Getting Started

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Getting Started
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, August 11, 2002 7:34 PM
I am finally able to pull the trains I collected growing up out of the boxes. I have a 20 x 16 room for my railroad. I plan to use 0-54 and 0-72 track. What tips can anyone offer? I am interested in things such as.. roadbed, wiring, power systems, what if anything should I put on top of a plywood table for sound reduction? Really any tips would be greatly appreciated.
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Posted by MikeSanta on Sunday, August 11, 2002 10:44 PM
For a layout that size I would recommend using what they call a "buss wire" to wire your layout:that is, you run big wires under the layout(i have 14 and bigger) from which you run "feeder" wires from the buss wires to the track or accessories. VERY IMPORTANT!!! Color code your wires so you can keep things straight. The big buss wires minimize your voltage loss. Use the feeder wires every 3 or 4 feet. If you're going to use MTH DCS, use "star or " home run" wiring. Otherwise, the classic buss wires under the track loop will work, and it sounds like you have normal engines and not command stuff. If you have postwar helicopter and satellite cars or rocket launchers put your train table low: otherwise put it 40 inches high for more storage. Build it so you can walk on it and put in access hatches.
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Posted by Algonquin on Monday, August 12, 2002 10:00 PM
Hi,

I would recommend stopping by a local hobby shop and picking up one or two good books on building an O-gauge railroad. There are many available that cover all areas from building the benchwork to wiring and scenery. We can help out with specific questions you have.

I like going to my local hobby shop because I can thumb though the books and buy the ones I think will benefit me the most. You can also find several books here on this site. Checkout the Classic Toy Trains page and check under books and magazines.

Regards,

Tim Pignatari

A penny saved is a penny earned. But every once in a while it is good to treat yourself to a gum ball.

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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, August 17, 2002 10:58 AM
I second the previous comments, as far as table top and road bed are concerned I've used 1/2" Homosote (available at lumber yards) screwed with 1" drywall screws on top of 1/2" plywood. It helps cut down the noise, takes paint and other sceenery finishes well, and it is easy to screw track or accesories by hand.
Track screws hold well and I've also used a pnumatic brad nailer to attach Gargraves wooden tie flex track (its been down over 8 years) with no movement.
The type of track you use will also affect noise level, so additional roadbed may or maynot be needed.
I've built quite a few tables for others this way and it has worked well.
Now I just need to build my own, and get the trains out of the boxes.
Good luck.
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 20, 2002 8:44 PM
Thanks everyone for the tips. I have found some books that have been helpful. Unfortunately, I don't have a good local hobby store.
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Posted by Algonquin on Wednesday, August 21, 2002 12:39 PM
You can try the various manufacturer web site to locate a hobby shop near you. Lionel (www.lionel.com) has a dealer locator program on their site. I would imagine that other major manufacturers such as K-Line and MTH have similar tools.

As you have specific questions, post them here and we can try to help.

Regards,

Tim Pignatari

A penny saved is a penny earned. But every once in a while it is good to treat yourself to a gum ball.

  • Member since
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  • 302,230 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 29, 2002 3:28 PM
You'll find all sorts of stuff for O and O27 at http://www.thortrains.net Everything from track plans to wiring.
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 15, 2002 4:22 PM
Tim,
Thought you might be able to help me out or point me in the right direction. I found my old Marx Streamline, Steam type electric train, Model 24922.I'm missing the transformer and need a replacement.Don't know the current value either. Any ideas? Please advise.

Yours Truly,
Rhodie
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Posted by Algonquin on Monday, September 16, 2002 9:50 PM
Hi Rhodie,

My copy of Greenberg's Guide to Marx Trains, Volume III, Sets, copyright 1991, indicates that your set includes a 400 0-4-0 black plastic locomotive, 951 NYC Tender, 3550 NYC Black Crane Car, 80410 C&O black flatcar with lumber load, 2700 NKP black flatcar with lumber load and a 20121 NYC red and grey caboose.

The guide does not indicate the type of Marx Transformer that was originally included with the set. Marx made many different type of transformers. Your set most probably included one of their 45 or 50 watt transformers.

The value of the set with the set box, per the 1991 guide is $65 in Good condition and $125 in excellent condition. The missing transformer will not effect the sets value much. The trains condition and the condition of the original box have the biggest effect on value. A replacement Marx transformer can easily be picked up at a train meet for $5-10. These values are about 10 years old. To check what this set and similar sets are going for you can check E-bay. A lot of Marx sets have gone through there. You can also check out an updated price guide for current values. Kalmbach and TM Books and Videos may have a current price guide.

If you are looking for a replacement transformer to run the set, any of the small Marx or Lionel transformers (45-50 watts or higher) will be suficient to run the set.

Let me know if you need any other information.

Regards,

Tim Pignatari

A penny saved is a penny earned. But every once in a while it is good to treat yourself to a gum ball.

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