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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 9-11-21 SCOUT SALUTE! PART 3

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  • Member since
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  • 552 posts
SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 9-11-21 SCOUT SALUTE! PART 3
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, September 11, 2021 5:53 PM

SCOUT SALUTE!  PART 3
56 WORDS

  1. In part one we looked at (_ _ _ _ _ _) 2-4-2’s, and part two examined the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) that actually came with “(_ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _)” 1001T or 6001T tenders.  Not including minor variations, the “true scouts” of 1948 to 1952 account for eight (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _).  But most of us apply the term “(_ _ _ _ _)” to a lot of locos and (_ _ _ _) that were made after Lionel dropped the special (_ _ _ _ _ _ _).
  2. Most of these locos wore basic (_ _ _ _ _) with few (_ _ _ _) pieces or embellishments.  But the No. 2034 was closer to (_ - _ _ _ _ _) standards than most O - 27 scouts.  A (_ _ _ _ _) motor with a three position (_ - _ _ _ _) oriented lever (_ _ _ _) and an operating headlight make it one of the more desirable die - cast 2-4-2’s operationally speaking.
  3. And now we’re up to the loco that has all the features (or lack thereof) that most directly influenced the 200 (_ _ _ _ _ _) Columbias many of us got started with; the No. 1130.
  4. Based on the 2034, which can trace it’s lineage to prewar (_ _ _ _ _), the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) bodied, metal motored, lever down No. 1130 came first with a No. 6066T “(_ _ _ _ _ _)” tender and later the 1130T small (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) model.
  5. So, why do the 200 series 2-4-2’s have such a bad rep?  It’s the plastic motor with an integral (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) mechanism that causes all the headaches.  You have to remove the shell, the (_ _ _ _), the pilot & (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) trucks, them pull the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) before you can open the motor casing.  True, this is standard with just about every (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) steamer, but you can usually work on an (_ - _ _ _ _) without having to disassemble the entire motor and drive train.
  6. Plastic motors outnumber metal cased units two to one in the 200 series, and if we took a public survey of owners of (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _) 2-4-2’s from the 50’s and 60’s we’d probably find a similar ratio regarding product (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) among operators.  Still, there are some good if not great locos among the 200’s.
  7. In brief, five had (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) and two of them were equipped with two (_ _ _ _ _ _ _).  Ten out of 18 locos employed liquid type (_ _ _ _ _) units while all but one had a headlight (_ _ _ _).  Six locos had marker lamp (_ _ _ _ _ _), but none of those have MagneTraction or came with a metal motor.
  8. Of the two that have die - cast body (_ _ _ _ _ _), the Nos. 233 & 251, the 233 has two (_ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _) magnets, working headlight, smoke and was paired with a 233W (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) tender.  But the No. 251 is considerably more (_ _ _ _ _ _) and will run you twice as much as a No. 233 should you decide to (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) both.
  9.  The (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) No. 241 is deserving of attention because both (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) are equally scarce.  What makes them noteworthy is that in 1965 the loco had a wide (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) running board stripe while later 1966 locos have a narrow (_ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ _ _) white stripe, with the earlier, wider striped 2-4-2 commanding slightly higher prices.
  10. The No. 237 (which I may have mentioned was my first (_ _ _ _ _ _) locomotive) is a good example of the change in 200’s that occurred in 1964.  In 1963 the 237’s used the (_ _ _ _) originally created for die - casting.  But a new mold was created with (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) running boards that was more suitable for the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) molding process and thus the 237’s used it through 1966.
  11. Perhaps the prettiest (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) of the postwar era are the Nos. 247, 249 & 250.  Chronologically the No. 250 came first in 1957 and it is a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _).  With it’s (_ _ _) stripe proceeding from the pilot (_ _ _ _ _ _) to just shy of the rear of the tender (_ _ _ _), the only difference between the Nos. 250 and 249 was that the former had an (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) headlight that the latter, produced in 1958, lacked.
  12. After two years of featuring “scout” locos lettered for the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Railroad, decision makers at Lionel switched from red to (_ _ _ _) and created the No. 247 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) & Ohio.  Two versions exist; one with a solid “(_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _)” and the other with a see-through (_ _ _ _ _).

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 552 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, September 18, 2021 5:26 PM

SCOUT SALUTE!  PART 3
56 WORDS

  1. In part one we looked at (PREWAR) 2-4-2’s, and part two examined the (LOCOMOTIVES) that actually came with “(LIONEL - SCOUT)” 1001T or 6001T tenders.  Not including minor variations, the “true scouts” of 1948 to 1952 account for eight (STEAMERS).  But most of us apply the term “(SCOUT)” to a lot of locos and (CARS) that were made after Lionel dropped the special (COUPLER).
  2. Most of these locos wore basic (BLACK) with few (TRIM) pieces or embellishments.  But the No. 2034 was closer to (O - GAUGE) standards than most O - 27 scouts.  A (METAL) motor with a three position (E - UNIT) oriented lever (DOWN) and an operating headlight make it one of the more desirable die - cast 2-4-2’s operationally speaking.
  3. And now we’re up to the loco that has all the features (or lack thereof) that most directly influenced the 200 (SERIES) Columbias many of us got started with; the No. 1130.
  4. Based on the 2034, which can trace it’s lineage to prewar (LOCOS), the (PLASTIC) bodied, metal motored, lever down No. 1130 came first with a No. 6066T “(SQUARE)” tender and later the 1130T small (STREAMLINED) model.
  5. So, why do the 200 series 2-4-2’s have such a bad rep?  It’s the plastic motor with an integral (REVERSE) mechanism that causes all the headaches.  You have to remove the shell, the (RODS), the pilot & (TRAILING) trucks, them pull the (DRIVERS) before you can open the motor casing.  True, this is standard with just about every (POSTWAR) steamer, but you can usually work on an (E - UNIT) without having to disassemble the entire motor and drive train.
  6. Plastic motors outnumber metal cased units two to one in the 200 series, and if we took a public survey of owners of (STARTER - SET) 2-4-2’s from the 50’s and 60’s we’d probably find a similar ratio regarding product (SATISFACTION) among operators.  Still, there are some good if not great locos among the 200’s.
  7. In brief, five had (MAGNETRACTION) and two of them were equipped with two (MAGNETS).  Ten out of 18 locos employed liquid type (SMOKE) units while all but one had a headlight (LENS).  Six locos had marker lamp (JEWELS), but none of those have MagneTraction or came with a metal motor.
  8. Of the two that have die - cast body (SHELLS), the Nos. 233 & 251, the 233 has two (HIGH - POWER) magnets, working headlight, smoke and was paired with a 233W (WHISTLING) tender.  But the No. 251 is considerably more (SCARCE) and will run you twice as much as a No. 233 should you decide to (COLLECT) both.
  9.  The (UNCATALOGED) No. 241 is deserving of attention because both (VARIATIONS) are equally scarce.  What makes them noteworthy is that in 1965 the loco had a wide (PAINTED) running board stripe while later 1966 locos have a narrow (RUBBER - STAMPED) white stripe, with the earlier, wider striped 2-4-2 commanding slightly higher prices.
  10. The No. 237 (which I may have mentioned was my first (LIONEL) locomotive) is a good example of the change in 200’s that occurred in 1964.  In 1963 the 237’s used the (MOLD) originally created for die - casting.  But a new mold was created with (THINNER) running boards that was more suitable for the (INJECTION) molding process and thus the 237’s used it through 1966.
  11. Perhaps the prettiest (COLUMBIAS) of the postwar era are the Nos. 247, 249 & 250.  Chronologically the No. 250 came first in 1957 and it is a (CLASSIC).  With it’s (RED) stripe proceeding from the pilot (LADDER) to just shy of the rear of the tender (TANK), the only difference between the Nos. 250 and 249 was that the former had an (OPERATING) headlight that the latter, produced in 1958, lacked.
  12. After two years of featuring “scout” locos lettered for the (PENNSYLVANIA) Railroad, decision makers at Lionel switched from red to (BLUE) and created the No. 247 (BALTIMORE) & Ohio.  Two versions exist; one with a solid “(COWCATCHER)” and the other with a see-through (PILIOT).

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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