The Dr. Seuss of railroad movies

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The Dr. Seuss of railroad movies
Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, August 11, 2019 7:09 PM

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Posted by M636C on Sunday, August 11, 2019 9:35 PM

BaltACD

 

"For a non-stopper, a Topper is proper,

the Homburg is for trains of low station..."

(the arrival at Edinburgh Waverley)

Peter

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Posted by cx500 on Sunday, August 11, 2019 11:42 PM

At the 17:00 mark, did you notice the glimpse of the heavy duty railway crane on the adjacent track?  Possibly heading out to or returning from some little "oops".

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, August 12, 2019 6:52 AM

Note the lovely little stainless-steel fox, contributed by Samuel Fox & Co (the stainless-steel specialist firm within United Steels) in 1935.  This celebrated or advertised (depending on the source you consult) the stainless trim on the locomotives and streamlined cars.  (I think this is Everbright, but have not found definitive confirmation so far on the Web)

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, August 12, 2019 8:39 AM

Overmod

Note the lovely little stainless-steel fox, contributed by Samuel Fox & Co (the stainless-steel specialist firm within United Steels) in 1935.  This celebrated or advertised (depending on the source you consult) the stainless trim on the locomotives and streamlined cars.  (I think this is Everbright, but have not found definitive confirmation so far on the Web)

 

 

I'm a little disappointed.  The green eggs and ham never showed up.

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, August 12, 2019 9:23 AM

Flintlock76
I'm a little disappointed.  The green eggs and ham never showed up.

Possibly the best thread title reference this year!

Of course, I was going to say the fox wasn't in the box yet in 1935... then I realized I was watching it in a movie on a monitor.  

Balt, please edit the thread title to spell the name correctly.  

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Monday, August 12, 2019 11:05 PM

Overmod

Balt, please edit the thread title to spell the name correctly.  

 

You mean "Theodor Geisel"????

OTOH, there was a Dr Seuss on the UCSD faculty who was an early expert in C14 dating - remember him giving a lecture at our Jr High back when I was in 8th or 9th grade.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 8:13 AM

Ever see the training film Dr. Seuss (Ted Geisel) collaborated on with director Frank Capra for US troops preparing to occupy post-war Germany?

It's called "Your Job In Germany," it was considered so well done Warner Brothers released it commericially with the title "Hitler Lives" and it won the "Best Documentary" Oscar in 1946.

Years later both Frank Capra and Dr. Seuss were a little embarassed by it for painting with too broad a brush, but certainly at the time it seemed the best thing to do, and you really can't blame them.  I don't.

Anyway, here it is.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCHeFjADTTs  

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 8:30 AM

Erik_Mag
You mean "Theodor Geisel"????

No, Seuss: the reference was to the nonsense rhyme in the narration, which to my knowledge Geisel did not use in most of his 'serious' work.

Although it does have to be said that Dr. Seuss never 'stooped' to using limericks!

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 2:49 PM

I figured you were refering to the spelling of "Seuss", but decided to have a bit of fun. I did have a couple of classmates who did know the "real" Dr Seuss (of C14 fame) and made a point of that.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 5:18 PM

Erik_Mag
I figured you were referring to the spelling of "Seuss", but decided to have a bit of fun.

I know; I was being mock-serious in riposte.

It was a sharp stick in the eye every time I looked at the original title...

(On the other hand, I started looking up etymology and, lo and behold! I've been using the word "suss" wrong for over 50 years!)

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, August 14, 2019 7:48 AM

Overmod

Note the lovely little stainless-steel fox, contributed by Samuel Fox & Co (the stainless-steel specialist firm within United Steels) in 1935.  This celebrated or advertised (depending on the source you consult) the stainless trim on the locomotives and streamlined cars.  (I think this is Everbright, but have not found definitive confirmation so far on the Web)

 

 

I don't think the four silver A4s had any stainless trim, apart from the fox on "Silver Fox". The numbering was silver decals shaded blue and the name was similarly painted (after Gresley's daughter had the brass nameplates removed as not matching the image).

There certainly was stainless trim on the single "Silver Jubilee" train set. This was covered in textured plastic in a silver grey colour (similar to material used in bookbinding) but had metallic car numbers and window frames.

The later (1937) "Coronation" locomotives had extensive stainless steel trim, including the company letters and the cabside numbers. There were four two tone blue train sets (Two "Coronation", one "West Riding Limited" one spare (which also covered the "Silver Jubilee").

Other blue A4s like "Mallard" and "Sir Nigel Gresley" were built with yellow decals rather than the stainless but stainless numbers and letters appeared on more locomotives post WWII (I think "Eisenhower" may have been the first).

"Silver Fox's" logo might have led to the stainless trim on later locomotives....

Peter

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