Grand Trunk Western Covered Wagons over the years.

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Grand Trunk Western Covered Wagons over the years.
Posted by Miningman on Friday, November 02, 2018 10:40 PM

9000:2nd with two other A units still used on GTW. (9000-9004 used on GTW 1968-1981) 
Durand 6/1969 Paul Mc Grane 

GTW 9008-9010 on the shop track. Detroit. 11/07/1959 Paul Mc Grane Collection 

GT 9012 9022 part of two orders F3A units. GTW 9006-9015 (10 units) and GTW 9016-9027 (12 units). 
9012 EMD 5211 5/1948 and 9022 EMD 5221 9/1948
Durand Union Station 3/1/1969 

GTW 9020 one of 20 F3 A units. EMD 5219 9/1948 Detroit Paul Mc.Grane 

Note: 9016-9027 built with F7 electrical = "F5A" 
Also, stainless steel grills instead of chicken wire. 

GTW 9024 CV 4553 (ex CV 1/1965) and another covered wagon. 

GT 9026 GTW 4427 


 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, November 03, 2018 3:31 AM
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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, November 03, 2018 11:47 AM

Now what in tarnation is that? Great find!

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, November 05, 2018 10:04 AM

I believe that it's a Winton-powered EMC switcher.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, November 05, 2018 1:59 PM

78 is a 1938 600 HP Winton-engined SC (renumbered from 7800).  I think the "covered wagon" thing behind it is a shroud from an Alaska RR RS1, not a complete locomotive.  What it's doing in GTW's shop (and paint) is more of a mystery...

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, November 05, 2018 2:26 PM

rcdrye
I think the "covered wagon" thing behind it is a shroud from an Alaska RR RS1, not a complete locomotive.

Problem there is that it doesn't look at all like Alaska RR shrouded RS-1:

even is we overlook that suspicious round sticker glued on, not just old but paint-stained, or the presence of a radiator panel in that Baldwin Babyface nose ...

Could this be a yard tractor of some kind with a 'winter cab' arrangement that doubles as part of a Grand Trunk parade float or special-occasion "road train"?  That might help explain the enigmatic orange 'markers' at the top cab corners? 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, November 05, 2018 3:05 PM

A different GTW parade float, celebrating the Battle Creek's centennial in 1931:

http://dspace.willard.lib.mi.us/xmlui/bitstream/handle/123456789/11001/LPC-020-017-001A.jpg?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Trinity River Bottoms Boomer on Monday, November 12, 2018 6:28 PM

Wonder how many "Yanks" (American railfans south of the Canadian border) still resent the "invasion" by Canadian National?  Afterall, somehow, CN just don't look quite right in the Creseant City of New Orleans does it? 

Had BN and CN merged, and acquired the rights from Union Pacific, naming the new railroad after onetime Missouri Pacific subsidiary, International-Great Northern, it would have sounded much more appropriate in my opinion.

As it stood, since CN went it alone, and assume it had named itself Grand Trunk Rail (after the onetime line in New England but part of the CN empire) would railfans in the U.S. have accepted it's expansion in the south in a more positive fashion?

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