 and 1:24 locomotives and I think they just look more comfortable. on a rely big loayout, Like Marty Cozad's, 1:29 would be da bomb

So hence 1:32--that way I could run American mainline stock and not have it look as outsized on my smallish line. And also MTH trains are initially more expensive, but they have all thei things you want built iin already--sound, remote control, and a really advanced set of control options.

It's true there's less stuff, but in retrospect that's the way I'd go. On the other hand, it hardly matters, and it's still a lot of fun

Lownote

I like Mainline loco's as well however, I noticed you mentioned 1.20.3 standard gauge would be too big. I have to disagree as if you look back in American history, the prototypes were not the same size, nor did they run on the same width of track for that matter.

I for instance like to run both guages in 1.20.3 scale as I think it gives it a more realistic look. I use code 215 for narrow and code 250 for standard. I have fun with both scales.

You should try it sometime Captain [4:-)]

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