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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 8-22-21 SCOUT SALUTE! PART 1

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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 8-22-21 SCOUT SALUTE! PART 1
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, August 21, 2021 4:32 PM

SCOUT SALUTE!  PART 1
53 WORDS

  1. “The biggest model (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) news in years!” screamed the text on page four of Lionel’s 1948 catalog.  “Just look at the super (_ _ _ _ _) - detailing!” continued the copywriter’s hyperbole.  “Presenting two richly - colored (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) sets, with sensational ‘(_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _)’ control for uncoupling cars.”
  2. The No. 1001 “Powerful four - wheel (_ _ _ _ _) locomotive” was indeed “Brand New!” in 1948 as the catalog claimed.  However, the 2-4-2 “(_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _)” type locomotive was certainly nothing new on the (_ _ _ _ _ _) Lines.  And yet, the moniker “(_ _ _ _ _)” has become forever linked with practically all (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) set steamers and at least three freight cars ever since (and somewhat backwards in time too).
  3. But don’t presume that 2+4+2 equals inexpensive in Lionelville.  The wheel arrangement appeared first on the venerated (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Gauge Nos. 390 & 390E in 1929.  And it was a 390E that led the first Blue (_ _ _ _ _) sets in 1930, certainly not a low end 2-4-2!
  4. Over in O - Gauge, seventeen (_ _ _ _ _ _) locos used the Columbia wheel arrangement, including (_ _ _ - _ _ - _ _ _ - _ _ _ _) steamers.  At the high end was the No. 260E, which, in 1935, came equipped with both a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) mechanism inside the boiler and an air (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) in the (_ _ _ _ _ _) wheeled 263W tender.
  5. Prewar Columbias also wore (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) shrouds styled along the lines of the NYC’s (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _), as on the Nos. 264E, 265E, 289E & 1689E, and modeled the Pennsylvania Railroad’s “(_ _ _ _ _ _ _)” with the No. 1688.  And, by the way, finding a (_ _ _ _) No. 265E to pull your Nos. 617, 618 & 619 “Blue (_ _ _ _ _ _)” (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) passenger cars will set you back a few pesos.
  6. Predating the No. 204, “the loco from whence the familiar (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) Scout steamers came”, was the No. 1664 of 1938.  Originally painted (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) gray, the (_ _ _ - _ _ _ _) 1664E shared boiler and cab castings with the 2-6-2 1666E.  Including the (_ _ _ _ _ _) cab floor and (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) bell the 1666 lost after the wartime production hiatus ended.
  7. As you may know, the No. 1666 was the O - 27 version of the (_ - _ _ _ _ _) No. 224 steamer.  And Lionel also produced an “economy” version of the 2-6-2 No. 224 by installing a 2-4-2 (_ _ _ _ _) train in the higher end boiler, thus producing the No. 229.  Late 1664 and 229 steamers came with (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) bodied 2666T or 2666W tenders, but, an 1330T (_ _ _ _ _) streamlined tender is a better size match if you’re going to use either of these locos to pull (_ _ _ _ _ _) coupler cars.
  8. And it was the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) No. 204 of 1940 that introduced the diminutive boiler (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) that started so many of us on the way to loving toy (_ _ _ _ _ _).  It was a No. 237 with smoke, (_ _ _ _ _) position reverse and working headlight manufactured in 1965 that first enthralled me by the way.
  9. The 204 was part of the O - Gauge line, meaning that it shared (_ _ _ _ _ _) features it’s later offspring would lose.  Chiefly, the prewar 204’s had (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) and (_ _ _ _ _ _) - rimmed (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) disc drivers (but fewer (_ _ _ _) than the No. 229 of 1939-42).
  10. The first O - 27 “Scout” was the No. 1684.  And although it’s (_ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _) boiler, cab and (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) casting was not new in 1941, the 1684 with it’s rimless (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) was, perhaps, the clearest (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) of things to come after the war.
  11. I’d be remiss if I didn’t go back and highlight my personal (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) prewar 2-4-2; the 1835E.  Produced from 1934 to 1939, there’s just something about the (_ _ _ _ _ _) all - weather cab, (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) boiler and “high - drivered” look of this loco that screams “(_ _ _) TRAIN!” to my eyes.
  12. Some will say the chugger equipped No. 385E’s with (_ _ _) wheels and more (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) are a better representative of prewar Columbias.  But, the lower price point of the 1935E better typifies the Scout (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) this puzzle is about, even in the land of Standard Gauge behemoths!

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 552 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, August 28, 2021 5:14 PM

SCOUT SALUTE!  PART 1
53 WORDS

  1. “The biggest model (RAILROAD) news in years!” screamed the text on page four of Lionel’s 1948 catalog.  “Just look at the super (SCALE) - detailing!” continued the copywriter’s hyperbole.  “Presenting two richly - colored (FREIGHT) sets, with sensational ‘(MANUMATIC)’ control for uncoupling cars.”
  2. The No. 1001 “Powerful four - wheel (DRIVE) locomotive” was indeed “Brand New!” in 1948 as the catalog claimed.  However, the 2-4-2 “(COLUMBIA)” type locomotive was certainly nothing new on the (LIONEL) Lines.  And yet, the moniker “(SCOUT)” has become forever linked with practically all (STARTER) set steamers and at least three freight cars ever since (and somewhat backwards in time too).
  3. But don’t presume that 2+4+2 equals inexpensive in Lionelville.  The wheel arrangement appeared first on the venerated (STANDARD) Gauge Nos. 390 & 390E in 1929.  And it was a 390E that led the first Blue (COMET) sets in 1930, certainly not a low end 2-4-2!
  4. Over in O - Gauge, seventeen (PREWAR) locos used the Columbia wheel arrangement, including (TOP - OF - THE - LINE) steamers.  At the high end was the No. 260E, which, in 1935, came equipped with both a (CHUGGER) mechanism inside the boiler and an air (WHISTLE) in the (TWELVE) wheeled 263W tender.
  5. Prewar Columbias also wore (STREAMLINED) shrouds styled along the lines of the NYC’s (COMMODORE) (VANDERBILT), as on the Nos. 264E, 265E, 289E & 1689E, and modeled the Pennsylvania Railroad’s “(TORPEDO)” with the No. 1688.  And, by the way, finding a (BLUE) No. 265E to pull your Nos. 617, 618 & 619 “Blue (STREAK)” (ARTICULATED) passenger cars will set you back a few pesos.
  6. Predating the No. 204, “the loco from whence the familiar (POSTWAR) Scout steamers came”, was the No. 1664 of 1938.  Originally painted (GUNMETAL) gray, the (DIE - CAST) 1664E shared boiler and cab castings with the 2-6-2 1666E.  Including the (SQUARE) cab floor and (MOVABLE) bell the 1666 lost after the wartime production hiatus ended.
  7. As you may know, the No. 1666 was the O - 27 version of the (O - GAUGE) No. 224 steamer.  And Lionel also produced an “economy” version of the 2-6-2 No. 224 by installing a 2-4-2 (DRIVE) train in the higher end boiler, thus producing the No. 229.  Late 1664 and 229 steamers came with (PLASTIC) bodied 2666T or 2666W tenders, but, an 1330T (SMALL) streamlined tender is a better size match if you’re going to use either of these locos to pull (NUCKLE) coupler cars.
  8. And it was the (UNCATALOGED) No. 204 of 1940 that introduced the diminutive boiler (CASTING) that started so many of us on the way to loving toy (TRAINS).  It was a No. 237 with smoke, (THREE) position reverse and working headlight manufactured in 1965 that first enthralled me by the way.
  9. The 204 was part of the O - Gauge line, meaning that it shared (DETAIL) features it’s later offspring would lose.  Chiefly, the prewar 204’s had (HANDRAILS) and (NICKEL) - rimmed (BALDWIN) disc drivers (but fewer (RODS) than the No. 229 of 1939-42).
  10. The first O - 27 “Scout” was the No. 1684.  And although it’s (ONE - PIECE) boiler, cab and (STEAMCHEST) casting was not new in 1941, the 1684 with it’s rimless (DRIVERS) was, perhaps, the clearest (PORTENT) of things to come after the war.
  11. I’d be remiss if I didn’t go back and highlight my personal (FAVORITE) prewar 2-4-2; the 1835E.  Produced from 1934 to 1939, there’s just something about the (SLOPED) all - weather cab, (CONICAL) boiler and “high - drivered” look of this loco that screams “(TOY) TRAIN!” to my eyes.
  12. Some will say the chugger equipped No. 385E’s with (RED) wheels and more (BRIGHTWORK) are a better representative of prewar Columbias.  But, the lower price point of the 1935E better typifies the Scout (FRUGALITY) this puzzle is about, even in the land of Standard Gauge behemoths!

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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