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Do you think......

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  • Member since
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  • From: Omaha, Nebraska
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Do you think......
Posted by Willy2 on Monday, August 18, 2003 8:33 AM
Do you think any of the Big Boys will ever run again[?] I myself think that they probably won't. Still I just keep hoping that some group or somebody will want to restore one of them. [:(]

Willy

Willy

  • Member since
    January 2002
  • From: Omaha, Nebraska
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Do you think......
Posted by Willy2 on Monday, August 18, 2003 8:33 AM
Do you think any of the Big Boys will ever run again[?] I myself think that they probably won't. Still I just keep hoping that some group or somebody will want to restore one of them. [:(]

Willy

Willy

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    April 2003
  • From: US
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Posted by AltonFan on Monday, August 18, 2003 12:21 PM
Unfortunately, the really big engines don't lend themselves to excursion service. Too many headaches trying to move the engines around bridges and curves they can't negotiate. Restoration groups would be best advised to put their efforts into engines that can pull an average-sized excursion train, and are capable of crossing any bridge or rounding any curve that can be found on the secondary trackage still in use. I imagine the bigger engines meeting this description would be 4-6-2s, 2-8-2s, 2-8-4s, and smaller 4-8-2s and 4-8-4s.

Ironically enough, planners for a visit of Challenger 3985 to the Chicago area a few years ago discovered that local bridges were too light for some of the latest diesel power, and one has started seeing two units on the front and one on the rear of UP trains moving through the area.

Dan

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Posted by AltonFan on Monday, August 18, 2003 12:21 PM
Unfortunately, the really big engines don't lend themselves to excursion service. Too many headaches trying to move the engines around bridges and curves they can't negotiate. Restoration groups would be best advised to put their efforts into engines that can pull an average-sized excursion train, and are capable of crossing any bridge or rounding any curve that can be found on the secondary trackage still in use. I imagine the bigger engines meeting this description would be 4-6-2s, 2-8-2s, 2-8-4s, and smaller 4-8-2s and 4-8-4s.

Ironically enough, planners for a visit of Challenger 3985 to the Chicago area a few years ago discovered that local bridges were too light for some of the latest diesel power, and one has started seeing two units on the front and one on the rear of UP trains moving through the area.

Dan

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  • From: Kansas City area
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Posted by Trainnut484 on Monday, August 18, 2003 2:20 PM
Chances are very slim if one is restored, mainly due to the condition of the locomotive. Also, if anyone other than UP restores one, it doesn't mean the railroads want it on their mainline..ie insurance costs. Don't get me wrong. I like to see one restored as with any big steamer, like a Santa Fe 2900, but it won't do good if the railroads won't let it run on their tracks.

Take care[:)]
All the Way!
  • Member since
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  • From: Kansas City area
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Posted by Trainnut484 on Monday, August 18, 2003 2:20 PM
Chances are very slim if one is restored, mainly due to the condition of the locomotive. Also, if anyone other than UP restores one, it doesn't mean the railroads want it on their mainline..ie insurance costs. Don't get me wrong. I like to see one restored as with any big steamer, like a Santa Fe 2900, but it won't do good if the railroads won't let it run on their tracks.

Take care[:)]
All the Way!
  • Member since
    April 2002
  • From: Nashville TN
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Posted by Wdlgln005 on Monday, August 18, 2003 9:17 PM
At some point they will all be moved inside for protection from the weather. Just like Museum of Science & Industry, everythiing moved inside before it turns into a rust bucket. Every city with an old steamer in your city park needs to keep an eye on it, before somebody calls ole 99 a hazard to children. The old trainshed here in Nashville next to Union Station suffered the same fate. Supposed to be a historical landmark, last of it's kind, but with no money to preserve it, down it went. To make room for a parking lot. At least Union Station is a hotel.
Glenn Woodle
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  • From: Nashville TN
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Posted by Wdlgln005 on Monday, August 18, 2003 9:17 PM
At some point they will all be moved inside for protection from the weather. Just like Museum of Science & Industry, everythiing moved inside before it turns into a rust bucket. Every city with an old steamer in your city park needs to keep an eye on it, before somebody calls ole 99 a hazard to children. The old trainshed here in Nashville next to Union Station suffered the same fate. Supposed to be a historical landmark, last of it's kind, but with no money to preserve it, down it went. To make room for a parking lot. At least Union Station is a hotel.
Glenn Woodle
  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 1:17 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Willy2

Do you think any of the Big Boys will ever run again[?] I myself think that they probably won't. Still I just keep hoping that some group or somebody will want to restore one of them. [:(]

Willy


I may be wrong, but weren't they restoring the one down in Texas (Age of Steam Museum) for a movie a few years ago? It seems like I saw something in the Trains mag about this. If they did whatever movie it was should be out anytime now.

Don't quote me on it, its just seem like I saw something about it though.

We can hope. [:)]

Stay Safe, and Look, Listen, and L I V E

Ed for President
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 1:17 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Willy2

Do you think any of the Big Boys will ever run again[?] I myself think that they probably won't. Still I just keep hoping that some group or somebody will want to restore one of them. [:(]

Willy


I may be wrong, but weren't they restoring the one down in Texas (Age of Steam Museum) for a movie a few years ago? It seems like I saw something in the Trains mag about this. If they did whatever movie it was should be out anytime now.

Don't quote me on it, its just seem like I saw something about it though.

We can hope. [:)]

Stay Safe, and Look, Listen, and L I V E

Ed for President
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 17,823 posts
Posted by Overmod on Saturday, September 27, 2003 11:34 PM
If I recall correctly, Steve Lee himself has said that a Big Boy will not run again (on UP trackage). I doubt that any successor at UP Steam Ops would have a different view. Very few other railroads would have an interest in something so big, heavy, and long tying up a mainline.

Perhaps more to the point: In a day and age where fantrips behind smaller engines don't fill the train, how would you propose to fill the rather longer trains needed to justify the larger power?

The general consensus on the Texas movie is that (1) it's not really happening, (2) they figured early on that CGI was a better way to make trains 'come alive' than a multimillion dollar restoration, (3) the project collapsed for want of a sensible script. Take your pick, but don't wait for the theatrical release...
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 17,823 posts
Posted by Overmod on Saturday, September 27, 2003 11:34 PM
If I recall correctly, Steve Lee himself has said that a Big Boy will not run again (on UP trackage). I doubt that any successor at UP Steam Ops would have a different view. Very few other railroads would have an interest in something so big, heavy, and long tying up a mainline.

Perhaps more to the point: In a day and age where fantrips behind smaller engines don't fill the train, how would you propose to fill the rather longer trains needed to justify the larger power?

The general consensus on the Texas movie is that (1) it's not really happening, (2) they figured early on that CGI was a better way to make trains 'come alive' than a multimillion dollar restoration, (3) the project collapsed for want of a sensible script. Take your pick, but don't wait for the theatrical release...

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