Unique Trains and Sightings

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Unique Trains and Sightings
Posted by Miningman on Friday, November 09, 2018 8:54 PM

The New Haven FL9's are certainly a well discussed Locomotive. Here is one on a dinner train in Quebec with a rather attractive paint scheme.

How about their road switcher... one of only 2 units ever made by MLW, the M420TR... had Alco survived in the US would we have seen many more?

Third photo reveals Central Vermont and Grand Trunk (not GTW) GP9's deep into Ontario ( very rare occurance) at Oshawa and not only that but on a CPR Division, and still in green and gold to boot! 

Orford Express 

Magog, QC 

Operating over Central Maine & Quebec Sherbrooke Subdivision. 

Features fine dining journeys. 

OEXX 484 acq. 2/2012 (nee NH 2029) FL9 1750 HP EMD 21975 11/1957
Lake Argent, Eastman, QC July 16, 2017. 
OEXX 6121, 6125 ex CN 6121, 6125 RDC-1 with 310 (nee NP 310) dome car Budd 7/1954. 

Unique electric/diesel-electric units built in two orders of 30 units each for New Haven to operate underground into 
New York City passenger terminal on third rail DC electric. B-A1A wheel arrangement. 

OEXX 26 (acq. 12/2008 (ex Roberval &Saguenay 26) M420TR 2000 hp MLW M-6051-1 4/1972 
Magog, QC October 15, 2016 

Beyond unique! Only 2 units were ever built! R&S 25 and 26.

Canadian Pacific Railway

Trenton Division 

R.L.Kennedy

 

New photo additions:

Extra CV 4550 with GT 4445 trailing. Unusual to see US power in Canada this far in.

 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Friday, November 09, 2018 10:03 PM

AHA!  Now we see you're not quite doctrinaire on steam as you'd like us to think you are, you do have a soft spot for some diesels!

That's ok, I understand, I've got a soft spot for some of those smelly things myself.

As a matter of fact some O gauge diesels have managed to infiltrate into my "Chugger Barn."  Why?  Wellllll, they were on sale!

Great photos by the way!

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, November 09, 2018 10:20 PM

I can always count on Firelock to answer and contribute on one of my threads. It's nice to know. A very fine and stout ( of character, not girth) fellow Forum member. 

Well it took me a very long time to warm up to anything Diesel, probably around the time F units started to disappear en masse or around 1982 whichever came first. However it is strictly a secondary thing. Modern day Diesels hold less than zero interest for me. Nothing has been shown or put forth that holds the least bit of excitement or wow factor. I don't mind the look of the now retiring Genesis units and they sounded nice at idle and starting. The MLW/Alco LRC's as in VIA had a great hammering sound and smoked it up but they were ugly. The new Chargers look like a shrimp, as in shrimp cocktail. Freight locos all look the same and do nothing to inspire. 

 

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, November 10, 2018 10:57 AM

Here is the Central Vermont loco in the photo #4550 on home rails in Vermont. Note running cab forward vs. long hood forward in the first photo. So deep into Ontario, running long hood forward on CPR tracks back when the CPR and CN never talked to each other, in green and gold still and with a Grand Trunk locomotive as a companion. Yeah that's pretty darn odd and very unique.

 More on Oshawa for those interested

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, November 10, 2018 1:23 PM

Well that answers a question that I've been puzzling about.  There was a Grand Trunk Railway in Canada and a Grand Trunk Railway in India.  I've wondered which one came first and who "stole" that name from who.

Looks like Canada got there first, especially with a build date of 1856.

It is a cool-sounding name anyway you look at it.  Very imperial.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Saturday, November 10, 2018 7:18 PM

That IS a great paint scheme!  Me likey!  Big Smile

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, November 10, 2018 9:23 PM

You know, sometimes I think the right shade of blue on a cab unit looks a lot better than the more popular red, and red's my favorite color.

Consider the color schemes on the Delaware and Hudson Baldwin "Sharks", and if you scroll down through the article see how you like the look of the D&H ALCO PA's.

https://american-rails.com/delaware-and-hudson.html

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Posted by M636C on Sunday, November 11, 2018 4:53 AM

Firelock76

Well that answers a question that I've been puzzling about.  There was a Grand Trunk Railway in Canada and a Grand Trunk Railway in India.  I've wondered which one came first and who "stole" that name from who.

Looks like Canada got there first, especially with a build date of 1856.

It is a cool-sounding name anyway you look at it.  Very imperial.

 
The line between Palmerston North and Hamilton  in the north island of New Zealand is known as the "North Island Main Trunk" or just "The Main Trunk".
 
This section was electrified, being about half the distance between Auckland and Wellington, leaving about a quarter of the distance to diesels at each end. Both Auckland and Wellington have electrified commuter systems but no locomotives for freight trains.
 
Peter
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Posted by SSW9389 on Sunday, November 11, 2018 6:58 AM

Miningman

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unique electric/diesel-electric units built in two orders of 30 units each for New Haven to operate underground into New York City passenger terminal on third rail DC electric. B-A1A wheel arrangement.  

The New Haven's FL9s were built in three orders by EMD. The first two units were built on order 3192 to test the concept of the FL9. Then about a half year later 28 more units were built on order 3193. The last 30 units were built on order 3198. 

Ed in Kentucky

COTTON BELT: Runs like a Blue Streak!
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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, November 11, 2018 11:49 AM

Thanks for the correction SSW9389. It's an important distinction, got to get these things right!  

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, November 12, 2018 11:21 AM

All CV GP9s had dual controls, so could operate either end forward.  By habit CV ran them long hood forward, because that's where the "F" mark on the frame was.

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, November 12, 2018 12:05 PM

Ah-ha! That explains it. Did not know. Thanks.

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Posted by Fr.Al on Thursday, November 15, 2018 3:37 PM

I vote that FL-9 as a fine looking locomotive. That being said, I see the practicality of Geeps and similar units. Again, one man's opinion.

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Posted by wjstix on Monday, November 26, 2018 4:05 PM

Firelock76

Well that answers a question that I've been puzzling about.  There was a Grand Trunk Railway in Canada and a Grand Trunk Railway in India.  I've wondered which one came first and who "stole" that name from who.

Looks like Canada got there first, especially with a build date of 1856.

It is a cool-sounding name anyway you look at it.  Very imperial.

 

How about the Grand Trunk Western in the U.S.?

There are a few railroads/railway names that have been used in multiple countries. Both the U.S. and the U.K. had a Great Northern Ry. (Scotland and I believe Northern Ireland) for example. Also a Great Western Railway in the U.K. and a Great Western Railway of Colorado.

 

Stix
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Posted by Firelock76 on Monday, November 26, 2018 7:01 PM

The Grand Trunk Western in the US?

Well, to make a long story very short, it was owned by the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada, later part of Canadian National.

GTR put the GTW together by purchasing a number of smaller American 'roads in the Midwest, basically to gain access to that part of the US. 

So, the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada is still the senior "Grand Trunk."

Mind you, these "Grand" guys have nothing to do with either railroad...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jL4rXHt0_GI    Give it a few seconds to load.

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 7:04 AM

Firelock76
Mind you, these "Grand" guys have nothing to do with either railroad...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jL4rXHt0_GI    Give it a few seconds to load.

Don't know if the performers are all still alive - however, if there were to redo that video today DevilAngryDevilAngryDevilAngryDevilAngryDevilAngry

         

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 10:20 AM

wjstix
There are a few railroads/railway names that have been used in multiple countries. Both the U.S. and the U.K. had a Great Northern Ry. (Scotland and I believe Northern Ireland) for example. Also a Great Western Railway in the U.K. and a Great Western Railway of Colorado.

Don't forget the Southern Railway.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 5:41 PM

BaltACD
 
Firelock76
Mind you, these "Grand" guys have nothing to do with either railroad...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jL4rXHt0_GI    Give it a few seconds to load.

 

Don't know if the performers are all still alive - however, if there were to redo that video today DevilAngryDevilAngryDevilAngryDevilAngryDevilAngry

 

Glad you liked it Balt!  I hope veryone else did too!

You're right, it just couldn't be done today, at least not like that.  Was it really 44 years ago?  Where did the years go to?

Anyway, to keep the "railroading" in this, how about GFR's cover of "Loco-Motion?"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvoqsVpZDSw

PS:  Watching those '40s jitterbuggers it's no mystery to me anymore why so many of the folks who were young back then need hip replacements now!

 

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