N&W v C&O Photography and Filming

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, May 29, 2020 12:07 PM

Flintlock76
There was a booth where railroadiana was being sold, and there was what I'm going to call a "brakeman's kit" for sale.  It held fusees of different colors, a red flag, and even track torpedoes!

Watch the hair stand up on the back of my neck!

You do know those things tend to become violently unstable with age, even to the point small amounts of normal vibration or temperature change will detonate them?  And nifty lead-based shrapnel for a gift that keeps on giving...

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, May 29, 2020 2:20 PM

Overmod
You do know those things tend to become violently unstable with age, even to the point small amounts of normal vibration or temperature change will detonate them?

No, but I shouldn't be surprised, if I'm guessing right those torpedoes were probably loaded with a hearty helping of fulminate of mercury, or something similar.  Just as well I passed on the brakeman's kit, who needs a time bomb in the house?

Lady Firestorm's enough of a time bomb as it is! 

I don't know where that kit eventually wound up, but I haven't heard of any houses blowing up locally lately!  The last back-yard blow-up we had here was from some poor guy trying to deactivate an 8 inch Civil War mortar shell.  He wasn't as good at it as he thought he was.   Whistling

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Posted by Deggesty on Friday, May 29, 2020 5:02 PM

Flintlock76

 

 
Overmod
You do know those things tend to become violently unstable with age, even to the point small amounts of normal vibration or temperature change will detonate them?

 

No, but I shouldn't be surprised, if I'm guessing right those torpedoes were probably loaded with a hearty helping of fulminate of mercury, or something similar.  Just as well I passed on the brakeman's kit, who needs a time bomb in the house?

Lady Firestorm's enough of a time bomb as it is! 

I don't know where that kit eventually wound up, but I haven't heard of any houses blowing up locally lately!  The last back-yard blow-up we had here was from some poor guy trying to deactivate an 8 inch Civil War mortar shell.  He wasn't as good at it as he thought he was.   Whistling

 

I understand that old black powder is something you do not fool around with. I think of the cannon I saw in the Rhode Island state house several years ago--it had a cannonball from a Confederate cannon in its mouth which landed there just when the crew had the cannon ready to shoot. I do not remember what had been done in an attempt to render the powder charge safe from exploding.

Johnny

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, May 29, 2020 5:44 PM

Johnny, I think I've got the whole story of that cannon with the ball lodged in the muzzle around here somewhere.  I'll try to find it and get back to everyone with a report.

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Posted by Deggesty on Friday, May 29, 2020 6:44 PM

Flintlock76

Johnny, I think I've got the whole story of that cannon with the ball lodged in the muzzle around here somewhere.  I'll try to find it and get back to everyone with a report.

 

Wayne, I would be glad to read what you have on it. It was about 30 years ago that I saw it--back when it was possible to roam around in capitols without being accosted by security personnel. I have even wandered around the capitol in Washington, seeing the bier that has been used for viewing the bodies of personages as Abraham Lincoln, and riding both senate subways. The only time someone spoke to me was to tell be to sit down in the House gallery.

Johnny

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Posted by FlyingScotaman on Friday, May 29, 2020 7:09 PM

A few more Virginnian AG scenes on this one if you rummage..........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFiFf-unWTE

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Posted by Penny Trains on Friday, May 29, 2020 7:41 PM

Flintlock76
The last back-yard blow-up we had here was from some poor guy trying to deactivate an 8 inch Civil War mortar shell. He wasn't as good at it as he thought he was.

Reminds me of an episode of Adam 12 where a couple of guys were shooting at a case of dynamite in the back yard.  Tongue Tied  Since those shows were based on real events, I have to imagine that somebody was actually drunk enough to do that.  Tongue Tied

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, May 29, 2020 9:24 PM

Flintlock76

Johnny, I think I've got the whole story of that cannon with the ball lodged in the muzzle around here somewhere.  I'll try to find it and get back to everyone with a report.

 

OK, got it!

This is from "Gettysburg:  Stories of Men And Monuments"  by Frederick W. Hawthorne and published by the Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides. (Gettysburg.)

The cannon, a 12 Pound Napoleon, belonged to Battery B, 1st Rhode Island Artillery.  Heavily engaged on the third day of the battle I'll quote the story directly.

On July 3, the battery was in the hottest spot in the afternoon cannonade.  Losses from July 2 had reduced the battery to the point where just four guns could be worked.  As these four responded to the Confederate cannons across the valley projectiles exploded all around.  One of the guns was being loaded at the instant a Confederate shell hit the muzzle face and exploded.  Private William Jones, holding the rammer in his job of Number 1, was killed instantly as a shell fragment tore through the side of his head.  Beside him, Number 2, Private Alfred Gardner, had started to insert the next round when the shell hit tearing his arm off.  He died shouting "Glory to God!  I am happy!  Hallelujah!"

The two remaining gunners, Sergeant Albert Straight and Corporal Joseph M. Dye, tried to finish loading.  Dye thumbed the vent while the Sergeant attempted to load the round.  The dented muzzle made it difficult for him to get the projectile in alone, so Dye rigged a piece of cloth and a rock to seal the vent and went around to help.  The two tried to ram the shot down to no avail.  Their efforts ended when another Confederate shell exploded near the gun wrecking a wheel.  As the gun cooled the shot they were loading became permanently lodged in the barrel.

Today, the gun is on display at the Statehouse in Providence, Rhode Island.   

And here it is.  http://golocalprov.com/news/ris-famous-gettysburg-gun-honored-in-state-house-ceremony  

That's a solid shot lodged in the muzzle, so it's no danger to anyone.  And have a look at those old Rhode Island regimental flags in the display case behind.

 

Isn't that something?  Those were some highly motivated cannon-cockers! 

The monument to Battery B, 1st Rhode Island Artillery, was dedicated at Gettsyburg in 1886.  It's there to be seen on Hancock Avenue, right across from the "Confederacy's High Water Mark"  monument, the famous "Bronze Book."

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Posted by Deggesty on Saturday, May 30, 2020 8:03 AM

Thanks, Wayne.

My paternal grandfather was there; his regiment was not in Pickett's Division, but was ordered to take part in the charge. He died in 1926, at the ripe age of 83.

Johnny

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, May 30, 2020 8:42 AM

You're welcome Johnny!

That's amazing about your grandfather.  It's even more amazing anyone lived through that hell-storm of lead and iron.  Occasionally they have Civil War and militaria shows here in the Richmond area, and it's staggering to see the BUCKETS of bullets and shell fragments that have been dug out of the ground of Virginia battlefields.  It's a miracle anyone lived through any of them!

A bit more of the Battery B story, courtesy of Wanswheel.

https---killedatgettysburg.org-william-jones-1st-rhode-island-light-artillery-

Wayne 

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