Colber Coal

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  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: US
  • 440 posts
Colber Coal
Posted by Algonquin on Monday, February 5, 2001 8:53 AM
I recently came across two cans of model railroad coal manufacturered by Colber. I am interested in any additional information other Forum members know about this product. I am aware that Colber manufacturer "O" gauge accesories in the mid to late 1950s.

The cans of coal are about 4 inches in diameter and about 4 inches tall.

Any information relative to this product would be appreciated.

Tim P.

A penny saved is a penny earned. But every once in a while it is good to treat yourself to a gum ball.

  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: US
  • 440 posts
Posted by Algonquin on Monday, February 5, 2001 9:05 AM
I did find this additional information about Colber posted on the model railroading frequently asked questions pages:

COLBER

Founders Antony Collett and William Burke initially started in the appliance business in New York, NY, and later began repairing trains as a Lionel service station. In 1946 Trains became their primary business as they became Train Center of America, and grew to be the largest Lionel distributor in the East. Unable to stock trains fast enough to meet demand, they began making low price versions of Lionel accessories in 1948 as Colber Manufacturing Company. Their versions included beacon and floodlight towers, watchman's shanty, street lights, and wig-wag signal.

Colber received a stern warning from Lionel concerning their packaging in 1950, concerning that it was a near copy of Lionel's, which led to its modification. During 1951-54 Colber supplied Flyer with several accessories in addition to its own line by using different nameplates and plastic colors. By 1954 Flyer no longer needed Colber's help and the toy train market was shrinking so Colber decided to leave the market. They sold their dies to Marx, who primarily wanted them out of the market, and switched to electronic components, which it still makes today.

Tim P.

A penny saved is a penny earned. But every once in a while it is good to treat yourself to a gum ball.

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