Auto Trade in the Classic Days... The Russell...

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Auto Trade in the Classic Days... The Russell...
Posted by Miningman on Saturday, October 06, 2018 8:10 PM

Before the Impala! Also made a track inspection car!

Russell Motor Car Company 

CCM experimented with gas-powered tricycles and quadricycles, the steam Locomobile and the electric Ivanhoeautomobiles. The Locomobile had a short range of only 20 miles and froze up in winter. It was discontinued in 1902. 
The two-seat Ivanhoe had a range of 40 miles and could reach 14 miles per hour! It was designed by H.P.Maxim, son of Hiram Maxim, inventor of the famous Maxim self-powered machine gun and other things like the mouse trap! CCM formed the Russell Motor Car Company and expanded the CCM plant on Weston Road for auto production. It was named after Thomas Alexander Russell (1877-1940) CCM's general manager and later its president. In 1905 it produced the Russell model A, a two-cylinder gas engine automobile, sturdy and powerful with pneumatic tires and a three speed transmission it was an instant success even at a price of $1,300 ($500 more than the Ford Model C) which was a lot of money a century ago when workers were paid 25 cents and hour, ten hours a day, six days a week. The model A was followed by the Model B as well as police cars, fire engines and delivery trucks.

The Canadian Magazine April 1906 

Russell obtained exclusive Canadian rights to the Knight gasolene engine, a quality engine noted for its quietness and used in the famed Daimler. One prominent owner was John C. Eaton who drove around (or, was driven around!) in one bearing license plate number 1! Russell automobiles were provided for the 1911 Royal Tour of the Duke and Duchess of Connaught, thereafter earning them the right to use the highly sought-after By Royal Appointment statement. 

It didn't last long, in 1915 Russell was bought out by Willys-Overland Motor Company of Cleveland, Ohio, which saw no need for a Canadian-only automobile. 

First public display of the Russell Model A at Toronto City Hall, 1905.
Toronto Reference Library 966-1-6 


Russell No.12 Railway inspection car. Advertisement 1907. 


Links to more resources

http://legionmagazine.com/en/2002/01/rolling-out-the-russell/

http://www.lib.uwo.ca/business/cr-russell.htm

http://www.mbautomuseum.com/Tour/Russell-Knight.htm

http://www.mbautomuseum.com/Tour/Overland.htm

http://www.legionmagazine.com/features/canadianreflections/02-01.asp

Of course all Canadians instantly recognize CCM as the manufacturer of hickey sticks and equipment, not to mention bicycles!

But ... they also handled this weird thing for farming. The Moline Tractor

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, October 06, 2018 8:46 PM

Late fix--- That should be hockey sticks not hickey sticks. I cannot 'reach it' in Edit Mode. Mind you they were made of hickory sometimes. 

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, October 07, 2018 10:02 AM

   Adverts for the Russell auto. 

To M636C--I noticed Melbourne along the bottom of listings locations. So you had Russell's down under! British Commonwealth and all that. 






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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, October 07, 2018 11:59 AM

 

From this interesting tidbit article. Hard work for sure.

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, October 07, 2018 3:15 PM

M636C-- Indeed these autos did go to Australia. Sheep treks? Kangaroo bushes? Can you enlighten a bit? 

Also my Alma Mater, the University of Toronto, Rugby Team. T.A. Russell was on the team.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Monday, October 08, 2018 4:56 PM

I tried Mike, I really tried, no luck, it won't work for me.

He knows what it's about.

https://books.google.com/books?id=TfjkcHnt9m8C&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=true

Hot stuff!  It worked this time!

Check it out folks, some nice wheels from the "Wheel" himself!

Yeah, he's still out there, lurking around and making use of his minions like myself and others!

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, October 09, 2018 9:51 PM

Thanks for persisting Firelock. Nice book for my collection. Thanks to you know who as well, of course. No kid growing up in Canada didn't have something from CCM. 

It's still that way. 

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Posted by M636C on Friday, October 12, 2018 6:04 PM

Miningman

M636C-- Indeed these autos did go to Australia. Sheep treks? Kangaroo bushes? Can you enlighten a bit? 

Also my Alma Mater, the University of Toronto, Rugby Team. T.A. Russell was on the team.

 

I've spoken about this on the AA20-1 thread.

The terms "sheep trek" and "kangaroo bushes" are unknown in Australia.

As I indicated, sheep stations  are generally open grassland with very few trees. The Russell cars might indeed have been used on sheep stations, but the photo is likely to have been taken on a road through a thick forest area, possibly to give a background for a publicity photograph.

American cars were very popular in rural Australia up until the 1960s.

Of course many of these cars were Canadian, particularly Fords, Ford Australia being a subsidiary of Ford Canada, but I recall Pontiac Parisiennes, Fargo trucks and so on. By 1960, locally designed Ford, GM and Chrysler cars were being built with relatively high ground clearance.

The cars had to be strong. Someone, possibly in Windsor Ontario, decided that the Ford Falcon was just right for Australia. It looked good and was the right size but fell to pieces on rural roads. The engineers had to use thicker sheet and more welds and more subtle changes to keep the cars in one piece. The suspension components needed changes too, of course.

This wasn't confined to Ford. Years later, GM decided to use the German Opel Commodore (an Opel Rekord with a six cylinder engine). The GM engineers all knew about Ford's problems  and an unexpected change was made. The German car had a counterbalanced engine hood, pretty standard for the period. But this involved recesses in the firewall that turned out to be highly stressed. To meet Australian requirements, the counterbalance was removed and replaced by a folding strut to hold the hood open (which took some strength to open, too).

But the customers appeciated a car that didn't fall apart...

Peter

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, October 13, 2018 12:13 AM

Fascinating. 

'Lets go on a sheep trek in the kangaroo bushes' has a ring to it. 

Someone talented should write a tune.  

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 13, 2018 10:49 AM

No "sheep trek" songs I'm aware of, but here's something close courtesy of the incomperable Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TEACjM8RNs

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, October 13, 2018 1:05 PM

That will do! Had me hopping all over the kitchen. Throw in some strong fiddle stuff and it could be a tune from up here with French origins. Music truly is universal and timeless. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 13, 2018 2:13 PM

Vince, if you liked that you'll love this, nothing to do with sheep, it's a fisherman song done by Liam Clancy.  Liam tells the story.

Haunting and timeless with an undercurrent of pride, it could be about fishermen anywhere, the British Isles, the Canadian Maritime provinces, New England, the Chesapeake, just anywhere.

"Shoals of Herring."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYQrWVSV5Ag

 

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, October 13, 2018 3:52 PM

Miningman
'Lets go on a sheep trek in the kangaroo bushes' has a ring to it.  Someone talented should write a tune.

But isn’t “kangaroo bush” referring to a particular sort of country, not to a bunch of shrubs?  As in. ‘Out in the bush’?

Even Monty Python didn’t have a song about the shrubberies.

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, October 13, 2018 4:39 PM

Ah yes, the shrubberies, not to forget the Lupins. 

Australia, Australia, we luv ya, Bruce!

....won't go into the next line..no way.

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Posted by M636C on Saturday, October 13, 2018 5:36 PM

Overmod

  

Miningman
'Lets go on a sheep trek in the kangaroo bushes' has a ring to it.  Someone talented should write a tune.

 

But isn’t “kangaroo bush” referring to a particular sort of country, not to a bunch of shrubs?  As in. ‘Out in the bush’?

Even Monty Python didn’t have a song about the shrubberies.

 

Monty Python did have a song about lumberjacks in British Columbia...

Peter

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 13, 2018 6:02 PM

M636C
 
Overmod

  

Miningman
'Lets go on a sheep trek in the kangaroo bushes' has a ring to it.  Someone talented should write a tune.

 

But isn’t “kangaroo bush” referring to a particular sort of country, not to a bunch of shrubs?  As in. ‘Out in the bush’?

Even Monty Python didn’t have a song about the shrubberies.

 

 

 

Monty Python did have a song about lumberjacks in British Columbia...

Peter

 

Thanks a lot Peter!  Now that bloody "Lumberjack Song" is going to be running though my head all night!

Well if I have to suffer with it so does everyone else!

Ahem...

"I'm a lumberjack and I'm OK, I sleep all night and I work all day..."

Didn't know I could sing, did you?

Wayne

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, October 13, 2018 6:05 PM

" ... I wish I was a girlie, just like my dear Papa ..."

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, October 15, 2018 10:07 AM

Firelock76
 

Didn't know I could sing, did you?

Wayne

 

 
And I still don't.Smile, Wink & Grin
The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Miningman on Monday, October 15, 2018 7:04 PM

Lorne Park, girls gathering lupine, train passing. - June 12, 1927

Lorne Park, girls gathering lupine, train passing. – June 12, 1927

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